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IB For My Daughter-will it be OK? watch

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    (Original post by Anamaria90)
    I kind of agree with you there. I remember looking around schools aged 10/11 and picking which ones I like based on the fact that they had a pet rabbit or that they sold doughnuts with sprinkles on in the canteen :p:
    You sound like my daughter
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    (Original post by Subcutaneous)
    Nope, my mum would have liked me to have gone to uni and always pushed me to do the best I can, but did she check out the sixth form when it was my secondary school open day back in 2000...er no. She did however attend college open days when i was considering Btec's with me, and discuss a-level subjects i was considering (health and social care at onepoint :facepalm:) but not once when discussing my post-16 education did she think what she wanted for me, but focused on what i wanted to do- this was my decision, my education now and my responsibilty, not hers.
    What you write above has really no relevance to your previous point. Here you are writing about your own, individual experience, previously you said:

    (Original post by Subcutaneous)
    i don't think ANY normal parent would consider their childs a-level future when picking a secondary school
    Now if you seriously believe this then I can tell you that you are Naive at best.
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    (Original post by Mrm.)
    What you write above has really no relevance to your previous point. Here you are writing about your own, individual experience, previously you said:



    Now if you seriously believe this then I can tell you that you are Naive at best.

    I doubt i'm nieve..i have a lot of friends whose children are starting or have started yr 7, and not one mentioned the good bits about the school based on the sixth form
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    (Original post by Subcutaneous)
    I doubt i'm nieve..i have a lot of friends whose children are starting or have started yr 7, and not one mentioned the good bits about the school based on the sixth form
    With regards to being naive, I don't doubt it for one second.
    What you and your friends may or may not discuss in no way constitutes what a "Normal" parent is.
    I know for a fact, that many, many savvy parents look at external examination results, especially at A-level, before choosing the school. As for whether or not this is more prevalent in the private sector, I know not, although this is the area which I am accustomed to.
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    (Original post by Mrm.)
    With regards to being naive, I don't doubt it for one second.
    What you and your friends may or may not discuss in no way constitutes what a "Normal" parent is.
    I know for a fact, that many, many savvy parents look at external examination results, especially at A-level, before choosing the school. As for whether or not this is more prevalent in the private sector, I know not, although this is the area which I am accustomed to.

    At the grand age of what i can assume must be under 18, and must have much experience of the average parent, educational considerations...you're probably having a little fantasy that mummy and daddy went and checked out the sixth form results, and buildings adn facilities, and very much considered it to be the factorising part in their decision

    when the matter of it is, most parents look at GCSE's, maybe note whether there is/isn't a sixth form, and look at how the school can support the transition, my mums and parent support worker in a major comprehensive in bristol and they don't even discuss a-level results, or the sixth form at yr7 open days, apart from the fact there IS one
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    (Original post by Subcutaneous)
    At the grand age of what i can assume must be under 18, and must have much experience of the average parent, educational considerations...you're probably having a little fantasy that mummy and daddy went and checked out the sixth form results, and buildings adn facilities, and very much considered it to be the factorising part in their decision

    Erm No, I am more than just a little over the age of 18 and am the Head of Maths and Computer Science in a top flight selective school. In that role I have also run countless open evening for prospective parents from the many feeder schools in the area (and yes, they have a keen interest in A-level results)..... Sorry, what was your experience in this field again? ah yes, you have a few friends that ....etc.....

    (Original post by Subcutaneous)
    , most parents look at GCSE's, maybe note whether there is/isn't a sixth form, and look at how the school can support the transition, my mums and parent support worker in a major comprehensive in bristol and they don't even discuss a-level results, or the sixth form at yr7 open days, apart from the fact there IS one

    You really have no idea what most parents look at, do you ........

    Nonetheless I still find your original comment about "Normal parents" both irksome, childish and quite frankly insulting.
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    (Original post by The IC Guy)
    Let her go wherever she wants. At 11/12 you're old enough to understand the differences between schools. My parents let me choose my secondary school and I'm glad that they did.
    Same here - I made the best choice - and was extremely happy where I went.
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    (Original post by Mrm.)
    Erm No, I am more than just a little over the age of 18 and am the Head of Maths and Computer Science in a top flight selective school. In that role I have also run countless open evening for prospective parents from the many feeder schools in the area (and yes, they have a keen interest in A-level results)..... Sorry, what was your experience in this field again? ah yes, you have a few friends that ....etc.....




    You really have no idea what most parents look at, do you ........

    Nonetheless I still find your original comment about "Normal parents" both irksome, childish and quite frankly insulting.

    I very much doubt this is true as you seem to have the social skills, and social awareness for that matter of a rather stuck up teenage boy, who would probably cry if someone told him maths isn't real...Maybe take yourself down to the average comprehensive, or an inner city school and go and experience the real world for a bit, and what the parents there think- something called 'opening eyes' and 'being realistic'
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    omg, she's 11! forget all that.
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    (Original post by Srije)
    you can do 3-4 A levels in maths alone with the A level system. And please look at the OCR mei syllabus which blows IB out of the water.
    Feel free to correct me on any of this, but in practice people generally take Mathematics and Further Mathematics. I've looked at a few comparisons between IB and A-levels (caveat: I only have firsthand experience with the IB), and they seem to agree that the IB HL course covers everything the A-level Maths course does (again, excluding mechanics, which is covered by IB Physics), plus some of the Further Maths material. The IB Further Mathematics course more than makes up for what HL Maths skips or glosses over.

    And I did briefly look at the Mei syllabus. I agree, it's more demanding than HL Maths, but from what I know of IB Further Maths, it's about the same level.
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    (Original post by Srije)
    Same here - I made the best choice - and was extremely happy where I went.
    Grats on the LSE offer man

    Anyway I went to an academic holocaust of a secondary school in East London where the pass rate was < 30% lol..
    My GCSEs were fairly muffed up as a result however I now go to a private college and I have to admit it's a once in a life time experience having gone to a poor state school, it really built my character and in doing so I found friends for life

    You get some good with the bad atleast :p:
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    (Original post by Subcutaneous)
    I very much doubt this is true as you seem to have the social skills, and social awareness for that matter of a rather stuck up teenage boy, who would probably cry if someone told him maths isn't real...Maybe take yourself down to the average comprehensive, or an inner city school and go and experience the real world for a bit, and what the parents there think- something called 'opening eyes' and 'being realistic'
    You seem to analyze this with a massive chip on your shoulder. I don't know why that is, but it's hard to take anyone seriously who is on a vendetta against the independent sector.
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    (Original post by Subcutaneous)
    I very much doubt this is true as you seem to have the social skills, and social awareness for that matter of a rather stuck up teenage boy, who would probably cry if someone told him maths isn't real...Maybe take yourself down to the average comprehensive, or an inner city school and go and experience the real world for a bit, and what the parents there think- something called 'opening eyes' and 'being realistic'
    Oh it's true alright. I really have no reason to lie. As for my social skills, well they are quite intact. It is interesting to note that your whole argument has taken a rather different direction.... But this isn't about me, I have no need nor desire to visit an inner city school, i am fully versed with regards to educational issues of many such schools. I also happen to think that perhaps you would find some benefit from opening your eyes just a little......
    Time for sleep.goodnight.
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    (Original post by sherry_d)
    Firstly I have a daughter in primary and we are applying for a secondary school place. The school we really have on our hearts is an IB school and they exclusively do IB at A level and get top results.
    Sorry, haven't read all the thread but saw a few of the first posts. If for MYP I would probably personally try going for GCSEs instead but if we're having an A-level vs IB debate then my thoughts are not the same. I'll try explaining below.

    I do have worries about IB, first I have heard its extremely hard and she needs to works her socks off. My question is will it not put her in a disadvantage later is life if she gets OKish grades when applying to unis whereas with A levels she might have got better grades
    IB is hard, that's true. Does it mean 24hr studying? Answer is obviously no... With a good head, some study skills and determination you don't really need to put in excessive amounts of time (sure 2-6hrs a day out of lessons depending on time of the year could be expected).
    Yes, it will put an applicant at a disadvantage getting 34 IB points if they could have got AAA at A-level (sorry using old system, I'm at uni now and still not used to A* grades!). However, if they're likely to get in the 36/38-45 region (and as such likely satisfy entrance requirements at most top 10/20 unis for the relevant subject) I'd say it's rather an advantage; IB is more of a challenge and much more like what university work is like - it is a better preparation, but it is not easier to get in, or get good grades.

    I know some of my worries are a bit far fetched, at the moment we dont know what she will do it could be arts or sciences. All I can say now is she loves maths. My concern is that if she decides to persue sciences like medicine and engineering, will IB not out her in disadvantage than counterparts doing Maths, Physics and Chemistry which seem to go a bit deeper to my little undertanding.
    If she likes maths, clearly IB HL Maths is what she should be doing - it tends to be required at most top universities for any science degree (sometimes not Medicine or Biology, but certainly Engineering, Maths, Physics and most Economics). In addition to this she will take one subject from natural sciences (normally Biology/Chemistry/Physics, there are a few more but most schools don't offer them) and as a 6th subject another natural science can be chosen.
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    (Original post by Subcutaneous)
    I very much doubt this is true as you seem to have the social skills, and social awareness for that matter of a rather stuck up teenage boy, who would probably cry if someone told him maths isn't real...Maybe take yourself down to the average comprehensive, or an inner city school and go and experience the real world for a bit, and what the parents there think- something called 'opening eyes' and 'being realistic'
    I agree with her as far as East London goes, this is because there's an incredibly large working class Asian population that generally don't have a clue about how the British education system works... That and private school tuition just isn't afforable for the majority
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    (Original post by opaltiger)
    Feel free to correct me on any of this, but in practice people generally take Mathematics and Further Mathematics. I've looked at a few comparisons between IB and A-levels (caveat: I only have firsthand experience with the IB), and they seem to agree that the IB HL course covers everything the A-level Maths course does (again, excluding mechanics, which is covered by IB Physics), plus some of the Further Maths material. The IB Further Mathematics course more than makes up for what HL Maths skips or glosses over.

    And I did briefly look at the Mei syllabus. I agree, it's more demanding than HL Maths, but from what I know of IB Further Maths, it's about the same level.
    Comment on this (from having done IB HL Maths, and been doing STEP etc. which has forced me to look a lot into the A-level syllabus and talk to people).

    I consider IB HL Maths to be similar to FM A-level, the latter covers slightly more content but the exam questions and syllabus content is not really any harder than similar IB questions. The IB is harder to get a good grade in because of the examination form, I reckon, and I think it prepares you very well, especially with the option which is usually never covered at A-level (or not more than partially) in any module.

    IB Further Mathematics includes all options (and Euclidean geometry), which I think, as above, is much closer to university maths, and it is significantly more challenging than most A-level stuff (sure there are some hard things in e.g. M4-M5). I don't think IB FM is anything like A-level FM, or for that matter AFM (Additional Further Maths i.e. 18 modules).
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    (Original post by Futurdoc)
    For most competitive unis, they consider AAA to equate to 38 Points. Surely, it must be easier to gain 3 As than 38 points? Surely..
    Sure; I'd go as far as arguing even scores of 30-ish can be 3 A's, more or less. Say 667 at HL and 345 with 0 or 1 bonus point will add up to 31-32, and this person would seemingly have got AAA at A-level. However scores such as this are unusual as people tend to be quite good overall when choosing IB.
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    (Original post by sherry_d)
    ...
    I've read the whole thread and just wanted to pick you up on something that has been glossed over, which is that IB sciences in no way under-prepare you for university in comparison to their A levels counterparts.

    It is true that there are differences in content where sometimes A levels will go more in depth. However IB has those moments too, especially with the HL options. In addition it is generally agreed that the examining is more rigorous for the IB with only 3 papers taken at the end of the course. Overall though, there is very little difference between the two - no more really I'd say than the difference between two different exam boards for A levels.

    Of course, the syllabi are changed every 5 or so years so things may be very different by the time your daughter comes around to deciding if she will pursue the diploma. University requirements and the general perceived disadvantage of doing the IB might be completely different as well (although I doubt it). What's more important for you right now is obviously getting into a good school and GCSEs. I've heard great things about Sevenoaks. Good luck to your daughter.
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    (Original post by opaltiger)
    Feel free to correct me on any of this, but in practice people generally take Mathematics and Further Mathematics. I've looked at a few comparisons between IB and A-levels (caveat: I only have firsthand experience with the IB), and they seem to agree that the IB HL course covers everything the A-level Maths course does (again, excluding mechanics, which is covered by IB Physics), plus some of the Further Maths material. The IB Further Mathematics course more than makes up for what HL Maths skips or glosses over.

    And I did briefly look at the Mei syllabus. I agree, it's more demanding than HL Maths, but from what I know of IB Further Maths, it's about the same level.
    There are 21 modules (which means 3.5 A levels in Maths alone in the mei syllabus). IB HL maths and Further maths SL cover maybe 10-12 modules of the MEI course - the modules FP3, S4,NM,NC,DC parts of D2, all the mechanics (M3-M4 may go past anything in IB physics), DE are not seen in the IB FM topics.

    Unlike most boards - doing IB maths HL alone cannot compete with a FM A level from MEI - There are many inferior boards teaching A level further maths which Maths IB HL certainly competes with and goes beyond.

    I would say that doing HL maths IB and FM SL is on par with MEI's Maths and Further Maths A level.

    But then when you go past this stage - far more maths is available to you with the MEI system, and is customisable to your needs.

    Edit:
    (Original post by xSkyFire)
    Grats on the LSE offer man

    Anyway I went to an academic holocaust of a secondary school in East London where the pass rate was < 30% lol..
    My GCSEs were fairly muffed up as a result however I now go to a private college and I have to admit it's a once in a life time experience having gone to a poor state school, it really built my character and in doing so I found friends for life

    You get some good with the bad atleast :p:
    Cheers man , going to a state school definitely helps build character.
 
 
 
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