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    I've heard the exact same thing so many times about St. Andrews!
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    (Original post by No Future)
    I disagree. Buses to Dundee are regular and convenient. Trains and buses to Edinburgh are the same.

    I have commuted to Edinburgh at least once/twice a week from St Andrews and never had any problems
    There is no train station in St Andrews - that's not remotely convenient. Realistically, having some buses and a railway line three villages over isn't really going to strike anyone as particularly effective.

    As it happens, I've used the St A's-Dundee bus before despite my utter distaste for buses - took at least 45 minutes, when you can drive it in 20.
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    (Original post by L i b)
    There is no train station in St Andrews - that's not remotely convenient. Realistically, having some buses and a railway line three villages over isn't really going to strike anyone as particularly effective.

    As it happens, I've used the St A's-Dundee bus before despite my utter distaste for buses - took at least 45 minutes, when you can drive it in 20.
    The Dundee bus takes ~20 minutes (I have got it many times), not 45 minutes. The train station is less than 10 minutes away by bus, and from most of the student halls you can walk to a bus stop in 5 minutes tops. In lots of other towns or cities you'd have to walk for longer than that to get to the train station, or get a bus anyway. It's not so bad, really.


    There are lots of easy ways to attack St Andrews, but poor transport links to Dundee and the train station in Leuchars are not accurate criticisms of the town.
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    (Original post by M_E_X)
    The Dundee bus takes ~20 minutes (I have got it many times), not 45 minutes. The train station is less than 10 minutes away by bus, and from most of the student halls you can walk to a bus stop in 5 minutes tops. In lots of other towns or cities you'd have to walk for longer than that to get to the train station, or get a bus anyway. It's not so bad, really.


    There are lots of easy ways to attack St Andrews, but poor transport links to Dundee and the train station in Leuchars are not accurate criticisms of the town.
    I agree take sheffield for example (purely because that's where I live at the moment), if you go to the university of sheffield its about a 20 minute bus journey to the train station from where you live, so 10 minutes is not a bad deal tbh.
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    (Original post by L i b)
    There is no train station in St Andrews - that's not remotely convenient. Realistically, having some buses and a railway line three villages over isn't really going to strike anyone as particularly effective.

    As it happens, I've used the St A's-Dundee bus before despite my utter distaste for buses - took at least 45 minutes, when you can drive it in 20.
    I agree, a train station in St Andrews would make it easier, but it's not difficult to get to Leuchars at all.

    Whenever I take the bus to Dundee, it's usually 30 mins, tops if there's really bad traffic. It's usually 20 or so

    I think that's pretty good. I've lived in London and a bus from Kings Cross to Waterloo (a 2.5 mile journey) takes at least 30mins, depending on traffic.

    My friends at UCL have to catch a bus to lectures and that takes at least 20 mins and they live closer to central than most students

    Bus to Leuchars takes 10 mins and arrives in time for the fast train to Edinburgh. Not difficult. Or taxi deal is £10.

    It sounds like you just dislike public transport, mate.

    There are some things I dislike about St Andrews, but local transport isn't really on my list.

    Also, your statement that there "a few" buses in incorrect. Go and stand at St Andrews bus station and there are several regular local and regional buses.
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    (Original post by M_E_X)
    The Dundee bus takes ~20 minutes (I have got it many times), not 45 minutes. The train station is less than 10 minutes away by bus, and from most of the student halls you can walk to a bus stop in 5 minutes tops. In lots of other towns or cities you'd have to walk for longer than that to get to the train station, or get a bus anyway. It's not so bad, really.


    There are lots of easy ways to attack St Andrews, but poor transport links to Dundee and the train station in Leuchars are not accurate criticisms of the town.
    This.

    I had a friend at Warwick and it was at least 15mins from the train station to campus and a 15 min walk to his halls
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    I have nothing to say about St. Andrews but I just wanted to defend Dundee...you said it has 'a few half decent shops', Dundee town centre has all the shops you find in a decent shopping centre/complex! Whenever we go (my mum's from there) we never get round to all the shops because there are so many! That is all...
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    i just read through the entire of this thread, its epic
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    (Original post by Milk <3)
    whats the ratio of yahs to non yahs? is it true most of them are in st salvadors? how does that work if you cant choose your accomo

    dont get me wrong im sure theyve lovely people, but i dont know if, as an upper-working class lad ill fit in!

    It's a stereotype and from the people I meet it's usually true. I'm from the middle to upper working class (typical Northern family) and I find that the "economic pyramid" of St Andrews' student population bulges in the middle - loads of middle class southerners and Americans, quite a few working class southerners and northerners tucked away in the further-away halls and only a few at either end - very few super-rich (they're usually in the KK so you avoid them, ooh, controversial) and very few people who could say they came from a very poor upbringing.
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    I can't believe its actually been a year since I started this thread...glad to see its still engendering some discussion- heres one thing I want to point out as well, I don't think I got this across clearly enough in my original post- its not just about the lack of shopping centres or nightclubs, its the general culture of the place and the attitudes of its people that bothers me, above everything else-

    i The lack of openness amongst people to others-

    People here rarely mix and mostly stick to whatever social groups they've cultivated. As a result, a lot of people, I think, come here and can feel extremely lonely and dissatisfied because of how stagnant things are socially-the lack of new people to meet, the anticlimactic social events and the general sense of things constantly being the same, week on week. Its draining experiencing a bit of what student life should be in places like Edinburgh, Bristol and Southampton where my friends go, and seeing how people mix and socialise and talk to oen and other freely and openly on nights out and coming back to St Andrews where people shoot each other disdainful looks and spend balls and social events pouting with their arms crossed amongst their groups of girlfriends. Its a place where despite how small it is, even people who elsewhere would have a great time can feel completely on their own or otherwise trapped in a stagnant social circle....

    ii 'High School' mentalitites.

    My friends at Bristol and Southampton were confused when I mentioned cliques, as they commented that at their institutions, everyone essentially socialises with each other- the architect students plan huge trips and nights out together, and a lot of people know each other and pretty much become friends by accident and via knowing others. Here, its very socially rigid in my experience- people limit themselves to people whom they percieve to be 'good enough' to hang out with and theres very little comradeship amongst fellow students to be witnessed- the atmosphere, even in tutorials, in my experience, is generally intense and competetive where it should be fun and bonding.

    iii Atmosphere on campus

    A lot of posturing and showing off goes on, the whole place can feel like a giant catwalk/pageant at times- for instance the majority of female students are almost indistinguishable from one and other because in desperation to fit in, so many of them wear the EXACT same outfit: black tights, wellies, a jacket and a (preferably desginer) handbag. I'm not kidding, I almost buckled to the pressure of trying it, because almost every female looks/dresses this way! The hemogeny of it can feel extremely alienating. In a regular university, the odd few dress up in Topshop to go to lectures but equally a lot of people are comfortable to wear hoodies and jeans on campus, here, girls get dressed up in designer gear and expensive outfits to go to Tescos.

    iv Snobbery

    Its been stated before, but there are a lot of upper middle class [and above] people- this is not ALL by any means, but certainly some- at the University who behave as though they own it, which if you're just an ordinary person from lower middle class or working class background, as I think most people in Britain are generally, it can make it difficult to find people whom you relate to. This snobbery is something I experienced last year in Halls in Andrew Melville, where people openly made rude comments about me as I was walking past- [American students whom I'd never spoken to], and others who used to, for instance, stretch themselves out in the middle of the corridor and refuse to move when someone approached, because they expected the person to merely step over their outstretched legs. Other common behvaiour included a designated clique occupying every seat in the public kitchens during mealtimes, and then proceeding to shoot suspicious glances at anyone else who entered.

    Anger at this sort of behaviour in particular is what partly led me to start this thread, its not just the lack of city-like attractions, its the arrongance and disdain that permeates the behaviour of quite a few people I've met here towards others here that can have you in tears. When I'm back home or in a city, I'm myself again because I'm surrounded by people who like myself, are open-minded and don;t feel the need to prove something I came here knowing it was small and not like a city, but was expecting a far better social atmosphere, thats my main complaint.
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    I just want to quickly add St Andrews always scores highly in student satisfaction (best in UK? or maybe I'm making that bit up). But evidently it cannot please all...
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    I like a peaceful town!

    but then again that's just me :embarrassed:
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    OP, if you wanted an ancient university North of the Border you should have gone to Glasgow :gthumb:.

    Starts sales pitch/
    It has the nice scenery (sans beach, but also sans the biting cold winds for most of term time), the prestige of being the fourth oldest university in the English-speaking world, the Russell Group membership, and the teaching isn't too shabby, and the examination standards are high (effectively 82% for a first). In fact, the only complaint that some people make is that they don't spend enough money on students, or that contact hours are low, but let's face it, employers expect people to be doing some self-study at university, spoon feeding belongs in school.
    /Ends sales pitch.

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    Mate, i'm from newcastle, sometimes you really cant be arsed to get mortz in town (10 mins from my house) sure i understand thats different if you've NEVER got any clubs to go too, but i think its all about the company you're in personally


    (STOP RUINING MY VIEW OF ST ANDREWS I HAVE AN INTERVIEW THERE IN 3 WEEKS MAN)

    PLZ
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    (Original post by MickJB1989)
    OP, if you wanted an ancient university North of the Border you should have gone to Glasgow :gthumb:.

    Starts sales pitch/
    It has the nice scenery (sans beach, but also sans the biting cold winds for most of term time), the prestige of being the fourth oldest university in the English-speaking world, the Russell Group membership, and the teaching isn't too shabby, and the examination standards are high (effectively 82% for a first). In fact, the only complaint that some people make is that they don't spend enough money on students, or that contact hours are low, but let's face it, employers expect people to be doing some self-study at university, spoon feeding belongs in school.
    /Ends sales pitch.

    Awaits negs
    3rd oldest


    (Original post by laurenl93)
    Mate, i'm from newcastle, sometimes you really cant be arsed to get mortz in town (10 mins from my house) sure i understand thats different if you've NEVER got any clubs to go too, but i think its all about the company you're in personally


    (STOP RUINING MY VIEW OF ST ANDREWS I HAVE AN INTERVIEW THERE IN 3 WEEKS MAN)

    PLZ
    Don't worry, that's only 1 persons experience. I'm sure that over the 600 years the university has been around, there are much much much MUCH more who had an amazing experience rather than a bad experience.
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    (Original post by Ecosse_14)
    3rd oldest
    Fourth oldest, created by Papal Bull in 1451, preceded by Oxford circa 1096, Cambridge 1209 and St. Andrews 1413
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    (Original post by MickJB1989)
    Fourth oldest, created by Papal Bull in 1451, preceded by Oxford, Cambridge and St. Andrews
    After reading your post again, I see you were talking about Glasgow :rolleyes:
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    (Original post by Ecosse_14)
    After reading your post again, I see you were talking about Glasgow :rolleyes:
    Lol, no worries :cool:
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    Interesting, I guess it shows the different cultures between universities.

    I'm only posting on here because my "friend" is in herfirst year at university and seemed utterly shocked about the fact I came home from a night out at 4am once. It didn't even seem horrifically unusual to me. Just makes sense now, that's all :p:
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    (Original post by LGF92)
    It's a stereotype and from the people I meet it's usually true. I'm from the middle to upper working class (typical Northern family) and I find that the "economic pyramid" of St Andrews' student population bulges in the middle - loads of middle class southerners and Americans, quite a few working class southerners and northerners tucked away in the further-away halls and only a few at either end - very few super-rich (they're usually in the KK so you avoid them, ooh, controversial) and very few people who could say they came from a very poor upbringing.
    when you say that does it mean 'popular types' who are cliquey with eachother, and all have amazing social skills?

    im hardly a social retard, far from it but normally those people wouldn't give you the time of day if youre nervous on the first day and act a little uncool!
    if thats what most people in catered halls are like i think ill be a loot happier at Van Mildert college durham!
 
 
 
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