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    (Original post by Srije)
    DE are not seen in the IB FM topics.
    I would say that doing HL maths IB and FM SL is on par with MEI's Maths and Further Maths A level.
    Wrong. It's topic 4 of the options. This thread isn't meant to be for comparing maths exams so I'll keep it brief: 97,000 students took the IB last may, 115 took FM SL, only 12 received the top mark of a 7. (Source).NB every IB student must take maths at some sort of level.

    I've never heard anyone claim that another maths qualification surpasses FM SL before. Perhaps it does in content :confused: but difficulty?... No. You don't have a copy of a syllabus or something I can have a peek at do you? Here is one for FM SL if you want a better idea of what you are talking about.
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    (Original post by Iapetus)
    Wrong. It's topic 4 of the options. This thread isn't meant to be for comparing maths exams so I'll keep it brief: 97,000 students took the IB last may, 115 took FM SL, only 12 received the top mark of a 7. (Source).NB every IB student must take maths at some sort of level.

    I've never heard anyone claim that another maths qualification surpasses FM SL before. Perhaps it does in content :confused: but difficulty?... No. You don't have a copy of a syllabus or something I can have a peek at do you? Here is one for FM SL if you want a better idea of what you are talking about.
    I think the DE module may go further than the DE option in FM SL? I might be wrong. Here is the MEI spec.
    http://www.ocr.org.uk/download/kd/oc...l_gce_spec.pdf

    Why can it not surpass in difficulty? It's hard to compare because UMS scores and a 7 aren't easily comparable.
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    (Original post by Srije)
    Why can it not surpass in difficulty? It's hard to compare because UMS scores and a 7 aren't easily comparable.
    Retakes for one thing, the modular format another but above all just by basing it on the stats I provided. UMS points are turned into grades boundaries A*-E or U just as raw marks for the IB exams are turned into grade boundaries 7-1. Comparing grades directly can work (A*=7, A=6 etc), and works better because raw scores are not publicly available for both qualifications. Granted that this is grossly unfair because percentage boundaries for grades are not the same, it's still overwhelmingly obvious that a smaller proportion of people get higher grades in FM SL what with all the yabber about grade inflation in A levels (unless this one is an exception).

    I suppose a better indicator of difficulty would be to directly compare exam questions for the same topics but even then you'd run into complications like the familiarity of the question style being more suited for one of us than the other. Ideally I'd propose a statistical test: select an unbiased sample of A level mathematicians to take a FM SL paper and vice versa, then compare relative scores. IRL that wouldn't be a fair test either due to only 100 ish people taking FM SL each year, as well as modular exams not holistically testing ones mathematical ability.
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    (Original post by danny111)
    english would help you not to spell "the" as "d" and hence make your application for medicine stronger.

    ps stop whining, if you cant do IB how the **** could you do medicine? there are very few people who say uni is harder than IB (from my school) and all those saying uni is harder are doing medicine (with a few exceptions of ppl that do techincal courses like maths/physics). lazy git.
    'The' & 'D' - You've never heard of text typing?
    First and foremost, I can do the IB.. that's never been the problem.
    My argument is that there's no benefit in doing soo much more work than someone doing A Levels for the same result - a place at a good university. People will be lying if they claimed that take up the option of doing less work for the same outcome if the opportunity arisen.

    Secondly, I will be able to handle the workload at medical school. It's not difficult to stay on top of work from one subject - a subject which you're interested in.

    If got excited over some trivial TOK Essay, that's your business. I'm just stating the facts for the OP.

    Facts: In the IB, you will do considerably more work than your A Level for no forseen benefit.
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    (Original post by Iapetus)
    Retakes for one thing, the modular format another but above all just by basing it on the stats I provided. UMS points are turned into grades boundaries A*-E or U just as raw marks for the IB exams are turned into grade boundaries 7-1. Comparing grades directly can work (A*=7, A=6 etc), and works better because raw scores are not publicly available for both qualifications. Granted that this is grossly unfair because percentage boundaries for grades are not the same, it's still overwhelmingly obvious that a smaller proportion of people get higher grades in FM SL what with all the yabber about grade inflation in A levels (unless this one is an exception).

    I suppose a better indicator of difficulty would be to directly compare exam questions for the same topics but even then you'd run into complications like the familiarity of the question style being more suited for one of us than the other. Ideally I'd propose a statistical test: select an unbiased sample of A level mathematicians to take a FM SL paper and vice versa, then compare relative scores. IRL that wouldn't be a fair test either due to only 100 ish people taking FM SL each year, as well as modular exams not holistically testing ones mathematical ability.
    Firstly - the stats you provided are nothing in themselves - its like me saying "only 12 candidates out of xxxxx got 90%" - it does not mean anything at all. I agree that just taking grades into account, it is easier doing an A level since you only need 80 ums/100 to get an A- but universities will take into account ums scores... getting 9x% will look more favourable... what we do not know is what a 7 corresponds to in terms of an average % ums on the A level system. e.g. is a 7 = a candidate who achieved 550/600 in his A level?

    Oh by the way - e.g. for the module S4 - you can count the number of people who took it nationally on your hands - these exams are also very selective in the raw sense, but as before it does not mean anything in itself.

    A better way to guage it is to see how successful further mathematicians from both systems are at the STEP 2 &3 examination for Cambridge - that should give a better idea but still there are many biases which could be involved.
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    (Original post by Futurdoc)
    'The' & 'D' - You've never heard of text typing?
    First and foremost, I can do the IB.. that's never been the problem.
    My argument is that there's no benefit in doing soo much more work than someone doing A Levels for the same result - a place at a good university. People will be lying if they claimed that take up the option of doing less work for the same outcome if the opportunity arisen.

    Secondly, I will be able to handle the workload at medical school. It's not difficult to stay on top of work from one subject - a subject which you're interested in.

    If got excited over some trivial TOK Essay, that's your business. I'm just stating the facts for the OP.

    Facts: In the IB, you will do considerably more work than your A Level for no forseen benefit.
    quite sad that you see no benefit in broadening your education - beyond the joke that is GCSEs.

    In most other countries they find it pathetic if you do not take your mother tongue past intermediate level (GCSE for you) or that you do not bother to attempt to learn a foreign language. In fact in Germany, universities do not accept people that took A levels. But I guess you know better, right?
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    (Original post by danny111)
    quite sad that you see no benefit in broadening your education - beyond the joke that is GCSEs.

    In most other countries they find it pathetic if you do not take your mother tongue past intermediate level (GCSE for you) or that you do not bother to attempt to learn a foreign language. In fact in Germany, universities do not accept people that took A levels. But I guess you know better, right?
    1st: A Levels do broaden one's education. You're implying that only the IB broadens one's education which is evidently incorrect.

    2nd: We're not in OTHER countries. We're in the UK, I will go to a UK medical school and shall practice in a UK hospital.

    To be clear I did learn French @ GCSE. Nevertheless, why would it be necessary to learn a foreign language when English is becoming more and more universal?

    It seems to be me that you've enjoyed your IB experience and fair play to you. But you must acknowledge that you've done more work than required for the same outcome.
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    (Original post by Futurdoc)
    1st: A Levels do broaden one's education. You're implying that only the IB broadens one's education which is evidently incorrect.

    2nd: We're not in OTHER countries. We're in the UK, I will go to a UK medical school and shall practice in a UK hospital.

    To be clear I did learn French @ GCSE. Nevertheless, why would it be necessary to learn a foreign language when English is becoming more and more universal?

    It seems to be me that you've enjoyed your IB experience and fair play to you. But you must acknowledge that you've done more work than required for the same outcome.
    You have 3 or 4 A levels, or how many you did. I have the IB Diploma. Hardly the same outcome. Now they are similar of course, but there is a difference.

    And the standard answer by a UK citizen. Pathetic, particularly coming from someone who aims to become one of the academic/social elite (which doctors are).

    Yes, we are in England. I was just highlighting the fact that England is by no means the standard one should aspire to.
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    (Original post by Futurdoc)
    1st: A Levels do broaden one's education. You're implying that only the IB broadens one's education which is evidently incorrect.

    2nd: We're not in OTHER countries. We're in the UK, I will go to a UK medical school and shall practice in a UK hospital.

    To be clear I did learn French @ GCSE. Nevertheless, why would it be necessary to learn a foreign language when English is becoming more and more universal?

    It seems to be me that you've enjoyed your IB experience and fair play to you. But you must acknowledge that you've done more work than required for the same outcome.
    I agree to be honest, I learnt French at GCSE and French at A level would be completely pointless because I want to be a doctor in the UK. IF you want to learn french there's nothing stopping you from doing more than 4 A levels....

    The Pakistani guy who now studies at Cambridge did something ridiculous like 26 A levels which is definitely a "broad education".
    However he did get a ton of As including As in Maths, Further Maths, Physics.. But he only got a C for additional further maths which should give an indicator of how difficult it is to get a good grade in it.
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    "09-02-2010 21:18 load of ********. talk some ******* sense you ****. " - whoever negged rep me - why don't you argue a proper point instead of just swearing - it makes you look quite stupid.
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    (Original post by Srije)
    "09-02-2010 21:18 load of ********. talk some ******* sense you ****. " - whoever negged rep me - why don't you argue a proper point instead of just swearing - it makes you look quite stupid.
    lol, welcome to TSR. I have come to accept this, hence my nice display of rubys.
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    (Original post by danny111)
    You have 3 or 4 A levels, or how many you did. I have the IB Diploma. Hardly the same outcome. Now they are similar of course, but there is a difference.

    And the standard answer by a UK citizen. Pathetic, particularly coming from someone who aims to become one of the academic/social elite (which doctors are).

    Yes, we are in England. I was just highlighting the fact that England is by no means the standard one should aspire to.
    Loool I'm doing the IB Dipolma... My argument all alone has been that A Levels is much the easier and wiser option.

    To be honest, I don't mind learning French. But its something I'd rather not be graded on, it's scandalous that my grade in French has a bearing on my potential place in medical school.

    Clearly we have differing views on education. You see it as an opportunity to broaden your horizons etc. Whereas, I believe you shall make it as easy as possible for yourself, do the least work for the same outcome.
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    (Original post by Futurdoc)
    I do the IB Dipolma and in my 2nd year (exams in May).

    I regret doing it... there is no significant advantage.. with hindsight I should have studied the conventional A levels.

    You study considerably harder.. you have to study at 100% for 2 years.

    A Levels modules make A levels easier to pass.. a levels are like gcse's.. all exams at the end.. one bad exam day.. one bad grade.

    Do A levels.. get your A's/A*s and get into a good uni

    I want study medicine.. how does french or english help me?

    It doesn't.. but my offer at uni depends on d grade i get....
    I would have to agree with this guy. Here I am in the second year wondering what inspired me to do this course... its harder, theres tonnes of work and there is always something you havent done yet. If she is going to a UK uni there is no advantage..
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    (Original post by danny111)
    lol, welcome to TSR. I have come to accept this, hence my nice display of rubys.
    Haha - what annoys me is not the rep (who cares about e-rep in the first place?) but the fact that some people just haven't learned to communicate or debate and instead just make personal attacks. Thankfully a lot of people on here aren't like that... :rolleyes:
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    (Original post by Futurdoc)
    Loool I'm doing the IB Dipolma... My argument all alone has been that A Levels is much the easier and wiser option.

    To be honest, I don't mind learning French. But its something I'd rather not be graded on, it's scandalous that my grade in French has a bearing on my potential place in medical school.

    Clearly we have differing views on education. You see it as an opportunity to broaden your horizons etc. Whereas, I believe you shall make it as easy as possible for yourself, do the least work for the same outcome.
    I pray that you will never be my doctor.
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    (Original post by sherry_d)
    Firstly I have a daughter in primary and we are applying for a secondary school place. The school we really have on our hearts is an IB school and they exclusively do IB at A level and get top results.

    I do have worries about IB, first I have heard its extremely hard and she needs to works her socks off. My question is will it not put her in a disadvantage later is life if she gets OKish grades when applying to unis whereas with A levels she might have got better grades

    I know some of my worries are a bit far fetched, at the moment we dont know what she will do it could be arts or sciences. All I can say now is she loves maths. My concern is that if she decides to persue sciences like medicine and engineering, will IB not out her in disadvantage than counterparts doing Maths, Physics and Chemistry which seem to go a bit deeper to my little undertanding.

    The reason I a really keen on IB is that it is very diverse and its very portable. We are an expat family here and have lived her for 10years and so far there are no plans of moving in the forseable future but the tingling feeling is it could happen one day. But to be honest I really dont want to base my opinion on this alone but on the whole of IB as an alternative to A level...Also the most schools that do IB seem a bit more diverse in their intake of student but then again it could just be wrong. Diversity would really be an added bonus for us.

    I would really appreciate any feedback and any issues I need to be aware of regarding IB
    I finished the IB in May 2009 with 42 points, and to be honest it's not as difficult as some people make out. Yes, it's hard and has a lot of work, but if your daughter's fairly intelligent and motivated (which she should be if she's aiming for good IB/A-level grades anyway) she should do well.

    IB is also in no way a disadvantage for application to top universities and/or subjects - I've got an offer from Cambridge for Medicine, and the only other Oxbridge applicant (an IB student) from my school also got an offer for English. The fact that the structure of the IB didn't allow me to take three sciences wasn't an issue at all. With regards to syllabus content, A level is generally equivalent to a Higher Level in the same subject, but in terms of Maths the IB Standard Level content is about the same as A level Maths; HL is more like A level Further Maths.

    Reading your subsequent posts, if I were you I would try for the IB school. Even if she decides she doesn't want to take IB, she can always move schools after I/GCSEs, which prepare you for both IB/A levels - even if the school's GCSE curriculum is geared towards the IB, the fact that most people take eight or more GCSEs means that she'd probably be taking a wide range of subjects even if she were at a different school.
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    (Original post by schnargle)
    I finished the IB in May 2009 with 42 points, and to be honest it's not as difficult as some people make out. Yes, it's hard and has a lot of work, but if your daughter's fairly intelligent and motivated (which she should be if she's aiming for good IB/A-level grades anyway) she should do well.
    very nice, 42 is for winners. shows your clever but not a total geek.
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    (Original post by schnargle)

    IB is also in no way a disadvantage for application to top universities and/or subjects - I've got an offer from Cambridge for Medicine, and the only other Oxbridge applicant (an IB student) from my school also got an offer for English.
    thank you for sharing. Not that my kid will be a doctor or go to oxbridge but this puts my mind at rest that you can do sciences at uni with IB

    You are indeed clever 42 points yey

    I know i have been told she will choose her A level, sure she will but I am more at rest that the school's curriculum and ethos really suits what we want for DD. It was just the science aspect bothering me a bit. who knows she may even be into arts and launguages but its good to know the curriculum will not disadvantage her choices either way
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    (Original post by Br0wn Bear)
    Excuse me young man but why are you sucking the ib off it is the ******** programme in the world. If i ever see you on the street I will slap you into last week so u can bang ur tok essay again
    I did not know one can suck off an organisation. Maybe I should have done A levels to learn this fact.

    And i wanna see you try that.
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    (Original post by danny111)
    I pray that you will never be my doctor.
    I wasn't going to dignify that with a response; however, I love winning arguments :p: .

    So you would not like a doctor to help you who is at the apporiate standard ?

    Once again, you've fail to acknowledge my argument.

    To graduate from medical school, one has to attain the very high GMC standards.

    If, and I will repeat if, I can attain these standards without working very hard, then what is the problem?

    Why would I stress myself, overwork myself, If i need not ?

    Please - answer this for me...
 
 
 
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