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    (Original post by sherry_d)
    Thank again, I am beginning to understand now why the school really only take in intelligent kids at 11+ because then chances are they wont struggle much with the IB when the time comes.

    I am confident with this school as its one of the best IB schools but just hadnt quite made our minds completely on the IB and so you people here have been awesome in telling me more about this diploma.

    The main hurdle for us if for her to pass the entrance examination for the school. They only take the cream and I am doing the best to help my daughter to pass these and just for her to get a bit more discipline in her work so hoping when she starts secondary it will not be too much of a shock to her and she ever decided to do IB then well hooo that requires even much more discipline.

    Out of interest why did you decide on doing IB if it require much more hard work and yet from this post I gather there really isnt much in terms of preferances by universities. Surely A levels seem a bit more appealing in this case esp if you plan on going to top universities, much less work for higher grades???
    Unless I am much mistaken, the school to which you refer is Sevenoaks.
    The school has a very good track record with regards to the IB.
    If taught well then students will succeed regardless of whether they study A-level, IB or Pre_U.
    Furthermore, given that the Sevenoaks approach is to study a fairly regular programme up to the age of 16, she could always switch before her post 16 studies begin.
    I re-iterate, if the school is Sevenoaks, then it really is a very good school indeed.
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    You seem to be saying you shouldn't take IB because it's 'more work' than A levels?

    My experience of the IB is that I can (more than A levels) study what interests me. I have chosen my own essay titles in the course (musical investigation, extended essay, english essays, historical investigation) and although I'm doing slightly more work than A levels, it's work that I'm interested in and therefore more fulfilling and dare I say it 'easier' as a result. I get the impression that doing independent learning and research on a topic puts you in good stead for university-style learning.

    So I feel working harder now with the IB prepares me better for university, and the gap between uni and IB is smaller than that of uni and A-levels.

    P.S.
    (Original post by bemusedcapybara)
    ALRIGHT LISTEN
    here's the short and true answer

    if she's a good student (not that lazy, hardworking, mildly intelligent)

    and you put her into a decent school (good IB coordinator and teachers)

    then she will do FINE.

    honestly, it's hard work but if she's a good student she will do well in either IB or A-levels.
    Hit the nail on the head.
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    She's only 11, leave her alone for God's sake!
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    (Original post by sherry_d)
    Thank again, I am beginning to understand now why the school really only take in intelligent kids at 11+ because then chances are they wont struggle much with the IB when the time comes.

    I am confident with this school as its one of the best IB schools but just hadnt quite made our minds completely on the IB and so you people here have been awesome in telling me more about this diploma.

    The main hurdle for us if for her to pass the entrance examination for the school. They only take the cream and I am doing the best to help my daughter to pass these and just for her to get a bit more discipline in her work so hoping when she starts secondary it will not be too much of a shock to her and she ever decided to do IB then well hooo that requires even much more discipline.

    Out of interest why did you decide on doing IB if it require much more hard work and yet from this post I gather there really isnt much in terms of preferances by universities. Surely A levels seem a bit more appealing in this case esp if you plan on going to top universities, much less work for higher grades???
    Well as mentioned previously it's a matter of personal preference :yep: a lot is down to how someone learns best and what subjects they want to take. Whilst difficulty and preference from universities is important, getting the right type of course for your chosen subject combination and learning style when given the choice is also (possibly more of) an important factor.
    The IB focuses more on a balance, requiring students to take a mixture of courses including a language (for example), whereas A levels put different focus on subjects, with less interaction between them.
    A levels are better if; for example you know you only want to do Maths, Further Maths and Physics.
    IB would've been better for someone like myself who wanted to do a variety...mixing Arts, Humanities and Science at A level wasn't the easiest :giggle:
    But that's not something that's going to have to be decided for a long time, and your daughter'll probably know in 5 years time what she wants to do in that respect...if she wants to go to this secondary school all good, but of course she won't necessarily end up doing IB at the end of the day
    Hope all goes well for your daughter
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    (Original post by sherry_d)
    Out of interest why did you decide on doing IB if it require much more hard work and yet from this post I gather there really isnt much in terms of preferances by universities. Surely A levels seem a bit more appealing in this case esp if you plan on going to top universities, much less work for higher grades???
    well, it might be a bit more "work", but i feel like im a much better educated and more rounded person for it. had i done a levels id have gone down the maths and science route, now im doing english, latin, french and philosophy as well as maths, physics and chemistry (im doing an extra 7th subject) and although i have a tok presentation tomorrow and an english one the day after as well as 2 essays in this week on top of other homework and CAS, im really enjoying it, and i don't regret it at all.

    if your daughter is academic, intelligent and inspired by a variety of subjects, then the IB is for her, but ultimately it's her decision when she's in Year 11.
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    (Original post by Bubbles*de*Milo)
    She's only 11, leave her alone for God's sake!
    Right now I have to choose a school for her and need to understand a bit more about the curriculum of the school since the school is very heavy on IB. I am not trying to get her to do IB, infact I wouldnt have posted here if I thought so but wanted to know more from those doing it.

    The school is Sevenoaks yes but we just didnt want to go for it with tainted glasses but fully aware about the ethos and curriclulum of the school.
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    (Original post by sherry_d)
    Out of interest why did you decide on doing IB if it require much more hard work and yet from this post I gather there really isnt much in terms of preferances by universities. Surely A levels seem a bit more appealing in this case esp if you plan on going to top universities, much less work for higher grades???
    I took the IB because I couldn't narrow it down to just three subjects that I wanted to take at A-Level. Also, I had no idea of what I wanted to do at university or after that, so I figured I would leave my options open. Finally, it seemed like a more respected and challenging course than A-Levels.

    Secondly, I don't agree with your point about A-Levels making it easier to get into good universities. If I'd done A-Levels, I would have been predicted three As, maybe an A* in one of them. I would never have stood out enough to apply for Cambridge or Durham, there are thousands of applicants with three As. However, with a prediction of 41 in IB, I stood out enough to get an interview and get into the pool. I also got an offer from Durham.

    Although it might be easier to get good grades at A-Level, it doesn't make it easier to get into top universities. Someone who gets three As could get anywhere from between 36-45 IB points, meaning that IB gives universities a more precise indicator of a student's abilities, and makes them more likely to spot the top candidates.
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    (Original post by Bubbles*de*Milo)
    She's only 11, leave her alone for God's sake!
    Milo no! :eek:

    It is very important to get your child into a decent school, and it appears to me that Sevenoaks has a great reputation. The IB is respected and accepted all over the world, so she will have great employability no matter where she is. If she likes maths, then that can only be a good thing. =)

    I remember when I used to adore maths in primary school; I'm now going to do Further Maths A-level next year.

    Your daughter will have plenty of time to decide and eventually discover whether to take arts/science subjects. With the IB's broad curriculum she'll be exposed to both anyway.
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    (Original post by loonyplatypus)
    I took the IB because I couldn't narrow it down to just three subjects that I wanted to take at A-Level. Also, I had no idea of what I wanted to do at university or after that, so I figured I would leave my options open. Finally, it seemed like a more respected and challenging course than A-Levels.

    Secondly, I don't agree with your point about A-Levels making it easier to get into good universities. If I'd done A-Levels, I would have been predicted three As, maybe an A* in one of them. I would never have stood out enough to apply for Cambridge or Durham, there are thousands of applicants with three As. However, with a prediction of 41 in IB, I stood out enough to get an interview and get into the pool. I also got an offer from Durham.

    Although it might be easier to get good grades at A-Level, it doesn't make it easier to get into top universities. Someone who gets three As could get anywhere from between 36-45 IB points, meaning that IB gives universities a more precise indicator of a student's abilities, and makes them more likely to spot the top candidates.
    Thanks for your post, its clarified some of the issues I had in my head. I think we will just continue to persue this school for her.

    You really are smart if you have a 41 prediction.
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    There is an advantage at doing IB, you have something more than the average A level student! For now she can do the MYP and then, later on, if she struggles, she could change i guess?!

    What's good with the IB is that you really get to improve as a person and doing a range of subjects IS A GOOD THING, even if it's damn hard =P
    No, but actually if you study you can totally manage it; I mean, i've always been good at school and sure G13 is tough, but totally manageable and still got a 44/45 predicted grades
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    (Original post by loonyplatypus)
    However, with a prediction of 41 in IB, I stood out enough to get an interview and get into the pool.
    I find that point dubious. I went to a small IB school (class size of 20) and almost everyone that applied to the UK was predicted above 40+, however, it did not appear to give them a considerable advantage. Anyway, claims like these are not verifiable.

    Personally, I always felt my score of 40 was a disadvantage compared to AAA, since if those A are borderline As by UMS it isn't visible, whereas it's clear that my score just barely clears the requirements.
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    (Original post by mathew551)
    Milo no! :eek:

    It is very important to get your child into a decent school, and it appears to me that Sevenoaks has a great reputation. The IB is respected and accepted all over the world, so she will have great employability no matter where she is. If she likes maths, then that can only be a good thing. =)

    I remember when I used to adore maths in primary school; I'm now going to do Further Maths A-level next year.

    Your daughter will have plenty of time to decide and eventually discover whether to take arts/science subjects. With the IB's broad curriculum she'll be exposed to both anyway.
    Good school yes, but a school where they're happy is even more important! Plus i don't think ANY normal parent would consider their childs a-level future when picking a secondary school, it's the sort of thing the child picks for themselves, a good school with good GCSE and KS3+4 curriculums is all you need. IB may be respected, but it may not be what the kid wants in 5-6 years time! I don't think many people on tsr can say they like the same subjects they studies at primary school..i used to LOVE history, and loathed it at GCSE, I hated science at primary school and am now doing a Bsc.. and have science a-levels! IB won't make much difference to the child whilst in secondary education.
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    lol sevenoaks.

    if you get her into the school, she'll probs end up at a good uni. guarantee. or she'll be kicked out before exams.
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    (Original post by sherry_d)
    The school is Sevenoaks yes but we just didnt want to go for it with tainted glasses but fully aware about the ethos and curriclulum of the school.
    Both the ethos and curriculum are sound. Due to the very competitive nature of entry a lot of students will start to prepare for the interview + examinations way in advance, If I am not mistaken you will be considering 2011 entry, in which case you have plenty of time to prepare for the examinations.

    With regards to the IB/ A-level issue, if you do decide to apply to SO, then you will have another 5 years to think about this ...
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    Honestly? I don't think you can really tell what she's going to be like academically at such a young age.

    I passed my 11+ with full marks, was bright at school despite being awful at maths (very creative arts based, me!). I went to a local grammar which I really, really wanted to go to - and for the first three years, I loved it. However after yr 9 with the onset of GCSEs the tone of the school changed dramatically and it was where my peers who coped well with stress, pressure and rigorous routine triumphed and those - like me - who found it all too much and crumbled under the expectations. Whatever school she goes to will be tough come exam time, but if you worry too much about it now then it'll be even tougher for you both when exam time comes around as you'll be expecting fantastic amazing results off of her and she'll be under pressure to achieve them. If you take a more relaxed approach to her schooling, you'll both be better off.
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    (Original post by Subcutaneous)
    Plus i don't think ANY normal parent would consider their childs a-level future when picking a secondary school.
    Erm, you are joking, right?
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    (Original post by sherry_d)
    Firstly I have a daughter in primary and we are applying for a secondary school place. The school we really have on our hearts is an IB school and they exclusively do IB at A level and get top results.

    I do have worries about IB, first I have heard its extremely hard and she needs to works her socks off. My question is will it not put her in a disadvantage later is life if she gets OKish grades when applying to unis whereas with A levels she might have got better grades

    I know some of my worries are a bit far fetched, at the moment we dont know what she will do it could be arts or sciences. All I can say now is she loves maths. My concern is that if she decides to persue sciences like medicine and engineering, will IB not out her in disadvantage than counterparts doing Maths, Physics and Chemistry which seem to go a bit deeper to my little undertanding.

    The reason I a really keen on IB is that it is very diverse and its very portable. We are an expat family here and have lived her for 10years and so far there are no plans of moving in the forseable future but the tingling feeling is it could happen one day. But to be honest I really dont want to base my opinion on this alone but on the whole of IB as an alternative to A level...Also the most schools that do IB seem a bit more diverse in their intake of student but then again it could just be wrong. Diversity would really be an added bonus for us.

    I would really appreciate any feedback and any issues I need to be aware of regarding IB
    btw-- the IB diploma is your daughter's last two years of schooling.

    from here until that point, just make sure she gets a bright education that will allow her to expand her horizons and broaden her mind and all that jizzlejazzle.

    come back to this forum in about 4 years and THEN you'll get information that's useful for you.
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    (Original post by Mrm.)
    Erm, you are joking, right?

    Nope, my mum would have liked me to have gone to uni and always pushed me to do the best I can, but did she check out the sixth form when it was my secondary school open day back in 2000...er no. She did however attend college open days when i was considering Btec's with me, and discuss a-level subjects i was considering (health and social care at onepoint :facepalm:) but not once when discussing my post-16 education did she think what she wanted for me, but focused on what i wanted to do- this was my decision, my education now and my responsibilty, not hers.
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    (Original post by sherry_d)
    Firstly I have a daughter in primary and we are applying for a secondary school place. The school we really have on our hearts is an IB school and they exclusively do IB at A level and get top results.

    I do have worries about IB, first I have heard its extremely hard and she needs to works her socks off. My question is will it not put her in a disadvantage later is life if she gets OKish grades when applying to unis whereas with A levels she might have got better grades

    I know some of my worries are a bit far fetched, at the moment we dont know what she will do it could be arts or sciences. All I can say now is she loves maths. My concern is that if she decides to persue sciences like medicine and engineering, will IB not out her in disadvantage than counterparts doing Maths, Physics and Chemistry which seem to go a bit deeper to my little undertanding.

    The reason I a really keen on IB is that it is very diverse and its very portable. We are an expat family here and have lived her for 10years and so far there are no plans of moving in the forseable future but the tingling feeling is it could happen one day. But to be honest I really dont want to base my opinion on this alone but on the whole of IB as an alternative to A level...Also the most schools that do IB seem a bit more diverse in their intake of student but then again it could just be wrong. Diversity would really be an added bonus for us.

    I would really appreciate any feedback and any issues I need to be aware of regarding IB
    My thoughts on it are if she does well enough to get a decent place in whatever course she wishes to follow (and she [B]will/B] need to do well) then the IB will put her at an advantage by preparing her more effectively for university and later life. If however she doesn't go all the way and she doesn't end up achieving the place in uni she would have obtained through A-levels then it will be something to regret as the IB will have put her at a disadvantage by being a much more difficult qualification for which universities still don't give a fair amount credit.
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    (Original post by Subcutaneous)
    Nope, my mum would have liked me to have gone to uni and always pushed me to do the best I can, but did she check out the sixth form when it was my secondary school open day back in 2000...er no. She did however attend college open days when i was considering Btec's with me, and discuss a-level subjects i was considering (health and social care at onepoint :facepalm:) but not once when discussing my post-16 education did she think what she wanted for me, but focused on what i wanted to do- this was my decision, my education now and my responsibilty, not hers.
    Obviously a child at 16 can decide on schools quite independently, however, at 11 you just don't have the same kind of perspective. If you got a bad school at 11 your choice later in life may be more limited.
 
 
 
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