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    Firstly I have a daughter in primary and we are applying for a secondary school place. The school we really have on our hearts is an IB school and they exclusively do IB at A level and get top results.

    I do have worries about IB, first I have heard its extremely hard and she needs to works her socks off. My question is will it not put her in a disadvantage later is life if she gets OKish grades when applying to unis whereas with A levels she might have got better grades

    I know some of my worries are a bit far fetched, at the moment we dont know what she will do it could be arts or sciences. All I can say now is she loves maths. My concern is that if she decides to persue sciences like medicine and engineering, will IB not out her in disadvantage than counterparts doing Maths, Physics and Chemistry which seem to go a bit deeper to my little undertanding.

    The reason I a really keen on IB is that it is very diverse and its very portable. We are an expat family here and have lived her for 10years and so far there are no plans of moving in the forseable future but the tingling feeling is it could happen one day. But to be honest I really dont want to base my opinion on this alone but on the whole of IB as an alternative to A level...Also the most schools that do IB seem a bit more diverse in their intake of student but then again it could just be wrong. Diversity would really be an added bonus for us.

    I would really appreciate any feedback and any issues I need to be aware of regarding IB
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    does the school do gcse or ib middle years.

    if it does ib middle years you might want to think about it carefully, but at aged 11 there are an impossible number of factors to consider (including what she wants) that won't become apparent until she is aged 16 when the decision needs to be made.

    ib middle years is like gcses with no tangible qualification attatched, so if the school only offers that then i would look elsewhere, otherwise chill!
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    (Original post by sherry_d)
    Firstly I have a daughter in primary and we are applying for a secondary school place. The school we really have on our hearts is an IB school and they exclusively do IB at A level and get top results.

    I do have worries about IB, first I have heard its extremely hard and she needs to works her socks off. My question is will it not put her in a disadvantage later is life if she gets OKish grades when applying to unis whereas with A levels she might have got better grades

    I know some of my worries are a bit far fetched, at the moment we dont know what she will do it could be arts or sciences. All I can say now is she loves maths. My concern is that if she decides to persue sciences like medicine and engineering, will IB not out her in disadvantage than counterparts doing Maths, Physics and Chemistry which seem to go a bit deeper to my little undertanding.

    The reason I a really keen on IB is that it is very diverse and its very portable. We are an expat family here and have lived her for 10years and so far there are no plans of moving in the forseable future but the tingling feeling is it could happen one day. But to be honest I really dont want to base my opinion on this alone but on the whole of IB as an alternative to A level...Also the most schools that do IB seem a bit more diverse in their intake of student but then again it could just be wrong. Diversity would really be an added bonus for us.

    I would really appreciate any feedback and any issues I need to be aware of regarding IB

    NO worries"D
    She is going to enter secondary right? FOr MYP ? I am doing it right now, if your daughter is awesome at math, she WILL do great! Moreover there are still many years before she needs to make her decision which is when she is in year.11 (the year of personal project due x_X). also if she is bad at any subject at the moment, she will definitely improve on those area of she is keen on them. Teachers in IB schools are very passionate and always love to help improve their student to be the best. IB is great! It's hard, but if she work hard she might actually find it easy, (not saying me but..yeh), acceptable and adaptable. She will learn a lot of skills throughout MYP such as critical, writing and observation skills.

    Overall IB will give her a great advantage in her later on life.
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    I do the IB Dipolma and in my 2nd year (exams in May).

    I regret doing it... there is no significant advantage.. with hindsight I should have studied the conventional A levels.

    You study considerably harder.. you have to study at 100% for 2 years.

    A Levels modules make A levels easier to pass.. a levels are like gcse's.. all exams at the end.. one bad exam day.. one bad grade.

    Do A levels.. get your A's/A*s and get into a good uni

    I want study medicine.. how does french or english help me?

    It doesn't.. but my offer at uni depends on d grade i get....
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    Yes it ill put her at a disadvantage, there's no benefit to studying history and languages and other bs if you have made up your mind about the field you want to do such as a maths/engineering type. She'd be better off doing A levels at a different school, I'd be inclined to say it'd look better if she got top A Level results at an OKish school than average IB results at a top school.
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    I'm going to say this however, you're assuming your daughter will WANT top stay on at that school for post-16 studies, I myself changed schools as others offered a-levels i prefered, why not base the school choice on what is best for your daughter in full-time education, up to GCSE, and let her make the decision later on?
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    Thank you, it seems there is no clear cut answer to my question. The school does GCSE and IGCSE at O level and it does seem to have emphasis on languages too. here is the bit in their prospectus.

    Year 10 students follow a compulsory core of subjects to GCSE which consists of Maths, English Language, English Literature, a modern foreign language and Science. Students study all three sciences and are awarded three IGCSEs at the end of the course. All pupils are also expected to study a humanity (History or Geography or Classical Civilisation) and most take one of the creative subjects as well. Optional subjects are History, Geography, Classical Civilisation, Drama, Music, Art, Design (Resistant Materials), Design (Systems
    & Control) Information Technology, Latin, Classical Greek, and another
    modern foreign language i.e. French, German, Spanish or Russian. All students follow the school’s own International Studies course in Years 10 and 11. I/GCSE courses run for two years and are examined at the end of Year 11.
    As you can see the school does in deed follow a curriculum in preparation for IB at A level and thus my worry that if my daughter turns out to love sciences then she may be at a disadvantage as the school really does prepare for the IB from the way I see it. We do love everything else about the school and even the IB. The school is very hard to get in so it may just end up being wishful thinking too is she doesnt get a place.

    I think we have to base our decision on what we feel is right for her now and then see how she gets on and what she will be interested in doing later for her A level. I am still convienced IB is the way to go but just wanted a little more information.
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    I am going to be horribly contrary and say that the IB(DP) isn't actually that hard. Sure, you have six subjects, but that's a lot better than MYP's thirteen or whatever it was (and a comparable number if you're doing GCSEs, if I understand correctly?). I can see why people dislike the programme, but in truth I think it's worth it - mostly because of its breadth.

    As for workload: I didn't do any serious work until halfway through year 2 of the diploma programme and I am doing just fine.
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    (Original post by Futurdoc)
    I want study medicine.. how does french or english help me?
    You should enjoy the fact that the IB gives you a wide range of subjects that broaden your horizons even if you feel like they're completely useless. One day you'll go on holidays to Tahiti, with all the money you earned from being a doc, and will be happy to remember French. Plus you'll be less of an idiot being able to discuss Chaucer or whoever you're studying at the moment when you will have met the love of your life, who happened to have studied English at uni :holmes:. Or something like that.

    It's tough, but you get so much more respect for doing the IB, and you definitely end up with more knowledge than A-Levels students doing only Maths, Chemistry and Biology.
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    My 2 cents about the IB:

    Yes, it is probably harder than A-levels and the lack of resits is a bit of a shame. It's easy to compensate for that by taking 4 higher-levels, since offers usually only specify 3HLs and an overall score. Getting the overall score is never an issue due to the bonus points and easy SL subjects, but meeting the HL requirements is. This approach is quite a bit of extra work, but it paid off for me. Arguably, the same can be done by taking extra A-levels.

    As for the useless subjects - I beg to differ. I did a literature based HL course (my native lang) and philosophy SL and they were both quite helpful in developing critical thinking and the ability to write coherent essays, which are both essential skills. Someone complained about the foreign language - can't say much about that since English B was a really simple for me, but it's the same as essays, it's useful to know more languages and it's unlikely you'll get time to do them at uni.

    Looking back I'm quite glad I did the IB, but if your main goal is to get in to a good uni then A-levels may be a safer choice.
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    This sounds like Sevenoaks to me. If she can get in, she will love it! Also, if you do end up travelling then you will have the boarding option.

    The IB is very hard work but it is fantastic preparation for university. If she is a science geek, then a school familiar with the IB will steer her towards the right subjects. Studying English and another language will never harm her, just make her a more rounded person.
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    I think for once, that I actually agree with Subcut. Choose what's best until year 11, and then she can choose what she'd like to do after that. She might not want to go on and do academic subjects, she may decide she'd like to do a more vocational course at an FE college.

    Also, I used to ADORE maths at about her age. Then I totally changed my mind, scraped a C at GCSE, and did three essay based A levels.
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    (Original post by Anatheme)
    You should enjoy the fact that the IB gives you a wide range of subjects that broaden your horizons even if you feel like they're completely useless. One day you'll go on holidays to Tahiti, with all the money you earned from being a doc, and will be happy to remember French. Plus you'll be less of an idiot being able to discuss Chaucer or whoever you're studying at the moment when you will have met the love of your life, who happened to have studied English at uni :holmes:. Or something like that.

    It's tough, but you get so much more respect for doing the IB, and you definitely end up with more knowledge than A-Levels students doing only Maths, Chemistry and Biology.
    I understand your argument and do agree that I've become a more rounded person.

    However, despite what I was told before I opted to study the IB, universities do not look favourably on IB students - in terms of getting into uni (which is my main focus) there's no advantage.

    If some1 is a natural academic, then they'll love the IB. They love TOK, CAS - the variety of subjects. If your main focus, is to get into the best university possible... Do A levels which you like & are good at.

    For most competitive unis, they consider AAA to equate to 38 Points. Surely, it must be easier to gain 3 As than 38 points? Surely..
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    Speaking as a current IB student, I am torn between saying 'NOOOOOOO! You will lose your daughter to suicide halfway through IB', and saying 'I'm sure it'll be the best long term option'.

    IB is a lot of work and needs proper commitment - if her motivation drops during the course there is very little chance that it will pick up again, and that could spell disaster. I think that it's more well-respected than the A-Level system, seeing as how it doesn't have modular exams. However if your daughter is only in primary school, there is plenty of time for her to change her mind.

    Presumably if she does her GCSEs and decides she doesn't want to do IB, she would be able to move to a different sixth form college and do A-Levels?

    One thing I would say is that I chose the IB by myself, and I know that if my parents had forced me into it, I would really really hate them right now.
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    (Original post by Subcutaneous)
    I'm going to say this however, you're assuming your daughter will WANT top stay on at that school for post-16 studies, I myself changed schools as others offered a-levels i prefered, why not base the school choice on what is best for your daughter in full-time education, up to GCSE, and let her make the decision later on?
    This :ditto: many students choose to change schools, or follow other paths after secondary school, the best decision now is to find out where your daughter will be happiest at secondary school, if she's a primary still she's going to be 11 at the oldest, a lot's going to change before she's 16 :yep:

    Although in terms of the IB itself I wish I'd had the opportunity to do it myself, my school has just started offering it this year now that I've left :rolleyes: it's very much down to the individual though, the IB is much more co-ordinated for those who want a varied education, whereas A-levels I found worked on a very distinct subject by subject basis, you have no way of knowing what your daughter will prefer at this time :dontknow:
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    (Original post by Futurdoc)
    universities do not look favourably on IB students - in terms of getting into uni (which is my main focus) there's no advantage.

    If some1 is a natural academic, then they'll love the IB. They love TOK, CAS - the variety of subjects. If your main focus, is to get into the best university possible... Do A levels which you like & are good at.

    For most competitive unis, they consider AAA to equate to 38 Points. Surely, it must be easier to gain 3 As than 38 points? Surely..
    I agree with you that some universities are less informed about the IB that others, however most universities are now realising that the IB is a more rigorous course than A-Levels, and are adjusting their entry requirements accordingly.

    For example, I applied to Durham thinking that I would have to get 39 points with a 7 in HL History, however I got an offer for 37 points and a 6 in HL History. York, a uni which asks 3 As, offered me 36 points and a 6 in HL History. If you apply to the right universities, IB should give you an advantage rather than a disadvantage.
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    (Original post by Anatheme)
    You should enjoy the fact that the IB gives you a wide range of subjects that broaden your horizons even if you feel like they're completely useless. One day you'll go on holidays to Tahiti, with all the money you earned from being a doc, and will be happy to remember French. Plus you'll be less of an idiot being able to discuss Chaucer or whoever you're studying at the moment when you will have met the love of your life, who happened to have studied English at uni :holmes:. Or something like that.

    It's tough, but you get so much more respect for doing the IB, and you definitely end up with more knowledge than A-Levels students doing only Maths, Chemistry and Biology.
    That, or you could study more than 3 A levels if you really wanted to broaden your horizons... that's what I did.
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    (Original post by xSkyFire)
    That, or you could study more than 3 A levels if you really wanted to broaden your horizons... that's what I did.
    Good for you.
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    (Original post by sherry_d)
    Firstly I have a daughter in primary and we are applying for a secondary school place. The school we really have on our hearts is an IB school and they exclusively do IB at A level and get top results.

    I do have worries about IB, first I have heard its extremely hard and she needs to works her socks off. My question is will it not put her in a disadvantage later is life if she gets OKish grades when applying to unis whereas with A levels she might have got better grades

    I know some of my worries are a bit far fetched, at the moment we dont know what she will do it could be arts or sciences. All I can say now is she loves maths. My concern is that if she decides to persue sciences like medicine and engineering, will IB not out her in disadvantage than counterparts doing Maths, Physics and Chemistry which seem to go a bit deeper to my little undertanding.

    The reason I a really keen on IB is that it is very diverse and its very portable. We are an expat family here and have lived her for 10years and so far there are no plans of moving in the forseable future but the tingling feeling is it could happen one day. But to be honest I really dont want to base my opinion on this alone but on the whole of IB as an alternative to A level...Also the most schools that do IB seem a bit more diverse in their intake of student but then again it could just be wrong. Diversity would really be an added bonus for us.

    I would really appreciate any feedback and any issues I need to be aware of regarding IB
    ALRIGHT LISTEN
    here's the short and true answer

    if she's a good student (not that lazy, hardworking, mildly intelligent)

    and you put her into a decent school (good IB coordinator and teachers)

    then she will do FINE.

    honestly, it's hard work but if she's a good student she will do well in either IB or A-levels.
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    Thank again, I am beginning to understand now why the school really only take in intelligent kids at 11+ because then chances are they wont struggle much with the IB when the time comes.

    I am confident with this school as its one of the best IB schools but just hadnt quite made our minds completely on the IB and so you people here have been awesome in telling me more about this diploma.

    The main hurdle for us if for her to pass the entrance examination for the school. They only take the cream and I am doing the best to help my daughter to pass these and just for her to get a bit more discipline in her work so hoping when she starts secondary it will not be too much of a shock to her and she ever decided to do IB then well hooo that requires even much more discipline.

    Out of interest why did you decide on doing IB if it require much more hard work and yet from this post I gather there really isnt much in terms of preferances by universities. Surely A levels seem a bit more appealing in this case esp if you plan on going to top universities, much less work for higher grades???
 
 
 

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