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    I've always wanted to go so I think I'm going to do it this summer. I'll be travelling alone or possibly with some friends.
    I've already found cheapish flights to Japan but I'm not going to book just yet. I'll be going in May/June.

    Updated:
    I'm only going to Japan now for 3 weeks

    So my questions are:
    - who's been? what was it like?
    - how much spending money did you take?
    - was the rail system easy enough in japan?
    - what HAS to be seen/done/eaten? (I'm already looking forward to the bento lunches and sushi!)
    - what to avoid?
    - is two weeks enough to travel the length of japan?
    - did you stay in a hostel or expensive hotel or the budget ones the japanese themselves use?
    - did you experience the night life partying etc? what was that like?

    Any other tips/hints/advice are welcome. plsthx.:woo::woo::eek3::yep:
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    (Original post by La Trampa)
    I've always wanted to go so I think I'm going to do it this summer. I'll be travelling alone or possibly with some friends.
    I've already found cheapish flights to Japan but I'm not going to book just yet. I'll be going in May/June.
    My main interest is Japan but thinking of stopping over in Hong Kong and Taiwan for a couple of days before spending about 2 weeks travelling most of Japan (north and south plus the little islands). This is subject to change but my main interest is Japan and I may scrap the other two.

    So my questions are (for all destinations if possible):
    - who's been? what was it like?
    - how much spending money did you take?
    - was the rail system easy enough in japan?
    - what HAS to be seen/done/eaten? (I'm already looking forward to the bento lunches and sushi!)
    - what to avoid?
    - is two weeks enough to travel the length of japan?
    - did you stay in a hostel or expensive hotel or the budget ones the japanese themselves use?
    - did you experience the night life partying etc? what was that like?

    Any other tips/hints/advice are welcome. plsthx.:woo::woo::eek3::yep:


    Wooow sounds great, I'm jealous!

    I've been to Japan so I can give you advice on that.
    It's fabulousa and totally worth it! You might get a lot of people trying to talk to you as you're foreign, but they're 99% lovely.

    May/June should be fantastic - just when the sakura are progressing and the weather is warm but not boiling. In the more Southern areas you might want to watch out for the weather - Last year I went for a day in Miyajima (off Hiroshima) and got super sunburnt in May!

    If you speak at least basic Japanese the rail system is easy enough and relatively simple - Even though it looks absolutely terrifying at first! In each station above the ticket machines there's a big map showing each line and each stop, all in Japanese and in the bigger stations in Romaji.
    I'd make sure you know the basic Kanji for the stations you'll be going to in case they don't have it. Train station staff are very handy if you get stuck though - they do their best to speak English if you can't speak Japanese.

    Hmm I'll have to give some advice later on the 'must-see's because there's too many to narrow it down just now! Depends on where you're going. I'd say you have to experience City and Countryside for the sheer shock of difference. Walk around at night in the cities (especially Tokyo where it's safest) to experience the amazerous relaxed atmosphere of an evening :p:

    Avoid occasional pervy old men...but I guess that goes for every country!

    Two weeks is a good tester time - but if you want to travel the entire length reasonably thoroughly I'd say more like 3 weeks to a month, there's just SO much to do. If you're fine with very little sleep and really whizzing through places two weeks should be fine though to just about 'cover' everything.
    I stayed in relatively expensive hotels around the country, but to be honest I'd recommend just staying in hostels or budget hotels, since they're all good enough.
    I didn't go to any clubs, but I sat in one bar where I got lots of attention for being foreign, and discovered that the Japanese are serious lightweights! lol :o: Just make sure to visit larger clubs and not the dodgy ones with gambling and stuff going on.

    Gahhh I'm all nostalgic now. Serious wanderlust!!
    :woo:

    If you've got any more questions feel free to ask!

    And sorry I kind of wrote you a massive essay...lol.
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    (Original post by Rananagirl)
    Wooow sounds great, I'm jealous!

    I've been to Japan so I can give you advice on that.
    It's fabulousa and totally worth it! You might get a lot of people trying to talk to you as you're foreign, but they're 99% lovely.

    May/June should be fantastic - just when the sakura are progressing and the weather is warm but not boiling. In the more Southern areas you might want to watch out for the weather - Last year I went for a day in Miyajima (off Hiroshima) and got super sunburnt in May!

    If you speak at least basic Japanese the rail system is easy enough and relatively simple - Even though it looks absolutely terrifying at first! In each station above the ticket machines there's a big map showing each line and each stop, all in Japanese and in the bigger stations in Romaji.
    I'd make sure you know the basic Kanji for the stations you'll be going to in case they don't have it. Train station staff are very handy if you get stuck though - they do their best to speak English if you can't speak Japanese.

    Hmm I'll have to give some advice later on the 'must-see's because there's too many to narrow it down just now! Depends on where you're going. I'd say you have to experience City and Countryside for the sheer shock of difference. Walk around at night in the cities (especially Tokyo where it's safest) to experience the amazerous relaxed atmosphere of an evening

    Avoid occasional pervy old men...but I guess that goes for every country!

    Two weeks is a good tester time - but if you want to travel the entire length reasonably thoroughly I'd say more like 3 weeks to a month, there's just SO much to do. If you're fine with very little sleep and really whizzing through places two weeks should be fine though to just about 'cover' everything.
    I stayed in relatively expensive hotels around the country, but to be honest I'd recommend just staying in hostels or budget hotels, since they're all good enough.
    I didn't go to any clubs, but I sat in one bar where I got lots of attention for being foreign, and discovered that the Japanese are serious lightweights! lol Just make sure to visit larger clubs and not the dodgy ones with gambling and stuff going on.

    Gahhh I'm all nostalgic now. Serious wanderlust!!


    If you've got any more questions feel free to ask!

    And sorry I kind of wrote you a massive essay...lol.
    Thank you!
    I'm doing the washing up at the moment and typing with one hand but will be back to grill you!
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    I went to Tokyo for a month in march last year and I can tell you it was amazing! As for accomodation, I stayed in a hostel for the entire month and loved it. (even though i was sharing a room with 7 other people) If you stay in hostels, then you'll meet people from all over the world! I travelled mostly with a guy a met there who was from Belgium, but I also went to watch a baseball game with an american guy on my 3rd day.

    Food! Tempura and Gyuudon (Yoshinoya) the tempura is amazing and well gyudon... I love it, but others hate it If you worry about food though, just go to what I call comfort zone... (McDonalds) theyre pretty much everywhere.

    For one month I'd saved up £3000, but that included: Return tickets there and back, Accomodation for the entire month, a weeks worth of Japan rail pass (a must get if you plan on using bullet trains) and spending money (food souvenirs, clubbing etc.) OH! if you plan on going clubbing or anything make sure to take ID with you... I witnessed a 50 year old getting ID'd on the door to club Womb.

    The rail system is confusing at first; however, you do get used to it in about a week or so and it's very efficient.

    Definately go to Asakusa in Tokyo to see the Sensoji Temple it's pretty big.. also go to Kamakura to see the giant buddha statue.

    I'm not sure about having 2 weeks to travel then entirety of Japan... I didn't even get to see everything of Tokyo in a month

    Nightlife is pretty cool no matter what music you like... as long as you're drunk enough. I'm into rock, punk, metal etc, but sadly I couldn't find any clubs in Japan that play that kind of music. The only clubs I could find were hip-hop/RnB clubs and one drum and bass club.

    Anyway, I'd definately go again, and if I get my way this year and get into uni then I'll probably move there when I finish my degree.
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    Heya!
    I went summer 2008 for two weeks and it was a blast! We managed Tokyo, Kyoto, Nara and Osaka in two weeks, with a week pass for the bullet train. I can't recommend these enough - make sure you get a JR pass as it makes travelling up and down the country much cheaper and easier! They seem expensive at first but it does work out cheaper and it's very worth it. I'm not sure if you'd manage the whole length of Japan in two weeks, we comfortably managed the above cities in that time, it might be too much to cram everthing in.
    The rail system is very easy. Make sure you get on the right trains (a good guidebook will tell you which ones - some take very roundabout routes, we got on one that took 40 stops when it should have been 2!!!) and the JR pass doesn't cover all trains, such as 1st class etc. Tokyo subway is rediculously easy, you can buy a cheap 100 yen ticket before boarding for however far you want to go, then use a machine at the end that calculates how much extra you have to pay to cover the distance. If you're going at rush hour (which is insane, try not to), they have women-only carriages if you're worried about "chikan".
    I can't remember exactly how much I took - I saved about £1000 for expenses and souvenirs. I think I spent about £500 of it, but that was sharing the cost of food, hostels etc. I'd advise taking cash and being very careful with it. We tried using international cash machines and it was very very complicated and stressful when they didn't work... Japan can be expensive. Eating out is about the same as here (American guidebooks say it's more expensive but compared to here it's about the same) though the plane and JR tickets are not! There are plenty of opportunities to shop too, the temples are surrounded by souvenir stands and Tokyo is heaven. If you like Studio Ghibli, I advise checking out Loft - it's a lovely stationery/gift shop that provided loads of souvenirs for people back home.
    In Tokyo and Kyoto we stayed at K's House - which is awesome, a very good hostel chain with nice staff, well situated and good opportunity to meet other travellers, can't recommend enough! Osaka we managed on a day trip, and in Nara we stayed in Guest House Yougendo, a cheap-ish Ryokan style hotel run by an englishman. Very very nice, even though we were in the western style rooms it was a great experience. Didn't do much partying as the daytime sightseeing knackered us out, but staying in a hostel is a good idea as we had a few nights drinking with other people staying there. The problem with budget hotels, specifically capsule hotels, is that they're men only. Lots of them only accept Japanese travellers too.
    Here's a list of the best things we did:
    NARA: Check out Todai-ji and see the massive Buddha. Lots of deer!
    KYOTO: We were lucky to see Geisha here walking in Gion five times. Best place for temples and culture, best of the best was the Fushimi Inari shrine with hundreds of Torii gates, try and walk it! We didn't and I really regret it. Kiyomizu temple is also unmissable. Nishiki market is excellent, though avoid tasting the pickled stuff Iwatayama monkey park is good too.
    OSAKA: Managed this in a day but we probably missed out on some good stuff. Shopping is alright and it's amazing seeing all the massive buildings and bright lights.
    TOKYO: Where to begin! Oeno zoo, pandas! The temple in Oeno park is good too. Shibuya, Harajuku, Tsukiji fish market... wonderful for shopping. Ghibli museum is nearby plus Sanrio Puroland and Disneyland, though we didn't go to any of these Make sure you have sushi here, it's glorious.
    I'd advise learning a few key phrases (please, thankyou, directions etc) as not many people are good english speakers, and they really appreciate people trying to speak Japanese. Prepare to be stared at, we had people sneaking photos of us as we walked down the street. Also, if you're vegetarian or have any kind of allergy learn those phrases off by heart as they're not used to these things and there's not always good vegetarian options - there are some great sites online that can point out vegetarian specific restaurants. Food can be annoying at times, I'm not used to gory sushi with lots of tentacles and it's awful on hangover. Most menus aren't specific enough in english to know exactly what you're getting (raw horse, AVOID AVOID!!) McDonalds was, I'm embarrassed to say, a lifesaver. However, there is something for everyone and there were only a few dodgy sushi moments compared to loads of awesome meals over the whole two weeks. It may seem daunting at first, but Japan is very easy to navigate, the people are friendly and although it's all very different, it's a great place to go. Japanese signs will almost always have english characters underneath, so it's not that bad if you're uncomfortable with the language (which I definitely wasn't, kanji???)
    I'm very very jealous, it's a trip of a lifetime Hope you have a great time, sorry about the essay! If you want to check out my touristy photos, they're here: http://www.facebook.com/album.php?ai...1&id=504756233
    Good luck organizing it, it sounds brilliant!
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    (Original post by La Trampa)
    Thank you!
    I'm doing the washing up at the moment and typing with one hand but will be back to grill you!
    Okies
    Forgot to add them but here's my pictures too.
    http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?pid=711412&id=50475623 3#!/album.php?aid=165&id=1617630007

    Although Poodlesheep's are much better!

    :woo:
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    No advice (never been there) but man am I jealous, I've always wanted to go!! Damn dissertation draining my life away :mad: Have fun though!!
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    (Original post by Rananagirl)
    Wooow sounds great, I'm jealous!

    I've been to Japan so I can give you advice on that.
    It's fabulousa and totally worth it! You might get a lot of people trying to talk to you as you're foreign, but they're 99% lovely.

    May/June should be fantastic - just when the sakura are progressing and the weather is warm but not boiling. In the more Southern areas you might want to watch out for the weather - Last year I went for a day in Miyajima (off Hiroshima) and got super sunburnt in May!

    If you speak at least basic Japanese the rail system is easy enough and relatively simple - Even though it looks absolutely terrifying at first! In each station above the ticket machines there's a big map showing each line and each stop, all in Japanese and in the bigger stations in Romaji.
    I'd make sure you know the basic Kanji for the stations you'll be going to in case they don't have it. Train station staff are very handy if you get stuck though - they do their best to speak English if you can't speak Japanese.

    Hmm I'll have to give some advice later on the 'must-see's because there's too many to narrow it down just now! Depends on where you're going. I'd say you have to experience City and Countryside for the sheer shock of difference. Walk around at night in the cities (especially Tokyo where it's safest) to experience the amazerous relaxed atmosphere of an evening

    Avoid occasional pervy old men...but I guess that goes for every country!

    Two weeks is a good tester time - but if you want to travel the entire length reasonably thoroughly I'd say more like 3 weeks to a month, there's just SO much to do. If you're fine with very little sleep and really whizzing through places two weeks should be fine though to just about 'cover' everything.
    I stayed in relatively expensive hotels around the country, but to be honest I'd recommend just staying in hostels or budget hotels, since they're all good enough.
    I didn't go to any clubs, but I sat in one bar where I got lots of attention for being foreign, and discovered that the Japanese are serious lightweights! lol Just make sure to visit larger clubs and not the dodgy ones with gambling and stuff going on.

    Gahhh I'm all nostalgic now. Serious wanderlust!!


    If you've got any more questions feel free to ask!

    And sorry I kind of wrote you a massive essay...lol.
    Thanks for all the essays guys, keep them coming! The more info I get the better!

    Re: expenses. I'm only interested in food, transport, maybe accommodation etc. My plane ticket for Japan will be bought before hand and I've found it for less than £600 which is good. My plane tickets to Taiwan and HK (if I go) will be bought when I'm there as they're a lot cheaper over there!

    I don't speak a lot of japanese, very few random words but I'm going to get a lonely planet guide and study it like I have exams on it! Also I'll be taking it everywhere with me so I can point out stuff to people if I need to.
    I fully intend to use the rail system to travel everywhere possible, if I can get on the bullet train too that would be awesome! I don't need to go 1st class, I'd just be happy to be there! How much is the week pass?

    Could you tell me what the must sees are? Although the plan is to go from one end of japan to another and then the mini islands, I/we're obviously not going to go to every city/town, just major places or places of interest for a day or 2 so we can squeeze loads in but I/we definitely want to experience city and country life.

    A question I forgot, I'm presuming internet access was easy enough? :rolleyes:
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    (Original post by Rananagirl)
    Okies
    Forgot to add them but here's my pictures too.
    http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?pid=711412&id=50475623 3#!/album.php?aid=165&id=1617630007

    Although Poodlesheep's are much better!

    It's not letting look at you album
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    (Original post by californiadreamin)
    No advice (never been there) but man am I jealous, I've always wanted to go!! Damn dissertation draining my life away Have fun though!!
    Thanks. I'm going for a part holiday, part dissertation topic research. (If I go before the dissertation is due).
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    I can't comment on Japan and Hong Kong, but I come from Taiwan. If you want excitement, don't go to the small cities, e.g. Kaohsiung, go Taipei instead, otherwise it's just a waste of time. Food is just the usual Chinese food tbh. There's not that much excitement going down. You can visit the 101 Tower, but that's just a shopping centre really.

    Fun fact: Taipei 101 is called 101 because of it's door number, not because of how many floors it has.
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    I'm planning a trip for next year, I kind of stole the advice meant for you... I am so excited!!!
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    (Original post by Kukukichu)
    I went to Tokyo for a month in march last year and I can tell you it was amazing! As for accomodation, I stayed in a hostel for the entire month and loved it. (even though i was sharing a room with 7 other people) If you stay in hostels, then you'll meet people from all over the world! I travelled mostly with a guy a met there who was from Belgium, but I also went to watch a baseball game with an american guy on my 3rd day.

    Food! Tempura and Gyuudon (Yoshinoya) the tempura is amazing and well gyudon... I love it, but others hate it If you worry about food though, just go to what I call comfort zone... (McDonalds) theyre pretty much everywhere.

    For one month I'd saved up £3000, but that included: Return tickets there and back, Accomodation for the entire month, a weeks worth of Japan rail pass (a must get if you plan on using bullet trains) and spending money (food souvenirs, clubbing etc.) OH! if you plan on going clubbing or anything make sure to take ID with you... I witnessed a 50 year old getting ID'd on the door to club Womb.

    The rail system is confusing at first; however, you do get used to it in about a week or so and it's very efficient.

    definitely go to Asakusa in Tokyo to see the Sensoji Temple it's pretty big.. also go to Kamakura to see the giant buddha statue.

    I'm not sure about having 2 weeks to travel then entirety of Japan... I didn't even get to see everything of Tokyo in a month

    Nightlife is pretty cool no matter what music you like... as long as you're drunk enough. I'm into rock, punk, metal etc, but sadly I couldn't find any clubs in Japan that play that kind of music. The only clubs I could find were hip-hop/RnB clubs and one drum and bass club.

    Anyway, I'd definitely go again, and if I get my way this year and get into uni then I'll probably move there when I finish my degree.
    I love gyudon, I can't wait to taste the authentic stuff. I can't wait to taste proper real sushi and real bentos and everything mmmmmm *drool* But yes I may pop in to mcdonalds (shock horror!) just to sample it. Thanks so much
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    (Original post by Jingers)
    I can't comment on Japan and Hong Kong, but I come from Taiwan. If you want excitement, don't go to the small cities, e.g. Kaohsiung, go Taipei instead, otherwise it's just a waste of time. Food is just the usual Chinese food tbh. There's not that much excitement going down. You can visit the 101 Tower, but that's just a shopping centre really.

    Fun fact: Taipei 101 is called 101 because of it's door number, not because of how many floors it has.
    Cool thanks. I'd only be there for like 2-3 days at the most and will be seeing some friends I have there so they'd know what to show me. I'd want to go to one of the fish markets though I think.
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    (Original post by poodlesheep)
    Heya!
    I went summer 2008 for two weeks and it was a blast! We managed Tokyo, Kyoto, Nara and Osaka in two weeks, with a week pass for the bullet train. I can't recommend these enough - make sure you get a JR pass as it makes travelling up and down the country much cheaper and easier! They seem expensive at first but it does work out cheaper and it's very worth it. I'm not sure if you'd manage the whole length of Japan in two weeks, we comfortably managed the above cities in that time, it might be too much to cram everthing in.
    The rail system is very easy. Make sure you get on the right trains (a good guidebook will tell you which ones - some take very roundabout routes, we got on one that took 40 stops when it should have been 2!!!) and the JR pass doesn't cover all trains, such as 1st class etc. Tokyo subway is rediculously easy, you can buy a cheap 100 yen ticket before boarding for however far you want to go, then use a machine at the end that calculates how much extra you have to pay to cover the distance. If you're going at rush hour (which is insane, try not to), they have women-only carriages if you're worried about "chikan".
    I can't remember exactly how much I took - I saved about £1000 for expenses and souvenirs. I think I spent about £500 of it, but that was sharing the cost of food, hostels etc. I'd advise taking cash and being very careful with it. We tried using international cash machines and it was very very complicated and stressful when they didn't work... Japan can be expensive. Eating out is about the same as here (American guidebooks say it's more expensive but compared to here it's about the same) though the plane and JR tickets are not! There are plenty of opportunities to shop too, the temples are surrounded by souvenir stands and Tokyo is heaven. If you like Studio Ghibli, I advise checking out Loft - it's a lovely stationery/gift shop that provided loads of souvenirs for people back home.
    In Tokyo and Kyoto we stayed at K's House - which is awesome, a very good hostel chain with nice staff, well situated and good opportunity to meet other travellers, can't recommend enough! Osaka we managed on a day trip, and in Nara we stayed in Guest House Yougendo, a cheap-ish Ryokan style hotel run by an englishman. Very very nice, even though we were in the western style rooms it was a great experience. Didn't do much partying as the daytime sightseeing knackered us out, but staying in a hostel is a good idea as we had a few nights drinking with other people staying there. The problem with budget hotels, specifically capsule hotels, is that they're men only. Lots of them only accept Japanese travellers too.
    Here's a list of the best things we did:
    NARA: Check out Todai-ji and see the massive Buddha. Lots of deer!
    KYOTO: We were lucky to see Geisha here walking in Gion five times. Best place for temples and culture, best of the best was the Fushimi Inari shrine with hundreds of Torii gates, try and walk it! We didn't and I really regret it. Kiyomizu temple is also unmissable. Nishiki market is excellent, though avoid tasting the pickled stuff Iwatayama monkey park is good too.
    OSAKA: Managed this in a day but we probably missed out on some good stuff. Shopping is alright and it's amazing seeing all the massive buildings and bright lights.
    TOKYO: Where to begin! Oeno zoo, pandas! The temple in Oeno park is good too. Shibuya, Harajuku, Tsukiji fish market... wonderful for shopping. Ghibli museum is nearby plus Sanrio Puroland and Disneyland, though we didn't go to any of these Make sure you have sushi here, it's glorious.
    I'd advise learning a few key phrases (please, thankyou, directions etc) as not many people are good english speakers, and they really appreciate people trying to speak Japanese. Prepare to be stared at, we had people sneaking photos of us as we walked down the street. Also, if you're vegetarian or have any kind of allergy learn those phrases off by heart as they're not used to these things and there's not always good vegetarian options - there are some great sites online that can point out vegetarian specific restaurants. Food can be annoying at times, I'm not used to gory sushi with lots of tentacles and it's awful on hangover. Most menus aren't specific enough in english to know exactly what you're getting (raw horse, AVOID AVOID!!) McDonalds was, I'm embarrassed to say, a lifesaver. However, there is something for everyone and there were only a few dodgy sushi moments compared to loads of awesome meals over the whole two weeks. It may seem daunting at first, but Japan is very easy to navigate, the people are friendly and although it's all very different, it's a great place to go. Japanese signs will almost always have english characters underneath, so it's not that bad if you're uncomfortable with the language (which I definitely wasn't, kanji???)
    I'm very very jealous, it's a trip of a lifetime Hope you have a great time, sorry about the essay! If you want to check out my touristy photos, they're here: http://www.facebook.com/album.php?ai...1&id=504756233
    Good luck organizing it, it sounds brilliant!
    Lovely pics thanks
    How much was the pass at the time? I presume you had to get a new one each week or was it just a matte of topping up?

    Thanks so much for all the other info though! :hugs: argh i'm getting excited just thinking about it!!! :woo::eek3::yep::woo::woo:
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    Ooh, Japan, I'm so jealous!
    I went to Hong Kong last summer, and I can tell you it's amazing.
    Make sure you visit the Ladies Market, The Buddha and of course, Disney Land!
    Everyone's really friendly and mostly speak English, or at least try!
    Do you have any particular questions? Just quote me with them and I'll try to do my best.
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    I would visit HK, well worth visiting. I personally prefer HK to Tokyo. I dunno about Taiwan. Why would one visit Taiwan? (I haven't been, so someone please tell me!)





    So my questions are (for all destinations if possible):
    - who's been? what was it like? Japan: liked, found it hard to get around as an English speaker. HK: love. Good food in both. HK food better.
    - how much spending money did you take? You'll need LOTS. Japan and HK are expensive cf poorer southeast asian countries.
    - was the rail system easy enough in japan?
    - what HAS to be seen/done/eaten? (I'm already looking forward to the bento lunches and sushi!) eat lots of local food. In HK: tea at the Peninsula, Star Ferry habour ride, shop at Mong Kok markets, Pacific Place and the IFC mall. Check out Stanley, the Peak, Ocean Park, hiking in the countryside, boating to small islands, seafood at Sai Kung. The HK tourism board has lots of tips and free events for tourists. Eat lots of dim sum, egg tarts, seafood, iced milk tea, soy milk, sushi, japanese, korean, thai and vietnamese food - all are v good in hk.
    - what to avoid? fake rolexes (from guys on nathan road, fine to buy from proper shops), overpriced cameras, day trips to shenzhen
    - is two weeks enough to travel the length of japan? doubt it
    - did you stay in a hostel or expensive hotel or the budget ones the japanese themselves use? japan - 3-4 star hotels. hk 4-5 star hotels. hotels.com, laterooms.com, booking.com have v good deals
    - did you experience the night life partying etc? what was that like? doesn't stop

    Any other tips/hints/advice are welcome. plsthx.
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    If you go to Hong Kong, I would visit the markets. I visited the ladies market in mongkok, kowloon, its easy to take the metro there. It's very lively market and known for selling fakes, they also close at midnight! So great for a bit of late night shopping after visiting other touristy places. If you want to buy anything be sure to haggle like crazy. They usually overcharge the locals a bit, but they will try overcharge foreign people a lot. They do know a bit of English, and sometimes they may just use their calculators to show you the price. So have fun with haggling.

    You might also want to visit the big buddha. I haven't been, but looking on a few websites I see you can get taking the metro and a bus.

    If you're going to be using the metro a lot, you may want to buy an octopus travel card for convenience.
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    (Original post by La Trampa)
    Lovely pics thanks
    How much was the pass at the time? I presume you had to get a new one each week or was it just a matte of topping up?

    Thanks so much for all the other info though! :hugs: argh i'm getting excited just thinking about it!!! :woo::eek3::yep::woo::woo:
    Cheers! Sorry about all the comedy engrish photos :P
    We just got one pass for about £200 which we activated first day, then started using three days in. It was only a 7 day pass, and you need to activate it asap (though the 7 days start after the first time you use it). That was enough really - 5 days Tokyo (no pass), 4 days Kyoto, 2 days Nara and 1 day Osaka on the pass, then two days after in Tokyo to round it off. Wish we had more time in Kyoto though It includes bullet train which is diamond! 2hrs to get from Tokyo to Kyoto is magic. The passes are so good that Japanese people are jealous of it apparently - it's only available to international visitors.
    I'm planning on going back next year Was only going to go for a week and a half but all this makes me want to go for longer! When are you thinking of going?
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    (Original post by La Trampa)
    I've always wanted to go so I think I'm going to do it this summer. I'll be travelling alone or possibly with some friends.
    I've already found cheapish flights to Japan but I'm not going to book just yet. I'll be going in May/June.
    My main interest is Japan but thinking of stopping over in Hong Kong and Taiwan for a couple of days before spending about 2 weeks travelling most of Japan (north and south plus the little islands). This is subject to change but my main interest is Japan and I may scrap the other two.

    So my questions are (for all destinations if possible):
    - who's been? what was it like?
    - how much spending money did you take?
    - was the rail system easy enough in japan?
    - what HAS to be seen/done/eaten? (I'm already looking forward to the bento lunches and sushi!)
    - what to avoid?
    - is two weeks enough to travel the length of japan?
    - did you stay in a hostel or expensive hotel or the budget ones the japanese themselves use?
    - did you experience the night life partying etc? what was that like?

    Any other tips/hints/advice are welcome. plsthx.:woo::woo::eek3::yep:

    i lived my 16 years of life in Hong Kong, so if you are still planning on going to Hong Kong, feel free to ask me anything^_^!!
 
 
 
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