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    (Original post by Cloven Angel)
    If getting smashed on frequent nights out and going shopping all the time is what's important to you then you should have applied to some crap university in a major city...
    Actually it's perfectly possible to do the first, especially if you join lots of sports- and the second too, though clearly it won't be a shopping experience to rival Oxford Street. But unless you have ridiculously high expectations then the high st will serve you pretty well Dundee's only a bus trip away and make friends with some Glaswegians and have a roadtrip together!
    the second half of your sentence is rather unfair though...
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    (Original post by Cloven Angel)
    maybe this sentiment is buried among the hundreds of other replies but ..
    yup. many, many times...
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    (Original post by xCHiiBiEverlastingx)
    Actually it's perfectly possible to do the first, especially if you join lots of sports- and the second too, though clearly it won't be a shopping experience to rival Oxford Street. But unless you have ridiculously high expectations then the high st will serve you pretty well Dundee's only a bus trip away and make friends with some Glaswegians and have a roadtrip together!
    the second half of your sentence is rather unfair though...
    Exactly. I know plenty of people here who manage to get very drunk very often, and the thing about sports teams is very true especially with the shinty team who (from that state my friend gets back in after their socials) seem to be very good at getting wasted.
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    Has anyone done a postgrad at St Andrews? Is there a decent postgrad community? The course that I want to do looks exceptional at St Andrews but I'm concerned about being isolated. It's a long long way from my family, and even London where I currently live. And also, I accept that there are no nightclubs etc, but I'd still like to be stimulated so if there aren't many things 'happening', I'm not going to be as happy.
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    My first visit to TSR in 2 years and one of the the first threads I read is this. Just want to put two cents in - I've not read any other replies so sorry for repeating what others have already said but I have just graduated from St Andrews this year and had to say that I had an amazing 4 years at St Andrews. There is lots to do and lots of events, it is a beautiful place and just generally is awesome. I miss it so much!
    Can't comment on the quality of teaching in Arts but I am fairly satisfied with my course (in biology) - could have been a bit better but I think university is also about the experience and what an experience studying at St Andrews is.
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    Umi:

    Unlike some others who have responded to your post, I appreciate your candid discussion of your feelings regarding St Andrews. That is the whole point of this message board. To hear the bad as well as the good. I don't think you should be condemned for it. For example, I went to Cornell University, and absolutely hated it. Most people would probably disagree with me on that point, including my brother's son, who started there in September, but if someone asked me about Cornell, including my own son, I would give him or her my honest opinion, just as you have. The mere fact you wrote the post, and your passion expressed in it, should be enough to at least people pause before blindly accepting admission to this college without knowing all the pros and cons.

    My son was just admitted, so I was particular interested in reading your post, and the responses to it. And getting more input from you, if you don't mind.

    I know it has been a year since you wrote your post. I am wondering if your feelings have changed in any respect. Also, since you evidently hate the place, I would appreciate it if you can mention in more detail any things you actually DO like about the place. What's good about it? And any advice you have for someone attending the school to "better" their experience there (other than the advice of not attending at all). Also, your impressions of how things are for Americans who attend. My son would be studying international relations. He is not a party person. He is not a big city kid. He has never had a drink, or smoken a cigarette. He is very intellectual, and I think would actually prefer being in the type of atmosphere you delineate in your post, going to the local pub with other students to talk about their classes. Also, he is a better than average looking guy. How, in general, is the social life for a reasonably good looking guy at St Andrews? Any thoughts on any of the above would be appreciated. Just as you don't make peace with your enemies, I think you might actually learn more about a college from someone who doesn't like it than from someone who loves it.

    Thanks for your help.
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    (Original post by floridadad55)
    Umi:

    Unlike some others who have responded to your post, I appreciate your candid discussion of your feelings regarding St Andrews. That is the whole point of this message board. To hear the bad as well as the good. I don't think you should be condemned for it. For example, I went to Cornell University, and absolutely hated it. Most people would probably disagree with me on that point, including my brother's son, who started there in September, but if someone asked me about Cornell, including my own son, I would give him or her my honest opinion, just as you have. The mere fact you wrote the post, and your passion expressed in it, should be enough to at least people pause before blindly accepting admission to this college without knowing all the pros and cons.

    My son was just admitted, so I was particular interested in reading your post, and the responses to it. And getting more input from you, if you don't mind.

    I know it has been a year since you wrote your post. I am wondering if your feelings have changed in any respect. Also, since you evidently hate the place, I would appreciate it if you can mention in more detail any things you actually DO like about the place. What's good about it? And any advice you have for someone attending the school to "better" their experience there (other than the advice of not attending at all). Also, your impressions of how things are for Americans who attend. My son would be studying international relations. He is not a party person. He is not a big city kid. He has never had a drink, or smoken a cigarette. He is very intellectual, and I think would actually prefer being in the type of atmosphere you delineate in your post, going to the local pub with other students to talk about their classes. Also, he is a better than average looking guy. How, in general, is the social life for a reasonably good looking guy at St Andrews? Any thoughts on any of the above would be appreciated. Just as you don't make peace with your enemies, I think you might actually learn more about a college from someone who doesn't like it than from someone who loves it.

    Thanks for your help.
    Can you tell me your experience and what you don't like about Cornell please?

    I have been to St. Andrews and I could understand your position as a parent and would gladly tell you about the city and some parts of the Uni (I'm not a student there though but I did want to go there ). I'm also not big on party and stuff so I could understand your son very well I think
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    kka25:

    You ask about Cornell, and why I hated itl. You must remember that is almost FORTY YEARS ago. My brother's kid is going there now, and he says that on a scale of 1 to 100, he gives it a 95, so he pretty much loves it, and he is a very popular, good looking, city wise kid from Boston. That being said:

    When I went to Cornell, the male female ratio was probably 70-30.

    Cornell is very cold, and is in the middle of nowhere. It is a beautiful campus, but you don't really notice it, or care, in the winter.

    I transferred in, and didn't join a frat, which was a big mistake.

    The friends I made my first year (who were freshman----I was a second semester sophomore) wound up all joining frats, so I was no longer part of their lives, other than perhaps seeing them in class or having lunch with them once in a while, when our paths crossed.

    Also, I didn't have a car.

    Also, I went to the School of Industrial & Labor Relations. It was not a subject I had any real interest in----it was just a way to go to Cornell for 1/2 price, as it is the state university part of Cornell. This was a "secret" way of getting into Cornell that it seems only jewish mothers from Long Island knew about, through their little grapevine.

    I am from Long Island, New York. I recall taking excruciatingly long bus rides to get back to New York City, passing through Scranton, Pennsylvania in the middle of the night.

    Also, I found the place very boring. I don't recall going to any sort of lectures by visiting speakers, as might be the case at a Georgetown University or a Columbia, for example. Perhaps that has changed now.

    Also, I was only there 2 years, because as I said, I transferred in, and graduated early, so it seemed by the time I had settled in, it was time to start planning on leaving, by applying to graduate school, etc. Transferring into a place is hard, because I had started making friends at my previous school, SUNU Albany, and going on dates, and then I had to start all over again, and when I went to a wedding of a SUNY Albany friend a couple years later, I was a complete outsider of the group of friends I used to be part of. After that wedding, I never saw my former friends again. Of course, this was in the days before the internet, so it was much harder to keep up with friends, because there was no email back then, and few people had the money to make long distance phone calls to check in with your former friends.

    So just like the girl who posted this "anti-St Andrews" warning, my negative attitude about Cornell is just one opinion. Others seemed to like it.

    That being said, it is probably the easiest Ivy to get into. Feel free to ask me anything else, but as stated, my opinion is based on facts and impressions from almost forty years ago !!!!! Any professor I might have recommended to you is probably dead by now !!!
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    (Original post by floridadad55)
    kka25:

    You ask about Cornell, and why I hated itl. You must remember that is almost FORTY YEARS ago. My brother's kid is going there now, and he says that on a scale of 1 to 100, he gives it a 95, so he pretty much loves it, and he is a very popular, good looking, city wise kid from Boston. That being said:

    When I went to Cornell, the male female ratio was probably 70-30.

    Cornell is very cold, and is in the middle of nowhere. It is a beautiful campus, but you don't really notice it, or care, in the winter.

    I transferred in, and didn't join a frat, which was a big mistake.

    The friends I made my first year (who were freshman----I was a second semester sophomore) wound up all joining frats, so I was no longer part of their lives, other than perhaps seeing them in class or having lunch with them once in a while, when our paths crossed.

    Also, I didn't have a car.

    Also, I went to the School of Industrial & Labor Relations. It was not a subject I had any real interest in----it was just a way to go to Cornell for 1/2 price, as it is the state university part of Cornell. This was a "secret" way of getting into Cornell that it seems only jewish mothers from Long Island knew about, through their little grapevine.

    I am from Long Island, New York. I recall taking excruciatingly long bus rides to get back to New York City, passing through Scranton, Pennsylvania in the middle of the night.

    Also, I found the place very boring. I don't recall going to any sort of lectures by visiting speakers, as might be the case at a Georgetown University or a Columbia, for example. Perhaps that has changed now.

    Also, I was only there 2 years, because as I said, I transferred in, and graduated early, so it seemed by the time I had settled in, it was time to start planning on leaving, by applying to graduate school, etc. Transferring into a place is hard, because I had started making friends at my previous school, SUNU Albany, and going on dates, and then I had to start all over again, and when I went to a wedding of a SUNY Albany friend a couple years later, I was a complete outsider of the group of friends I used to be part of. After that wedding, I never saw my former friends again. Of course, this was in the days before the internet, so it was much harder to keep up with friends, because there was no email back then, and few people had the money to make long distance phone calls to check in with your former friends.

    So just like the girl who posted this "anti-St Andrews" warning, my negative attitude about Cornell is just one opinion. Others seemed to like it.

    That being said, it is probably the easiest Ivy to get into. Feel free to ask me anything else, but as stated, my opinion is based on facts and impressions from almost forty years ago !!!!! Any professor I might have recommended to you is probably dead by now !!!
    Owh wow. Thanks.

    How was teaching at Cornell? Was it more of a massive lecture theater or class based? Did you have consultation hour and were the lecturers and tutors friendly? Looking back, do you consider prestige as the main factor to go to a Uni as a dad and a former student?
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    (Original post by floridadad55)
    Umi:
    .
    Owh if you want to get the attention of this Umi person, quote or send them a PM. It would get their attention faster
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    (Original post by kka25)
    Owh wow. Thanks.

    How was teaching at Cornell? Was it more of a massive lecture theater or class based? Did you have consultation hour and were the lecturers and tutors friendly? Looking back, do you consider prestige as the main factor to go to a Uni as a dad and a former student?

    At the Industrial & Labor Relations school, it was basically small classes, but this may not be representative of Cornell as a whole, because the ILR school was like being in your own separate little world, with its own library, etc. This was in the day before the internet, so if a professor wanted you to read a 10 page article on a particular subject, you had to go to the ILR library and ask for that article from the librarian. This impeded your ability to study at the other library at the university, which might have resulted in me meeting more people, and more importantly for me back then, more girls. I don't think there was any such thing as consultation however. The professors were pretty good, as I remember. To me, prestige is very important in a school, which is why I transferred to Cornell. Further, the prestige of the school my kid goes to is important to me, and I think should be important to him, because that is a "brand name" "label" you will be wearing for the rest of your life----when you apply to grad school-----when you are interviewing for a job----when you are out on a date-----when you meet the parents of your significant other for the first time.

    It sounds like St Andrews is pretty much perfect for my son, so I almost hope he doesn't get into an Ivy, because I think that St Andrews would be a great place for him, but it would be hard to turn down a Yale, right?

    But ultimately, that will be his decision, not mine, if only because I don't want to force him to go to a school not of his choosing, even if I think it is the best choice, because if he doesn't wind up liking it, I would be blamed for the rest of my life, and even after I am dead.
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    (Original post by floridadad55)
    At the Industrial & Labor Relations school, it was basically small classes, but this may not be representative of Cornell as a whole, because the ILR school was like being in your own separate little world, with its own library, etc. This was in the day before the internet, so if a professor wanted you to read a 10 page article on a particular subject, you had to go to the ILR library and ask for that article from the librarian. This impeded your ability to study at the other library at the university, which might have resulted in me meeting more people, and more importantly for me back then, more girls. I don't think there was any such thing as consultation however. The professors were pretty good, as I remember. To me, prestige is very important in a school, which is why I transferred to Cornell. Further, the prestige of the school my kid goes to is important to me, and I think should be important to him, because that is a "brand name" "label" you will be wearing for the rest of your life----when you apply to grad school-----when you are interviewing for a job----when you are out on a date-----when you meet the parents of your significant other for the first time.

    It sounds like St Andrews is pretty much perfect for my son, so I almost hope he doesn't get into an Ivy, because I think that St Andrews would be a great place for him, but it would be hard to turn down a Yale, right?
    Thanks for the input.

    But ultimately, that will be his decision, not mine, if only because I don't want to force him to go to a school not of his choosing, even if I think it is the best choice, because if he doesn't wind up liking it, I would be blamed for the rest of my life, and even after I am dead.
    You're a great dad

    lol how do you conclude that? My mom did that to me before and to this day, am still resentful of it. I don't really know if it's a good idea for parents tell their kid that they are disappointed with them so
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    (Original post by floridadad55)
    ...
    Regarding St. Andrews, the town. I love it! :love:

    It's rather isolated but if he is into those sort of things like I do, then he would enjoy it I believe. In order to go to St. Andrews from Edinburgh, you would need to take a train and then a bus to reach St. Andrews. The journey from Edinburgh to St. Andrews is lovely. The train would cross over this bridge over looking the sea and the view is stunning! You could see the small houses and cottages along the way. Beautiful.

    So I guess if he's all stressed out with Uni work, he could just take a train, relax, enjoy the view to Edinburgh and have fun in a larger city if he wants to

    Once you reach a station near St. Andrews, he would need to take the bus to St. Andrews. The station is next to a farm! It's beautiful! But not sure how it looks like during Winter or Autumn. Must be gloomy like anywhere I guess :K:

    The buses are quite modern for a small town like St. Andrews. Don't expect talking machine buses like in London or the subways in NYC lol. But it's a nice, decent bus

    Once you reach St. Andrews, you could see how tiny and humble it is

    All the shops are located in one street. So like they say, nothing much there, but it's more then enough for a student. You don't go there to 'hang' in malls aren't you? You're going there to study!

    If you walk a bit further, there's this huge ancient chapel over looking the sea. If he wants to relax or study there, he could. Lovely place to just study and discuss assignments and all.

    St. Andrews Uni is all over the town. Lol, I asked the bus driver where about is St. Andrews Uni and he asked me which part of the Uni I was looking for! The faculties are all over the place so it's not really a campus based Uni. But the town is small. I would imagine there's no need for your son to worry about transportation or going late for classes (I hope).

    Again, it's really a small town. With a single street shops. Very peaceful. Totally not London lol.

    I would suggest you go there with him and look around. Who knows. He might like it.
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    Wow. Reading OP's experience has totally shocked me. I felt like o really wants to go to St Andrews and that's why I put it down as a choice. I'm a very sociable person, I like going out an having a good time eg bars, gigs etc. I don't know anymore...
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    (Original post by ibysaiyan)

    EDIT 2: THIS IS THE MOST NEGGED POST OF MINE,I HATE YOU(THREAD)!!!!!!! <---
    I negged you purely to anger you... Problem?
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    (Original post by Sol1dShot)
    I negged you purely to anger you... Problem?
    Gr/ there goes my 5 gems
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    This thread's still going? :holmes:
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    (Original post by faithxfaye)
    Wow. Reading OP's experience has totally shocked me. I felt like o really wants to go to St Andrews and that's why I put it down as a choice. I'm a very sociable person, I like going out an having a good time eg bars, gigs etc. I don't know anymore...
    Have you read the whole thread?
    I would advise you do, along with other threads in this forum to get both sides of it. Believe me, I like going out and having a good time and I certainly do at St Andrews (just like the majority of students).
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    (Original post by kka25)
    Regarding St. Andrews, the town. I love it! :love:

    It's rather isolated but if he is into those sort of things like I do, then he would enjoy it I believe. In order to go to St. Andrews from Edinburgh, you would need to take a train and then a bus to reach St. Andrews. The journey from Edinburgh to St. Andrews is lovely. The train would cross over this bridge over looking the sea and the view is stunning! You could see the small houses and cottages along the way. Beautiful.

    So I guess if he's all stressed out with Uni work, he could just take a train, relax, enjoy the view to Edinburgh and have fun in a larger city if he wants to

    Once you reach a station near St. Andrews, he would need to take the bus to St. Andrews. The station is next to a farm! It's beautiful! But not sure how it looks like during Winter or Autumn. Must be gloomy like anywhere I guess :K:

    The buses are quite modern for a small town like St. Andrews. Don't expect talking machine buses like in London or the subways in NYC lol. But it's a nice, decent bus
    You don't need to take the bus and train from Leuchars. You can take the x59 bus direct to Edinburgh. takes just over 1hour 30mins and costs just over £10 for a return ticket. Much better way of getting to Edinburgh.
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    (Original post by faithxfaye)
    Wow. Reading OP's experience has totally shocked me. I felt like o really wants to go to St Andrews and that's why I put it down as a choice. I'm a very sociable person, I like going out an having a good time eg bars, gigs etc. I don't know anymore...
    As Ecosse_14 said, please read the rest of the forum and the opinion of other students before you judge St Andrews. There will always be someone who doesn't like a university. I have friends who went to a number of good London unis (UCL, KCL and LSE) who dropped out because they just didn't enjoy the atmosphere. Every uni has drop outs! But there are plenty of students who go to St Andrews every year and who love it. Student satisfaction figures for St Andrews are quite high!

    There are plenty of bars in St Andrews. Someone once told me there were more pubs per square mile in St Andrews than anywhere else in the UK (i'm not sure how true that is) but theres plenty of opportunities to go out. I go out more than some of my friends who go to unis in big cities! There are loads of hosue parties and unique traditions like raisin weekend and the may dip. Personally, I have a very active social life and I love St Andrews. Please read some more of the forum and not just this post!
 
 
 
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