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OMG "Get all of the answers right on 2 attempts or go to hell"kind of myst.shop. jobs watch

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    I've been applying for several mystery shopping jobs lately and I'm getting a bit discouraged and to be honest a bit effed off with how it works!

    Basically, I've signed up in some those relatively popular mystery shopping sites and I seem to be a suitable candidate but when it comes to the online tests, I end up biting the dust, since you are supposed to read some information and then answer a multiple choice questionnaire, AND get ALL of the answers correct in 2 or 3 attempts, depending on the company, or you're out :rant:

    I mean, those pictures they use to illustrate the so called mystery shoppers (images of people carrying like eight big bags, smiling radiantly and poncing about the street with all their goodies) are a far cry from the McBurger they offer to re inburse you plus 4 quid for your trouble :rolleyes:

    I'm wondering if all of these sort of jobs work more or less in the same way, and if that's the case, how to get the answers right? Is it luck, good memory, studying hard or what :confused:
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    If you can't remember things well enough to get the tests right, you won't remember the shopping experience well enough to write a decent report.
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    as above. I work in next and there's vast amounts of stuff that we need to know - a mystery shopper would need to be able to take all of it in very quickly and accurately to assess whether we're doing our job right!
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    Fair enough, although memorising written information is not exactly the same as remembering and recalling an actual experience (sights, names, activity around you, the manner in which you were approached...) Perhaps an actual event is a bit more memorable than a bunch of paragraphs you read from a computer screen?

    Um
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    To become a mystery shopper for xxxxxxxxxxx, you must have the following:

    - A good command of the English language (both written and spoken)
    - Access to a computer with Internet access and a printer
    - A personal email account
    - Access to transportation to travel to assessment locations
    - Access to a digital camera, camera phone or scanner to send copies of receipts
    - A bank account that accepts electronic payments (so we can pay you)
    Dear oh dear, I just realised, they all say the same but they never mention you must also posses a quasi photographic memory as well. It's like "Oh yeah, I have all that, I can totally have a go at it and make myself some extra cash"... Yeah of course :ahee:
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    (Original post by Tongolele)
    Fair enough, although memorising written information is not exactly the same as remembering and recalling an actual experience (sights, names, activity around you, the manner in which you were approached...) Perhaps an actual event is a bit more memorable than a bunch of paragraphs you read from a computer screen?

    Um
    you have no idea what you're talking about. The vast bulk of it *is* written information. Like you could read our customer service info and not remember any of it, and then when an assistant approaches you and asks "are you okay there" you might think that was good customer service and put a big tick on your mental checklist. When in actual fact it's a 'banned phrase' that we're not supposed to use. And things like knowing the differences between bootcut and flared jeans, which styles sit high on the waist, etc etc. Most of customer service is putting massive chunks of memorised information to good use; as a mystery shopper you need to be able to tell whether what we spout at you is correct or whether we're giving customers wrong information.
 
 
 
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