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In Paris, the customer is not always right? watch

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    I enjoyed the article and think that from the employer side it is good for the customer to be equal because there should not be any differences. In other countries like USA a waiter in a restaurant is seen as a kind of slave who has to do everything he/she can to please you just to get a high tip. However, I don't agree with this I think the French way its better as they see it as a personal pride thing; it's your job so you should try to perform as well as you can regardless of any bonus you may get.

    Also this means workers are more honest and don't just lie like in clothes shop to make you buy a product.

    In general I think the customer is not always right and sometimes there are way too irritating and the profit you make is not as big as the effort you have to put into standing them.

    Just my opinion anyways!!

    Au Revoir!!
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    (Original post by Tombola)
    It's utterly pointless to try and speak a language that you don't know at conversation level to purchase things. Yeah, sure it might look impressive when doing so with friends and stuff but otherwise it's just politeness that is not needed.
    I think it's just being respectful. It's like saying, "I care so little about you I don't even bother speaking the language of the country I'm currently visiting". Whether it be in France or somewhere else, the least one could do would be to know the basic words, like greetings and asking politely something as Anatheme said.

    Anyway, on topic, when I went to London, I was fairly disappointed by the staff who wouldn't answer my hellos or with a tone that expressed very well they felt forced to do it because I said it. I don't think it's France in particular, it just depends on where you go; I'd expect capitals to be usually like this, while people in smaller towns would be nicer. Then again, there are disrespectful people and polite ones, you can't really judge millions people because some of them have been mean.

    It's true though that respect is expected as much from the customer as from the waiter in France, and if you don't show respect they won't show you any either. If you are nice to them, they will be nice to you, and so on. Like any relationship between people.
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    (Original post by Xurvi)
    I think it's just being respectful. It's like saying, "I care so little about you I don't even bother speaking the language of the country I'm currently visiting". Whether it be in France or somewhere else, the least one could do would be to know the basic words, like greetings and asking politely something as Anatheme said.

    Anyway, on topic, when I went to London, I was fairly disappointed by the staff who wouldn't answer my hellos or with a tone that expressed very well they felt forced to do it because I said it. I don't think it's France in particular, it just depends on where you go; I'd expect capitals to be usually like this, while people in smaller towns would be nicer. Then again, there are disrespectful people and polite ones, you can't really judge millions people because some of them have been mean.

    It's true though that respect is expected as much from the customer as from the waiter in France, and if you don't show respect they won't show you any either. If you are nice to them, they will be nice to you, and so on. Like any relationship between people.
    Did they know you were French? I suspect its that French-English hatred thing.
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    (Original post by UGeNe)
    Did they know you were French? I suspect its that French-English hatred thing.
    Maybe, I don't know. It seemed to be to pretty much everyone, not only me.
    I always found that French-English hatred weird, because French who hate the UK are pretty rare (I actually don't know anyone who does), at least where I live. French people working in shops, pubs and the like often complain about how English speaking tourists do not try to speak French and directly speak English; though I have heard other stories about how English speaking people trying to speak French with a smile are very appreciated and often leads to a good customer-waiter relationship.
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    (Original post by UGeNe)
    Shouldn't they be double thankful and gracious then? (WW2)
    That's exactly what I thought! Though it didn't occur to me until after I left France, so I never got a chance to say it to any particularly rude people. :p:

    (Original post by Xurvi)
    It's true though that respect is expected as much from the customer as from the waiter in France, and if you don't show respect they won't show you any either. If you are nice to them, they will be nice to you, and so on. Like any relationship between people.
    What about when you are nice and they're still rude back? That definitely happened quite often.
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    (Original post by Delta Usafa)
    That's exactly what I thought! Though it didn't occur to me until after I left France, so I never got a chance to say it to any particularly rude people. :p:


    What about when you are nice and they're still rude back? That definitely happened quite often.
    I guess they're either rude (whether they had a bad day or are rude by "default") or you've been rude without knowing it. it's fairly likely something acceptable or even common in a country would be seen as disrespect in another. Thumbs up in Iran (or some other middle east country) is considered extremely vulgar and offensive for instance...
    But as I said previously, it depends on where you go. In big cities, people will be stressed out and if you try and take your time, the waiter will be a bit exasperated because they have a lot of work, especially during peak months like summer where France is literally flooded by tourists. In the smallest towns, you may find yourself considered like a "stranger" to the town and the people won't be quite warm. I only assume though, maybe you had very bad luck and you were helped by rude people; but I think it shouldn't make someone think that everybody from a country is rude because of a few bad encounters.

    About the WW2, I don't feel like we owe something to the USA and UK. They were allies, and France would've done the same if it hadn't been owned from the start. Keep in mind that without the French resistance's intelligence and sabotage/guerilla, the Normandy landings would have probably failed. It's teamwork. Otherwise you could say the USA should be thankful for France's help against the British for their own revolution too...
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    (Original post by Xurvi)
    I guess they're either rude (whether they had a bad day or are rude by "default") or you've been rude without knowing it. it's fairly likely something acceptable or even common in a country would be seen as disrespect in another. Thumbs up in Iran (or some other middle east country) is considered extremely vulgar and offensive for instance...
    But as I said previously, it depends on where you go. In big cities, people will be stressed out and if you try and take your time, the waiter will be a bit exasperated because they have a lot of work, especially during peak months like summer where France is literally flooded by tourists. In the smallest towns, you may find yourself considered like a "stranger" to the town and the people won't be quite warm. I only assume though, maybe you had very bad luck and you were helped by rude people; but I think it shouldn't make someone think that everybody from a country is rude because of a few bad encounters.
    Well we weren't in any small towns, and like I said before, in Paris they seemed to be the nicest. And I wouldn't say everyone in the country is rude either (there were some incredibly helpful and friendly people). But the concentration of rude people was really astonishingly higher than anywhere else I'd ever been.

    About the WW2, I don't feel like we owe something to the USA and UK. They were allies, and France would've done the same if it hadn't been owned from the start. Keep in mind that without the French resistance's intelligence and sabotage/guerilla, the Normandy landings would have probably failed. It's teamwork. Otherwise you could say the USA should be thankful for France's help against the British for their own revolution too...
    Doesn't mean you shouldn't be grateful! The world would be a nasty place if it worked on a basis of "we're even, we can treat each other like crap now." And it's not like WWII was the first time the US ever helped France out, either.
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    (Original post by Xurvi)
    I think it's just being respectful. It's like saying, "I care so little about you I don't even bother speaking the language of the country I'm currently visiting". Whether it be in France or somewhere else, the least one could do would be to know the basic words, like greetings and asking politely something as Anatheme said.

    Anyway, on topic, when I went to London, I was fairly disappointed by the staff who wouldn't answer my hellos or with a tone that expressed very well they felt forced to do it because I said it. I don't think it's France in particular, it just depends on where you go; I'd expect capitals to be usually like this, while people in smaller towns would be nicer. Then again, there are disrespectful people and polite ones, you can't really judge millions people because some of them have been mean.

    It's true though that respect is expected as much from the customer as from the waiter in France, and if you don't show respect they won't show you any either. If you are nice to them, they will be nice to you, and so on. Like any relationship between people.
    Guess it's a difference in the perceived weighting of a word. Coming from a stranger, it means very little to me if someone can utter a word or two considering countless of people can give the impression of being 'polite' but hold contradictory thoughts. It seems like unnecessary politeness for the sake of being polite rather than being real. I'd rather see it in their attitude since that is much harder to fake.
 
 
 
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