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    (Original post by paddyman4)
    So that we can set our own monetary policy. The Bank of England is probably the best national bank in the world and needs to make choices for our country, not the EU central bank. We were free to devalue our currency through quantitative easing, a necessity in recent times. Were we part of the Euro, we would not have that freedom: we would be forced to endure the same monetary policy set for a group of countries with completely different economies to each other and to us.
    This is more or less correct...

    However, central banks are for the most part entirely ****. No single person/organisation should have that GIGANTIC power...the power to control money supply. I think it was M.A. Rothschild who said "Give me control of a nation's money and I care not who makes the laws". Whoever controls a nation's money supply is essentially controlling the nation. Political money SUCK.

    Free banking FTW. **** Central Banks of whatever kind. National or Supranational.
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    (Original post by addylad)
    Why are you so obsessed with the Euro?
    Mostly because the majority of our important trading partners are in the Eurozone, partly because Britain needs to wake up and realise that it doesn't have a future as a nation apart from Europe - and accepting things like the Euro will have to come sooner or later. The fact that the Euro is now the most traded and powerful currency in the world couldn't hurt the case to adopt it, as well.

    There will come a point when we adopt the Euro - that is unquestionable. Whether through choice or economic necessity is debatable. I simply think that we would be better off adopting the Euro under our own steam and on our own timescale, than waiting for the rest of the EU to adopt it and leaving us out in the economic cold. All other non-Euro EU states are legally obliged to join the Euro - we are the only state with an opt-out. Sure - it was a wise political move on the part of New Labour to negotiate that opt-out, but ultimately it is meaningless. When the rest of Europe is trading in the Euro towards the middle of the century, and we are economically isolated by our free-floating currency, we won't be looking so smug about having a sovereign currency.

    Oh, and if anyone thinks that the "referendum" promised to us in 1997 on the question of adopting it will make a difference, you have only to look at the veritable glut of referenda held on the European Constitution and the Lisbon Treaty to realise what's going to happen. Labour or Conservative - when the time comes you won't get a say.
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    It is a bit of a pity really. I think this is something whipped up by politicians so they can have more power. In reality it's probably best if we depossessed our political class of such power so they are forced to use more sensible policies as they can't print their way out of a tight corner any more. More power or "independence" isn't always a good thing. Power is best shared.
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    The whole euro project could fall apart in the near future if Greece doesn’t get its act together
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    (Original post by Aphotic Cosmos)
    Mostly because the majority of our important trading partners are in the Eurozone, partly because Britain needs to wake up and realise that it doesn't have a future as a nation apart from Europe - and accepting things like the Euro will have to come sooner or later. The fact that the Euro is now the most traded and powerful currency in the world couldn't hurt the case to adopt it, as well.

    There will come a point when we adopt the Euro - that is unquestionable. Whether through choice or economic necessity is debatable. I simply think that we would be better off adopting the Euro under our own steam and on our own timescale, than waiting for the rest of the EU to adopt it and leaving us out in the economic cold. All other non-Euro EU states are legally obliged to join the Euro - we are the only state with an opt-out. Sure - it was a wise political move on the part of New Labour to negotiate that opt-out, but ultimately it is meaningless. When the rest of Europe is trading in the Euro towards the middle of the century, and we are economically isolated by our free-floating currency, we won't be looking so smug about having a sovereign currency.

    Oh, and if anyone thinks that the "referendum" promised to us in 1997 on the question of adopting it will make a difference, you have only to look at the veritable glut of referenda held on the European Constitution and the Lisbon Treaty to realise what's going to happen. Labour or Conservative - when the time comes you won't get a say.
    Sweden? Denmark?
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    (Original post by Renner)
    The whole euro project could fall apart in the near future if Greece doesn’t get its act together
    Why Greece in particular? lol
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    (Original post by SunOfABeach)
    Sweden? Denmark?
    Denmark is holding a referendum on joining the Euro, but they only have a de facto opt out. They are still legally obliged to join.

    Sweden is another de facto opt out case, although they aren't holding a referendum at the moment.

    The UK is the only EU country with a de jure opt-out - in other words, we are the only country that legally doesn't have to adopt it at any point. Sweden and Denmark could get away with it technically, but would probably have to fight it on a legal level.
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    (Original post by SunOfABeach)
    Why Greece in particular? lol
    read the news?
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    (Original post by loki276)
    read the news?
    No why don't you fill me in?
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    (Original post by ak56)
    The UK is probably the least culturally aware country in Europe, most British people are obsessed with political correctness and spout things like "WE'RE A DIVERSE COUNTRY, "THERE IS NO BRITISH CULTURE YOU RACIST BIGOT HOW DARE YOU!", they avoid flying flags, any display of overt patriotism makes you a racist or a weirdo and any attempt at mature discussion of immigration policy makes you a Nazi, fascist or KKK member.

    With the climate in the UK concerning matters of patriotism, why the hell does the pound matter so much to people? If patriotism is generally frowned upon in this country, why the hell does the pound matter so much? British people are hardly culturally aware, so does it even matter?

    Surely the Euro goes quite well with the idea of diversity and open border policies? Most British people avoid any display of patriotism, yet when the pound is mentioned they come out all-flag flying and "British is best", etc.
    How is wanting to keep the pound patriotism? I was born in Holland and the euro was introduced around 1999/2000. No one asked for it, the government just decided that was for the best. Following years prices literaly DUBBELED because many shops took advantage of people not knowing how much the euro actually was worth. Surely it's very easy if you travel around europe and it saves you money as you don't need to pay to change your currency but if I had the choice I would like the old Dutch Guilder back and I'm FAR from being patriotic!
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    Another reason is that most children can't add up using the currecny we're using at the moment, imagine the mess we'd be in having to reform it all.


    Besides, why can't the UK hold onto the little but of cultural heritage we still have?
    Joining the Euro would simply result in France and Germany dictating a Europe tax on bank accounts.
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    (Original post by SunOfABeach)
    No why don't you fill me in?

    Greece has debt crisis

    German refuses to bail

    investors taking out money

    EU starts to lay down plans for loans along with IMF

    investors still take away money


    ring any bells?

    Basically Greece turning into Argentina 2001
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    (Original post by paddyman4)
    So that we can set our own monetary policy. The Bank of England is probably the best national bank in the world and needs to make choices for our country, not the EU central bank. We were free to devalue our currency through quantitative easing, a necessity in recent times. Were we part of the Euro, we would not have that freedom: we would be forced to endure the same monetary policy set for a group of countries with completely different economies to each other and to us.

    Yes.
    And don't forget that while the BoE is property of the state, the EU central bank is property of....other national central banks....that are property of private banks....that are property of private individuals.
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    (Original post by paddyman4)
    So that we can set our own monetary policy
    This.

    Anything that is remotely 'patriotically-related' in this country is often still there because it brings benefits. We're not a nostalgia nation.
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    (Original post by loki276)
    Greece has debt crisis

    German refuses to bail

    investors taking out money

    EU starts to lay down plans for loans along with IMF

    investors still take away money


    ring any bells?

    Basically Greece turning into Argentina 2001
    ******** anyone? Greece is a ****** country, no doubt. But it is not the ********* out of the original 15 European countries (I dont' wanna count the new Eastern European countries...). By any measure. Be it deficit or public debt or inflation -- Greece is NOT the greatest problem in the EU right now for you to dump the problems of the Euro on her. There's Ireland (with the highest deficit), there's Italy (with the largest public debt) and there's Belgium (highest inflation). Greece is very close no doubt but not the Queen by any measure.
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    (Original post by SunOfABeach)
    ******** anyone? Greece is a ****** country, no doubt. But it is not the ********* out of the original 15 European countries (I dont' wanna count the new Eastern European countries...). By any measure. Be it deficit or public debt or inflation -- Greece is NOT the greatest problem in the EU right now for you to dump the problems of the Euro on her. There's Ireland (with the highest deficit), there's Italy (with the largest public debt) and there's Belgium (highest inflation). Greece is very close no doubt but not the Queen by any measure.
    Its the one in the media therefore it is the most ******

    it has crap credit rating and will either default on its loans or need loans from EU

    Other countries have better credit rating than Greece and can get loans more easily
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    (Original post by TheMeister)
    This.

    Anything that is remotely 'patriotically-related' in this country is often still there because it brings benefits. We're not a nostalgia nation.
    Except for all the incessant whining about how things viewed as traditionally British being either abandoned or taken over by foreign interests? Cadbury's is a superb example. There are sound commercial reasons to worry about Kraft taking over Cadbury's, but the national media rolled out sentimentalist headlines evoking nostalgic feelings - focusing on how American chocolate [which is quite a broad generalisation] is apparently crap, and how it is a part of British heritage, etc.

    We are very much a nostalgic nation. We have nothing to look forward to, or at least large portions of the media would have us believe that, and thus many Brits seek solace in how things used to be.
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    (Original post by Christian_j)
    Because we can use the phrase 'sound as a pound'.

    Also, because 'Euroland' and 'The Euro Shop' don't have the same ring to them.
    It's the 2 Euro shop in Ireland. That's even worse.
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    (Original post by loki276)
    Its the one in the media therefore it is the most ******

    it has crap credit rating and will either default on its loans or need loans from EU

    Other countries have better credit rating than Greece and can get loans more easily
    Flawless logic.

    And Greece's low credit rating is not the prime reason for the devaluation of the Euro as the guy you quoted and agreed with suggested. So do me a favour and do your own research instead of spouting crappy media junk news.
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    Because we're not part of mainland Europe

    Fairly obvious really

    EDIT: That said, will the recent credit crisis push us closer toward the Euro, or further away?
 
 
 
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