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    (Original post by Teao the Cat)
    In scotland, they have the PGDE, which is essentially the same as a PGCE, but it's much harder to get work in scotland with a PGCE, whereas England takes the PGDE as being no different form PGCE.
    So it makes sense to try and get onto a postgrad education course in Scotland rather than England then. Though I take it it's harder to get a place for the PGDE?
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    (Original post by goose123)
    Sorry, someone else said that I could use a PGCE from an English university to teach so I'm not sure how those courses are relevant.

    About where my degree is from, if people with masters ad PhDs are preferable rather than people with personality and interpersonal skills I'm asking if an Oxford degree will be enough to get me past the intellectual snobbery hurdle.

    To restate the question then, if I have a degree from a respected university in England; teaching experience in Spain and France; and a willingness to learn Gaelic if I can get the support to do so, do I stand a chance at landing a secondary school teaching job in Ireland?

    Edit: just saw your comment about Irish, sorry for the ignorance
    sorry, I just wan't clear on what you wanted, yeah there were loads of teachers from the UK in my school but like I said earlier teaching jobs are really hard to get there right now and you often need to know someone to get a job. if you have the pgde then your undergrad doesn't matter so much. you must register with the teaching council of ireland though, if this is any help http://www.teachingcouncil.ie/regist...t.asp?NCID=480
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    (Original post by darigan)
    How about Irish people that lived'd in Ireland, went to school there and learned Irish.... I always called it gaelic :rolleyes:
    noone i've ever met in Ireland ever called it gaelic only when talking to americans, seriously
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    (Original post by bobsleigh)
    sorry, I just wan't clear on what you wanted, yeah there were loads of teachers from the UK in my school but like I said earlier teaching jobs are really hard to get there right now and you often need to know someone to get a job. if you have the pgde then your undergrad doesn't matter so much. you must register with the teaching council of ireland though, if this is any help http://www.teachingcouncil.ie/regist...t.asp?NCID=480
    Thanks very much, I'll definitely look through it. Thanks too for all the information on the Irish education system, it's really helpful


    Now I've just got to find some Irish headteacher to suck up too... :P
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    It may be a regional thing. I was born, raised and educated in the SE Ireland and always called it gaelic
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    (Original post by darigan)
    It may be a regional thing. I was born, raised and educated in the SE Ireland and always called it gaelic
    different strokes different folks i suppose, i'm a waterford person myself and I don't get cork people with their tanora
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    (Original post by bobsleigh)
    different strokes different folks i suppose, i'm a waterford person myself and I don't get cork people with their tanora
    Spent a few months at WIT, living near ballybeg, used to have the waxies play in the SU Bar (they were funnny for about 5 min), anyways, thats beside the point.
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    (Original post by goose123)
    So it makes sense to try and get onto a postgrad education course in Scotland rather than England then. Though I take it it's harder to get a place for the PGDE?
    If you want to teach in Sctoland, then definately go for PGDE. I don't think they are any harder to get on to, it's just that the Scots want to give jobs to people they have trained rather than giving them away to people just coming in who will likely bugger off after a couple of years, I think
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    A PGCE from england is fine to be teaching in the north of ireland, however you cant teach in a catholic school without getting a catholic teaching certificate so bear that in mind as most schools in the north are either catholic or protestant...although there are of course mixed religions too!
    In the north irish is taught too but is not compulsory and only taught in catholic schools so dont worry about that!

    p.s ive always called it irish or gaeilge...never gaelic!
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    (Original post by Eyes)
    We don't get a lot Spanish and Italian taught here so that would be nice, it's usually only French and German. I wish Spanish and Italian had been offered to me.

    Sorry I can't give any advice on the qualifications you need, but as far as potential difficulties with teaching go I think learning the curriculum here may be one.
    Hmm, I didn't realise Spanish wasn't widely taught outside of England. Still, I suppose French is still an option

    As far as the curriculum goes, French grammar is going to be the same in England and Scotland; the only thing that could be different is the level to which it's taught. Even if that's different I don't think it would cause much of a problem, and if different literature is studied I'd probably quite enjoy reading and preparing it anyway.
 
 
 
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