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    Are there anyone currently doing Japanese Studies that can tell me the difference between Japanese studies BA hons and Japanese BA hons? It seems like Japanese studies covers a much broader scope and you had less of a focus on building up your Japanese language skills.

    To be honest it seems a little 'Mickey mouse' to me. Maybe someone can set me straight??
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    From what I understand, the BA Japanese Studies doesn't include the third year in Japan and you focus less on the language and more on other aspects, such as history, literature, art.
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    (Original post by MisaG)
    From what I understand, the BA Japanese Studies doesn't include the third year in Japan and you focus less on the language and more on other aspects, such as history, literature, art.
    :eek: A Japanese degree without a year abroad in Japan!? What would be the point ??.
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    (Original post by lunchbox)
    :eek: A Japanese degree without a year abroad in Japan!? What would be the point ??.
    Doing the Japanese degree isn't all about a year in Japan, If you think so then i'd just take a holiday there or something. as one reply said: "you focus less on the language and more on other aspects of Japan" (poorly quoted) that's the difference between both courses.
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    Since the Japanese culture is so large and interesting, it makes perfectly sense. Of course you must be very into it. I was considering applying for the BA Japanese instead of Japanese and Korean just because the former would give me a better preparation in Japanese culture (not language) which I love.
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    (Original post by Kukukichu)
    Doing the Japanese degree isn't all about a year in Japan, If you think so then i'd just take a holiday there or something. as one reply said: "you focus less on the language and more on other aspects of Japan" (poorly quoted) that's the difference between both courses.
    That doesn't make sense to me whatsoever. If you devote a whole degree to the study a country and its culture then it makes perfect sense to spend a year there. You'd learn so much more just being there and experiencing things for yourself. I think the option should at least be presented to its students.

    And anyway there shouldn't be any reason why they couldn't organize the course better to allow for a year abroad.

    And I'm not a fan of holidaying just for the fun of it... even on holiday I'd like to turn it into a productive experience.

    It's like studying biology and never doing experiments. You get my drift.
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    This might sound extremely harsh, but from what I've heard, apparently the BA Japanese is a lot more intense than the BA Japanese Studies, and this new degree is actually an alternative for students who find the former too hard and thus can switch (instead of dropping out altogether.)
    Japanese at SOAS is extremely intensive, I have a lot of friends doing this who are really struggling. Some actually regret their choice, but are sticking with it. Apparently, last year there were 120 first years. At the beginning of this year, there were 60 second years. There are now only 55 left, and from a friend in 2nd year, the 2nd year is a lot more stressful than the first, so passing the first year is not exactly "a victory."
    If you're willing to put your social life at stake for the sake of Japanese, do BA Japanese. If not, do the latter.
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    I said "apparently". I myself am not doing Japanese. Just a friend doing second year Japanese told me. But she only arrived this year, so she's also relying on other secondary sources.

    But I do know that I see quite a few of my friends doing BA Japanese struggling to keep up.
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    From what I've heard/read I think BA Japanese Studies is just BA Japanese but without the language component. So you can do some language as an optional module but the main focus is on culture, literature, art etc. They added it as an easier alternative to the BA Japanese.

    I think it sounds a bit boring not studying the language but maybe that's just me - the language is the best part.
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    (Original post by Tefhel)
    From what I've heard/read I think BA Japanese Studies is just BA Japanese but without the language component. So you can do some language as an optional module but the main focus is on culture, literature, art etc. They added it as an easier alternative to the BA Japanese.

    I think it sounds a bit boring not studying the language but maybe that's just me - the language is the best part.

    My thoughts exactly.... However, not everyone is a genius at languages like Gwilym and a lot of people do struggle with the course especially in second year. (And some of them are people who did it at GCSE/A level, and got good marks. Just because you did doesn't mean you'll get by easily.) I think it becomes a lot more academic in terms of what you study. Anyway.. some people do end up spending hours studying. The truth is some people just aren't cut out for it. So yeah, JapStudies is there for them. (And for other reasons too.) Pretty much all the Japanese students think of it as a cop-out tho.

    e: Tefhel, they do study the language, just at a slower/less intensive pace. (I.e., we cover a textbook a term, they do one for the entire year and less kanji/week etc.)
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    (Original post by miniteen)
    This might sound extremely harsh, but from what I've heard, apparently the BA Japanese is a lot more intense than the BA Japanese Studies, and this new degree is actually an alternative for students who find the former too hard and thus can switch (instead of dropping out altogether.)
    Japanese at SOAS is extremely intensive, I have a lot of friends doing this who are really struggling. Some actually regret their choice, but are sticking with it. Apparently, last year there were 120 first years. At the beginning of this year, there were 60 second years. There are now only 55 left, and from a friend in 2nd year, the 2nd year is a lot more stressful than the first, so passing the first year is not exactly "a victory."
    If you're willing to put your social life at stake for the sake of Japanese, do BA Japanese. If not, do the latter.
    Hmm, it is the same with Chinese and Arabic. A disgraceful drop out rate (that the university does nothing to reduce). To be honest, how you've described it makes it sound like torture and utterly unenjoyable. Isn't the point to enjoy what you study?

    And no offense, but why would anyone go through all that just do get a degree in 'Japanese' Where will that get you, exactly
 
 
 
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