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    I'm doing an experiment to calculate the resistivity of constantan wire. I'm planning on doing this by measuring the potential difference across it and the current flowing through it. This will enable me to calculate resistance using ohm's law R=V/I. I will change the length and then plot a graph with length on the x-axis and resistance multiplied by cross-sectional area on the y-axis. Then take the gradient which is the resistivity.

    Firstly is this an appropiate method?
    Secondly, what are the control variables? As many as possible please... THANK YOU!
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    This sort of question is almost impossible to give advice on without outright helping you cheat, especially if marks are awarded for planning and identifying control variables :hmmmm: probably best to ask your teacher, as they'll know how much they can tell you
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    OCR A? I think I did this last year.
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    (Original post by WhatIsAUsername?)
    OCR A? I think I did this last year.
    OCR A no longer has coursework :nah: just in-class practicals under controlled conditions
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    (Original post by skipp)
    OCR A no longer has coursework :nah: just in-class practicals under controlled conditions
    It's edexcel

    And my teachers can tell me anything as they are used as a source so technically you're a source as well I'm not going to use it to cheat I just need a few ideas just say like temp you don't have to explain it :P
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    (Original post by skipp)
    Ah ok...on that understanding I can advise that your method will work, obviously you'll have to explain it in more detail in your coursework, but that's not necessary here Personally I'd control voltage using a power pack, if you kept this constant it'd become a control variable...although you may want to use a voltmeter to ensure it's the same each time.
    In terms of other control variables the one that immediately comes to mind is cross sectional area should ideally be one...although this is something to discuss (think about what happens when you cut a wire ).
    On changing the length, the voltage automatically changes should I adjust it to how it was originally? I got the one about CA, any others?

    And what the hell happens when you cut a wire!
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    (Original post by skipp)
    This sort of question is almost impossible to give advice on without outright helping you cheat, especially if marks are awarded for planning and identifying control variables :hmmmm: probably best to ask your teacher, as they'll know how much they can tell you
    You're right, all coursework is and should be done without any outside help.. :rolleyes: :p:
    I'm interested in the posts in this as this is in my GCSE coursework.
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    (Original post by Small123)
    You're right, all coursework is and should be done without any outside help.. :rolleyes: :p:
    I'm interested in the posts in this as this is in my GCSE coursework.
    Actually unless they've changed the course by huge amounts you'll be studying Resistance rather than Resistivity at GCSE, and the emphasis won't be on a lot of the things discussed here :p: it may hinder rather than help you to read all this...

    And yes I'm confused by this...so long as the OP is allowed outside sources (which isn't allowed in a lot of cases, but is in some I believe) and quotes all of these in her coursework, including this thread I think it should be ok...but it seems so grey...wondering if I should delete the more specific help...but this is less specific than what a teacher could give...and possibly hugely incorrect...the OP'll have to work out what she thinks ultimately...

    :erm: so unsure
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    (Original post by skipp)
    Actually unless they've changed the course by huge amounts you'll be studying Resistance rather than Resistivity at GCSE, and the emphasis won't be on a lot of the things discussed here :p: it may hinder rather than help you to read all this...

    And yes I'm confused by this...so long as the OP is allowed outside sources (which isn't allowed in a lot of cases, but is in some I believe) and quotes all of these in her coursework, including this thread I think it should be ok...but it seems so grey...wondering if I should delete the more specific help...but this is less specific than what a teacher could give...and possibly hugely incorrect...the OP'll have to work out what she thinks ultimately...

    :erm: so unsure
    We do both I think, but this stuff could help me .
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    (Original post by Small123)
    We do both I think, but this stuff could help me .
    Then just in case I'm going to have to delete everything :sigh:

    Resistivity at GCSE? I suppose it's easy enough :p:
 
 
 
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