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In Paris, the customer is not always right? watch

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    It's equally bad when sellers refuse to sell things on the basis that you aren't speaking their languages though. Eitherway, the whole idea of one being better than the other is just retarded.
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    F the customer.... i hate you guys.
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    (Original post by L i b)
    Try coming to Scotland. People who work in the service industry here operate on a completely different maxim: "the customer is a ****".
    Ahh so true

    I love it
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    (Original post by Student2806)
    If I work here, then I probably know more about stuff than they do.
    Exactly. This is why bar work is so good, because you can practically tell them to bugger off if they are rude
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    The "Customer Is Always Right" mantra is an awful one, it give a sizable amount of people the idea that any unreasonable requests or demands they make are justified and turning them down is all round bad customer service.

    This was made worse when my meglomaniac managers would side with bad customers against me just to spite me :yikes:
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    I quite like the French system. In Britain, some (not all) people think that just because you’re behind a till you lose all aspects of your humanity and they can treat you poorly. It doesn’t just apply to retail workers either; cleaners are looked down upon as sub-human gremlin-like creatures, who only exist to scrape off that piece of chewing gum you ‘hilariously’ plastered on the window. /rant

    I can imagine how Parisian-style customer service can appear quite daunting for some. The taxi drivers who turned her down because of her leg, that was rather mean.
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    I don't particularly mind the mantra that 'the customer is always right' - it's far funnier arguing with them when they actually believe that.
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    It ultimately stems from the Germanic culture being more considerate, and ultimately more feminine than other cultures, particularly Romance/Southern European cultures. Romance peoples culturally do not care if they piss you off, they view things more releastically. You are no their concern, all they care about ultimately is their family and immediate, select group of friends. Anyone outside this group are regarded as people to be manupulated in order to achieve what they want in life.

    Of course, this doesn't mean they're absolutely rude to everyone they meet, it simply means they won't go out of their way to help someone if there's no benefit in it for them, and often they aren't frightened to say what they think, even at risk of upsetting the other party.

    This attitude is also evident in other areas of life in such countries, such as trying to cross the road, 90% of drivers feel no obligation to stop for a pedestrian, you're on your own there, you've just got to act like a car and force yourself into the road, which then forces them to stop. You might get the occasional kind soul who will stop for you, but I wouldn't count on it.

    Also, it's evident in queing in a lot of countries, in the UK we are socially expected to form ordially ques, and anyone pushing in or violating the que in anyway are delt with, with harsh words, and occasionally violence. An ordially que is taken extremely seriously. However, in ROmance cultures once again you're on your own. No one is gonna keep your place, if you do not assert yourself, someone will push in, the person at the counter doesn't care, it's first come first serve. No one else cares, your on your own and gotta fend for yourself.
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    Even if the customer isn't right, you should at least treat them with respect. As an American, our motto is "the customer is always right, because if we let them think so they'll come back and give us more money." Not the best motive, but at least it means we treat most people the way they should be treated by customer service.

    As for France... ugh. And I don't think the reasoning is because of equality, as the article says. They treat customers like crap. That's not equality.

    I did have some very nice waiters and cab drivers in France, though.
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    Please don't assume the rest of France is like that. Just Paris. kthxbai.
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    (Original post by Anatheme)
    Please don't assume the rest of France is like that. Just Paris. kthxbai.
    I actually thought the Parisians were noticeably nicer and more polite than most others I came across.
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    (Original post by Tombola)
    It's equally bad when sellers refuse to sell things on the basis that you aren't speaking their languages though. Eitherway, the whole idea of one being better than the other is just retarded.
    Is it really difficult to make an effort and try babbling a couple of words in a foreign language when you go on hols? I find it disrespectful not to even try, thanks and hello aren't exactly difficult to learn and they would make the seller happy…
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    (Original post by Delta Usafa)
    I actually thought the Parisians were noticeably nicer and more polite than most others I came across.
    :eyebrow:
    May I ask you where you were?
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    Having said that, I've never found anyone in France a problem, even speaking not a word of French at all. Then again, if someone starts ranting and insulting me in French I have no reservations to begin shouting back and cursing at them in English.
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    (Original post by Anatheme)
    :eyebrow:
    May I ask you where you were?
    Calais, Paris, and a few small places in between. I definitely didn't see enough to say it's a general trend throughout the country, but that's how it went during that specific experience. Most people were at least helpful in Paris, even if they didn't care much. Everywhere else, it was like you were the most irritating thing the people had ever come across, and they did everything they could to avoid giving you useful information or providing a good service.
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    You get that from taxi drivers in a lot of places. Usually because the the government limits supply with licences, and fees with regulations, so it's not worth anyone's while to drive anyone remotely awkward around. Competition is essentially outlawed, so you really have no hold over them.

    Anyway, I don't think that is equality, it is just rudeness. I would not talk that way to a shop employee, or to someone who was paying me to do something, without some kind of provocation.
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    (Original post by Delta Usafa)
    Calais, Paris, and a few small places in between. I definitely didn't see enough to say it's a general trend throughout the country, but that's how it went during that specific experience. Most people were at least helpful in Paris, even if they didn't care much. Everywhere else, it was like you were the most irritating thing the people had ever come across, and they did everything they could to avoid giving you useful information or providing a good service.

    Probz coz u waz American lulz. :iiam:
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    (Original post by Aeolus)
    Probz coz u waz American lulz. :iiam:
    Shouldn't they be double thankful and gracious then? (WW2)
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    (Original post by Anatheme)
    Is it really difficult to make an effort and try babbling a couple of words in a foreign language when you go on hols? I find it disrespectful not to even try, thanks and hello aren't exactly difficult to learn and they would make the seller happy…
    It's utterly pointless to try and speak a language that you don't know at conversation level to purchase things. Yeah, sure it might look impressive when doing so with friends and stuff but otherwise it's just politeness that is not needed.
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    (Original post by UGeNe)
    Shouldn't they be double thankful and gracious then? (WW2)

    The US only entered WWII for the glory. :shh:
 
 
 
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