Can I do a Masters in another discipline? Watch

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Jim
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#1
Report Thread starter 14 years ago
#1
Hi there!

I am a socalled international (= non-british) student currently pursuing a first degree in International Business at Brighton uni. The course comprises the usual business stuff (accounting, marketing, economics etc), as well as a module called French for Business. To improve my chances of getting a job and also because I quiet like studying (seriously) I am now contemplating doing a Masters degree at another university in the UK.
To cut a long story short, is it possible / usual / reasonable in this country to do a Masters in a discipline that is somewhat different to the undergraduate discipline?
I found that I quiet like languages and as French is a part of my course I would love to do a Masters in French or Linguistics or anything related to that.
I checked the websites of most universities offering those courses, but they don't say anthing about admissions requirements there.
Is this reasonable in terms of employment chances or is it more reasonable to consider a Masters in Marketing or Finance or something that is really 100% related to my current degree course?

Please can anybody help. It's greatly appreciated!

Jim
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J.S.
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Report 14 years ago
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(Original post by Jim)
Hi there!

I am a socalled international (= non-british) student currently pursuing a first degree in International Business at Brighton uni. The course comprises the usual business stuff (accounting, marketing, economics etc), as well as a module called French for Business. To improve my chances of getting a job and also because I quiet like studying (seriously) I am now contemplating doing a Masters degree at another university in the UK.
To cut a long story short, is it possible / usual / reasonable in this country to do a Masters in a discipline that is somewhat different to the undergraduate discipline?
I found that I quiet like languages and as French is a part of my course I would love to do a Masters in French or Linguistics or anything related to that.
I checked the websites of most universities offering those courses, but they don't say anthing about admissions requirements there.
Is this reasonable in terms of employment chances or is it more reasonable to consider a Masters in Marketing or Finance or something that is really 100% related to my current degree course?

Please can anybody help. It's greatly appreciated!

Jim

So many questions!!!

Ok....

Yes you can do a masters in a different discipline, although it's not quite that simple. In most area's you're able to study for a masters in something unrelated, in others there are prerequisites, i.e. for Economics, Maths, Med., English, Computing, Law they do usually demand that you have studied at least a 'relevant degree' beforehand. However, even in these subjects there are 'conversion' masters degrees, particularly in computing, these are aimed at people with little/no prior knowledge. Also, the other complication is that very competitive grad. schools can afford to be fussy and say...if you're applying for International Relations at LSE at MSc, they may just reject you if there's absolutely anything they do not like about your application (they usually have a policy of accepting those with relevant degrees/experience, or very exceptional people without).

For a masters in a language, you'd have to be at the standard of an undergrad. with a degree in that language, else you'd either be rejected or you'd struggle. That's the general rule, if you want specifics you're going to have to phone up the places you've an interest in.

As for employment prospects, well that too is far from straightforward. Firstly, as is common knowledge, you cannot make up for a poor undergrad. qualification via a masters. If you can go and get something absolutely expcetional at masters level, i.e. a distinction, then it may help, of course. However, on the whole I think a masters is for those with a passion for their subject and particularly for those wanting to get into academia.

There were also specific business degrees you mentioned in Finance and Marketing. Well, again, same applies I think. I don't think it's going to really help that much, unless there's a particular element in finance/marketing that you wish to develop.
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Jim
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#3
Report Thread starter 14 years ago
#3
Hi J.S.

Thanks a bunch for the brilliant response! You must be some kind of webmaster here. I have been doing a lot of research over the last few days and I believe I've got a better understanding now of the whole educational system in the UK. The undergraduate/postgraduate system is somewhat different from that of other European countries, so it takes some time to get the point.
Thanks again and please stick around. You are an asset to this board!

Jim




(Original post by J.S.)
So many questions!!!

Ok....

Yes you can do a masters in a different discipline, although it's not quite that simple. In most area's you're able to study for a masters in something unrelated, in others there are prerequisites, i.e. for Economics, Maths, Med., English, Computing, Law they do usually demand that you have studied at least a 'relevant degree' beforehand. However, even in these subjects there are 'conversion' masters degrees, particularly in computing, these are aimed at people with little/no prior knowledge. Also, the other complication is that very competitive grad. schools can afford to be fussy and say...if you're applying for International Relations at LSE at MSc, they may just reject you if there's absolutely anything they do not like about your application (they usually have a policy of accepting those with relevant degrees/experience, or very exceptional people without).

For a masters in a language, you'd have to be at the standard of an undergrad. with a degree in that language, else you'd either be rejected or you'd struggle. That's the general rule, if you want specifics you're going to have to phone up the places you've an interest in.

As for employment prospects, well that too is far from straightforward. Firstly, as is common knowledge, you cannot make up for a poor undergrad. qualification via a masters. If you can go and get something absolutely expcetional at masters level, i.e. a distinction, then it may help, of course. However, on the whole I think a masters is for those with a passion for their subject and particularly for those wanting to get into academia.

There were also specific business degrees you mentioned in Finance and Marketing. Well, again, same applies I think. I don't think it's going to really help that much, unless there's a particular element in finance/marketing that you wish to develop.
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