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    (Original post by Futurdoc)
    I wasn't going to dignify that with a response; however, I love winning arguments :p: .

    So you would not like a doctor to help you who is at the apporiate standard ?

    Once again, you've fail to acknowledge my argument.

    To graduate from medical school, one has to attain the very high GMC standards.

    If, and I will repeat if, I can attain these standards without working very hard, then what is the problem?

    Why would I stress myself, overwork myself, If i need not ?

    Please - answer this for me...
    so you admit you would be stressed if you had to do the IB?

    Either way, I stand by what I said. I would not want to have you as my doctor - someone who just does the bare minimum is in my opinion not worthy of being a doctor.
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    (Original post by danny111)
    so you admit you would be stressed if you had to do the IB?

    Either way, I stand by what I said. I would not want to have you as my doctor - someone who just does the bare minimum is in my opinion not worthy of being a doctor.
    For the uptenth time - i do the IB!

    Your responses are laughable, they do not make any sense.

    By the way, your opinion is way of the mark. Spend your life unneccessarily overworking yourself - see how long you last.
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    (Original post by Futurdoc)
    For the uptenth time - i do the IB!

    Your responses are laughable, they do not make any sense.

    By the way, your opinion is way of the mark. Spend your life unneccessarily overworking yourself - see how long you last.
    so you are overworking yourself doing the IB?
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    (Original post by danny111)
    so you are overworking yourself doing the IB?
    By doing the IB - I'm doing more work than is required.

    7 Subjects (Yes, including TOK) as opposed to 3 or 4 A Levels.

    More stress, more pressure, more sleepless nights.

    The only benefit is that the exams finish in May - but how much of a benefit is this considering all the major disadvantages ?
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    (Original post by Futurdoc)
    By doing the IB - I'm doing more work than is required.

    7 Subjects (Yes, including TOK) as opposed to 3 or 4 A Levels.

    More stress, more pressure, more sleepless nights.

    The only benefit is that the exams finish in May - but how much of a benefit is this considering all the major disadvantages ?
    Again my point about you being stressed from the IB. What do you expect medical school let alone night shifts to be like?

    Are you going to do as little as possible in life? I would not want a doctor like that, and since I dont think we will agree that is all I will say.
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    I think Futurdoc has the high ground here.
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    (Original post by danny111)
    Again my point about you being stressed from the IB. What do you expect medical school let alone night shifts to be like?

    Are you going to do as little as possible in life? I would not want a doctor like that, and since I dont think we will agree that is all I will say.
    I think you misunderstood what he meant, doing more work than required and overworking are very different. Here's a good example ;
    You walk a path and for every mile you walk relative to the path you'll raise £10. You walk in a straight line for a mile and raise £10, someone else walks around the path for 2 miles but only raise £10 because they reached the same destination, just took a more difficult route.

    Then someone else decides to put in more work but they walk along the straight line path for 2 miles and raise more than both of the previous people (£20).

    However I admit I'm slightly overworked with 5 A levels but again that was out of choice because I don't really gain any advantage as far as getting into university goes compared to someone with say... 4 A levels lol :p:
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    (Original post by xSkyFire)
    I think you misunderstood what he meant, doing more work than required and overworking are very different. Here's a good example ;
    You walk a path and for every mile you walk relative to the path you'll raise £10. You walk in a straight line for a mile and raise £10, someone else walks around the path for 2 miles but only raise £10 because they reached the same destination, just took a more difficult route.

    Then someone else decides to put in more work but they walk along the straight line path for 2 miles and raise more than both of the previous people (£20).

    However I admit I'm slightly overworked with 5 A levels but again that was out of choice because I don't really gain any advantage as far as getting into university goes compared to someone with say... 4 A levels lol :p:
    exactly. and my point is that either

    a) he is doing simply more work than "required" which i agree you could do a levels and do less - but if you are that lazy then you should not be a doctor (imo very important to note) as well as my opinion that a broader education is more useful (and no GCSE is not education).

    or

    b) he is overworking in IB already in which case he shud not do med school.

    and since obviously disagree with my opinions stated in a) I said i would leave the discussion with him.
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    (Original post by danny111)
    exactly. and my point is that either

    a) he is doing simply more work than "required" which i agree you could do a levels and do less - but if you are that lazy then you should not be a doctor (imo very important to note) as well as my opinion that a broader education is more useful (and no GCSE is not education).

    or

    b) he is overworking in IB already in which case he shud not do med school.

    and since obviously disagree with my opinions stated in a) I said i would leave the discussion with him.
    point B I agree with but for point A although you reach the same destination with less academic work, I have time for paid employment to help fund uni and get in work experience/volunteering across the year and even pick up a few grades on violin which is still beneficial. Of course it's impossible to become a doctor without meeting the GMC criteria which has very high expectations so either way even someone who didn't put in 100% during their college years will learn it's no joke somewhere along the 5/6 years of med school. In that scenario they won't even become a doctor without putting in the ridiculous amount of work required :p:
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    (Original post by danny111)
    Again my point about you being stressed from the IB. What do you expect medical school let alone night shifts to be like?

    Are you going to do as little as possible in life? I would not want a doctor like that, and since I dont think we will agree that is all I will say.
    Once again, I will say that I have NO problem with working hard. For most people, we have to work hard to get somewhere. Medicine is very tough, emotionally..mentally and physically draining and I am prepared for this. Know that.

    As I've said, IB is much more work than A Levels - but it is the same outcome - a place at university. My argument has been all along that if one could work less, but achieve the same outcome as someone who works hard -then what is the problem. Who wouldn't ? Seriously...

    Medical school is tough. However, if (and unlikely) I find it easier than some other students. Take it easy.. don't revise as much as other students.. But I gain the same high GMC standards, then what is problem?

    I fail to see your argument and I know I'm not being ignorant.

    Btw, IB is difficult.. but iits not killing me .
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    Nothing worth doing is really easy.
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    (Original post by leehoma)
    Nothing worth doing is really easy.
    I beg to differ... Sleeping is VERY EASY.. what's more it is an necessity.. and thus is very much worth doing :p:
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    (Original post by Srije)
    There are 21 modules (which means 3.5 A levels in Maths alone in the mei syllabus). IB HL maths and Further maths SL cover maybe 10-12 modules of the MEI course - the modules FP3, S4,NM,NC,DC parts of D2, all the mechanics (M3-M4 may go past anything in IB physics), DE are not seen in the IB FM topics.

    Unlike most boards - doing IB maths HL alone cannot compete with a FM A level from MEI - There are many inferior boards teaching A level further maths which Maths IB HL certainly competes with and goes beyond.

    I would say that doing HL maths IB and FM SL is on par with MEI's Maths and Further Maths A level.

    But then when you go past this stage - far more maths is available to you with the MEI system, and is customisable to your needs.
    I recommend you to re-read my post above. I do have first hand experience to some extent with both systems (have been helping A-level students, and have looked at the syllabi closely before studying for STEP) and some things you say above are just wrong - such as the lack of DE's. Separable DE's are in core in HL maths and other first order DE's are part of the "Series and Differential Equations" option. We don't do 2nd order, which is a difference in syllabus but there are several things not included in A-level (or not at all boards).

    The one point I would agree with you is that IB HL Maths probably covers in the range 9-12 modules of A-level maths in terms of content, but then I would argue that the examination form, skills required to do the hardest questions etc. make up for the marginal lack of content meaning they're in the end not too different as indicators of mathematical knowledge/skill.
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    (Original post by nota bene)
    I recommend you to re-read my post above. I do have first hand experience to some extent with both systems (have been helping A-level students, and have looked at the syllabi closely before studying for STEP) and some things you say above are just wrong - such as the lack of DE's. Separable DE's are in core in HL maths and other first order DE's are part of the "Series and Differential Equations" option. We don't do 2nd order, which is a difference in syllabus but there are several things not included in A-level (or not at all boards).

    The one point I would agree with you is that IB HL Maths probably covers in the range 9-12 modules of A-level maths in terms of content, but then I would argue that the examination form, skills required to do the hardest questions etc. make up for the marginal lack of content meaning they're in the end not too different as indicators of mathematical knowledge/skill.
    Okay
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    The last few posts in this thread have been absolutely ridiculous. Please knock it off, because you're making some people a little angry. That goes to FuturDoc and Danny111

    Going back to the original topic of the thread, if your daughter can cope well with stress, is organized and is fairly decent in all her classes, she will absolutely get something out of the IB programme and get to the university of her choice. I, personally, have had a couple of long nights but the latest I have been up has been about 4:00 AM. That's just a warning in advance.

    In many ways, IB is what you put into it. If you put in a lot of effort to attain the required knowledge, you have every chance to excel in your studies! Please do consider this programme if you can cope with things...but everything about it is not as easy as you would think!

    New IB schools only complicate things more! Not knowing the standards you have to put your papers too and not knowing if your teachers will predict you correctly are certainly the only disadvantages I have come across as a member of a new IB school. Be careful with your course selection as well! You could end up with two free classes if you take IB Visual Arts, for example, or have only two or three classes off a semester (like me!) or never have any time off! (the poor souls that have to take Physics SL outside of school hours in order to meet the curriculum! They should have taken HL like me!) Either way, you should be able to get through all these difficulties.

    Good luck!
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    The thing is, you can choose between being a certificate and a diploma candidate.

    A certificate can pick and choose which IB classes/tests they want o take, while a diploma has to take all 6 areas IB.

    I opted for certificate in English, History and Biology, because I am terrible at math. This means I'm only required to do the two World Lit papers, the Group 4 project and the IA paper. I get out of CAS hours, TOK (which I took anyway) and the EE.

    And I think for diploma you're required to take SL tests, which universities (in the US, at least) don't accept for credit. Certificates are required, when they sign up for a test, to take the HL option.
    So basically, half the tests in diploma are useless for credit. Although it does make for a more well-rounded person...though after a while in IB all that matters is the GPA game. At least for me.
    In addition, many universities (again, I'm studying in the US) are reluctant to take IB (or AP) credit in the subject that the candidate is majoring in. My 5 on the APUSH test counts for nothing, thanks to our system. (AP US History....5 out of 5 had to brag).

    ALso, universities differ in the amount of credit they offer for a test score.

    I really recommend certificate, even if you test in all areas, because then you're assured credit.
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    I don't recommend certificate because the universities are looking for the Diploma.
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    (Original post by sherry_d)
    No way I would give her that choice. :mad: I would be mad to give her that choice right now. Of course I will consider her opinion but its downright to us where she goes at 11+ She will have many opportunities to make her own decision later including her A levels. I have been around to a few schools and she has loved one school simply because of the nice girly lockers they have. I will explain why we think the school is right for her. And in all honest most of your primary friends will not be your secondary friends even if you go to the same secondary school.
    There is a very successful person's parents that allowed this person to choose their secondary school because of the "glamourous" uniform that the pupils wore. This person would have been 12 going on 13. This person was born and raised in Northern England in 1930's, 40's and finished school in about '53. This person did well and was very happy at the school. If I had gone to private school my parents would asked me wether or not I liked the school, however, I am also sure that decision wouldn't have been made solely my like or dislike any such school. I would have also been about 13.
    Your daughter is the one that will be attending the school not you, therefore, her input is important.
    How many schools have you seen and how many has she seen with you? You should ask her if the lockers are the only thing she liked about the school? Ask her to wright down pro's/con's of each school that you have been to with her. What was girly about the lockers?
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    (Original post by sherry_d)
    Thank you, it seems there is no clear cut answer to my question. The school does GCSE and IGCSE at O level and it does seem to have emphasis on languages too. here is the bit in their prospectus.



    As you can see the school does in deed follow a curriculum in preparation for IB at A level and thus my worry that if my daughter turns out to love sciences then she may be at a disadvantage as the school really does prepare for the IB from the way I see it. We do love everything else about the school and even the IB. The school is very hard to get in so it may just end up being wishful thinking too is she doesnt get a place.

    I think we have to base our decision on what we feel is right for her now and then see how she gets on and what she will be interested in doing later for her A level. I am still convienced IB is the way to go but just wanted a little more information.
    This is a bit late, sorry, but I'm like your daughter- I'm a very sciency person. However, if she is good at English, and enjoys that and humanities, I would recommend that if she is prepared to work hard she should do the IB. I have applied for medicine, and although I haven't got offers this isn't because of my IB. I know that from my school last year, people who gained offers for, biology for example, didn't meet their IB offers but rang up the university on clearing day and managed to secure their place on the grounds that they got an excellent grade in their IB extended essay. Particularly in Scotland,the unis are becoming more aware of the IB and it will broaden your daughter's options if she wants to go abroad.
    However, if she truly is a scientist/mathematician and ends up hating languages and arts by GCSE, I'd say go for A levels.
 
 
 
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