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    I'm a NY lawyer considering moving to London as an expat. Firms I could potentially interview with are Latham, Linklaters, Weil and White & Case. I'll be doing capital markets work. Which firm should I shoot for? What are the hours like at these firms? Thanks.
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    (Original post by flugestuge)
    Chalks should be able to give you useful advice.
    He is one of the more knowledgeable solicitors on this board ( when he is not surfing in Sydney ). Alternatively, the forum Roll on Friday may be useful.
    Cha-ching. Best swell we've had in 2 months.

    http://www.realsurf.com/2010/02/07/p...y-sunday-arvo/

    No useful advice available at this time. Please call again later.
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    It's fabulous today. Swell is still pushing through, wind has turned offshore, size has dropped off so that the Point is holding.

    Sorry, am I boring you all?

    Move to Oz guys...this is what we do before we go to work

    http://saltmotion.com/
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    Just got back from central London. Train was 20minutes late, nearly froze to death waiting for it in an icy wind, and it started snowing. I can see the attraction of moving to Oz...
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    Hi

    I do not know a great deal about these US firms, except that they are VERY coveted firms to work for in London, i would say rivalling the Magic Circile firms.

    Weil in London is known as THE place for private equity and restructuring/insolvency, so you may want to bear that in mind. The head of recruitment there is Jillian Singh, and she is very approachable and welcoming to email enquiries; her email can be founf on the Weil website.

    Are you a qualified UK solicitor as well as NY? Im sure you know already, but if you are not UK qualified, you can take the Qualified Lawayers Transfer test, which will allow you to become Uk qualified. Info can be found from the SRA website.

    I hope this is in some way constructive.
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    Thanks, very helpful. From your response, it seems like Linklaters would be the place to go since I won't be doing pe or restructuring. Also, I'm not a qualified UK solicitor and am not sure I will need to be one to be an expat. No one's raised the point to me in any of my interviews but I wouldn't have any issues beoming one. Would you happen to know the cost of living adjustment for expats at any of the firms I mentioned (or for the London market in general)? Thanks.
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    (Original post by the dooder)
    Thanks, very helpful. From your response, it seems like Linklaters would be the place to go since I won't be doing pe or restructuring. Also, I'm not a qualified UK solicitor and am not sure I will need to be one to be an expat. No one's raised the point to me in any of my interviews but I wouldn't have any issues beoming one. Would you happen to know the cost of living adjustment for expats at any of the firms I mentioned (or for the London market in general)? Thanks.
    What do you mean by cost of living adjustment? You won't be paid more because you're from overseas.
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    Well, he might be paid relocation expenses.

    The cost of living in London is high. But you should manage just fine on a salary from Linklaters. Mind you, rental property costs are, apparently, rising.
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    (Original post by chalks)
    What do you mean by cost of living adjustment? You won't be paid more because you're from overseas.
    I'm not 100% sure they are still paid in the current climate but, as I understand it, in the past some of the US firms have paid their US associates who work in their London offices a "cost of living" allowance.

    The discussion in the comments here tend back this up;

    http://abovethelaw.com/2007/09/vault_top_50_uk.php
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    (Original post by Juneau)
    I'm not 100% sure they are still paid in the current climate but, as I understand it, in the past some of the US firms have paid their US associates who work in their London offices a "cost of living" allowance.

    The discussion in the comments here tend back this up;

    http://abovethelaw.com/2007/09/vault_top_50_uk.php
    Where you transfer with your firm, that may well happen. However, in this case where the OP is simply looking for a role with a UK firm and will be leaving his existing US firm then I can't imagine there would be any cost of living adjustment.
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    (Original post by the dooder)
    I'm a NY lawyer considering moving to London as an expat. Firms I could potentially interview with are Latham, Linklaters, Weil and White & Case. I'll be doing capital markets work. Which firm should I shoot for? What are the hours like at these firms? Thanks.
    Why can you only interview with those firms? There are plenty of others who do capital markets work.

    Hours? As demanding as in the US.
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    Those are the firms recruiters may be able to set me up with for interviews. If I go to one of these firms, I would be going as a US lawyer working in London, so I would be compensated as if I were working in such firm's NY office. Expats also get a COLA bump since living in London is more expensive than NY. This amount varies from firm to firm.
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    Your looking for info in the wrong place. There are no practicing solicitors on this forum except chalks. People on here are generally undergrad students. Surely the HR departments at the relevant organisations will be able to answer these questions?
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    Thanks, FMQ. I'm sure they could but I hear the COLA can be negotiated so I wanted to go in with some knowledge of what's market to make sure I'm not being ripped off and to make sure I'm not making unreasonable demands. Is there a forum that practicing UK attorneys frequent? And thanks to everyone for the input given so far.
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    (Original post by the dooder)
    Is there a forum that practicing UK attorneys frequent?
    Roll on Friday.
    But it is pretty crap.
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    Ha, thanks, flugestuge, didn't realize that was the name of the forum you mentioned before. I thought were you saying to come back and ask the forum on Friday.
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    (Original post by the dooder)
    Ha, thanks, flugestuge, didn't realize that was the name of the forum you mentioned before. I thought were you saying to come back and ask the forum on Friday.
    More specifically, this board on Roll On Friday is probably the one to post on: http://www.rollonfriday.com/Communit...8/Default.aspx
    It has discussions of Training Contracts and so should be full of solicitors in "finding a job" mode.
    I should warn you that it is even more juvenile than TSR, hard though that is to imagine.
 
 
 
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