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    Looking at the cost of tuition at Oxford, it's really staggering how much internationals have to pay. Based on the fees calculator on the website, I calculated that for a basic arts degree, I would have to pay approx. 18,000 a year not including everyday living costs. Over 3 years you can expect to pay up to 60,000, approximately 100,000 usd. That is a lot of money to me.

    What's worse, because I'm from the developed world, there are no bursaries or scholarships available to me. This leads me to conclude that every single North American student currently studying at Oxford has to come from money... either their parents are funding their education, or they're taking out loans to cover it.. in which case, how did you come to the decision that an Oxford undergrad degree is even worth the almost 100,000 USD price tag?

    It's all really discouraging. Even if I get into Oxford, I would have to reject their offer because of the cost. So I'd really like to know how are the current international students (specifically those from North America) paying for their education if not through their parents?
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    How much does it cost for a degree in the US at an Ivy or equivalent standard uni?
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    Some British private schools cost more.. excellent education seems to come with a price in this country.
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    (Original post by taheki)
    Some British private schools cost more.. excellent education seems to come with a price in this country.
    In this country? Surely it's the same pretty much everywhere?

    Isn't it even worse in America?

    At least here, UK nationals pay the same for whatever university they attend so they're (arguably) there on merit rather than ability to pay ruling them out of the better ones. It's not the same for internationals but they don't pay taxes here so I think that's probably fair enough.
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    (Original post by lunchbox)
    Looking at the cost of tuition at Oxford, it's really staggering how much internationals have to pay. Based on the fees calculator on the website, I calculated that for a basic arts degree, I would have to pay approx. 18,000 a year not including everyday living costs. Over 3 years you can expect to pay up to 60,000, approximately 100,000 usd. That is a lot of money to me.

    What's worse, because I'm from the developed world, there are no bursaries or scholarships available to me. This leads me to conclude that every single North American student currently studying at Oxford has to come from money... either their parents are funding their education, or they're taking out loans to cover it.. in which case, how did you come to the decision that an Oxford undergrad degree is even worth the almost 100,000 USD price tag?

    It's all really discouraging. Even if I get into Oxford, I would have to reject their offer because of the cost. So I'd really like to know how are the current international students (specifically those from North America) paying for their education if not through their parents?
    You answered your own question. Their parents pay for it. I suppose some internationals might be funded through scholarships in their native countries or by companies there though. I know an international who is being paid for by a company in return for an agreement to work for them afterwards.

    (Original post by taheki)
    Some British private schools cost more.. excellent education seems to come with a price in this country.
    Apart from the fact that an Oxford degree only costs that much for non-EU internationals.
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    (Original post by Eric Arthur)
    How much does it cost for a degree in the US at an Ivy or equivalent standard uni?
    The cost is highly comparable, and the Oxford tuition is actually about $10,000 less per year; however, college fees, transportation, living expenses, etc. end up balancing it out so that either way, it works out to around $50,000 a year.

    The problem isn't so much in the monetary amount itself. In the U.S., it is very typical for students who do not receive sufficient scholarship/grant/etc. or whose parents are not extremely wealthy to take out a student loan, most notably the Stafford loan. Generally, these can be taken up to the full value needed for the cost of education, BUT for an overseas university, there is a maximum of $3500 per year, which is pretty useless, to be honest, as it accounts for about 7-8% of the yearly cost. Private loans, the remaining option, have extremely high interest rates in comparison.
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    So why not just stay in the US for undergrad then?
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    (Original post by pl224)
    The cost is highly comparable, and the Oxford tuition is actually about $10,000 less per year; however, college fees, transportation, living expenses, etc. end up balancing it out so that either way, it works out to around $50,000 a year.

    The problem isn't so much in the monetary amount itself. In the U.S., it is very typical for students who do not receive sufficient scholarship/grant/etc. or whose parents are not extremely wealthy to take out a student loan, most notably the Stafford loan. Generally, these can be taken up to the full value needed for the cost of education, BUT for an overseas university, there is a maximum of $3500 per year, which is pretty useless, to be honest, as it accounts for about 7-8% of the yearly cost. Private loans, the remaining option, have extremely high interest rates in comparison.
    So may I ask how you are paying for your Oxford course? Parents?

    I have to be honest and say that I am completely jealous of all the people who have parents able to afford the price of their overseas education. It seems almost disgustingly decadent to spend that kind of money on a bachelor's degree, even if it is for an education and an "investment for your future." But considering that it's an arts degree I'm after, and knowing that arts graduates tend to make the least of all subjects their first years out... it'll take me years to pay off my student loans. Is Oxford really worth that price tag?

    With all that said it's still a crying shame that someone bright enough to be admitted should have to turn a place down because of something as "simple" as money. If Oxford is really serious about attracting the best and brightest students in the world then they should have SOMETHING in place to ensure no one is turned away because of their inability to fund their studies. That includes internationals.

    But anyway, so that's it then? If your loans can't cover your costs, and your family is poor, then you're out? Is there nothing else one can do??
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    (Original post by lunchbox)
    With all that said it's still a crying shame that someone bright enough to be admitted should have to turn a place down because of something as "simple" as money. If Oxford is really serious about attracting the best and brightest students in the world then they should have SOMETHING in place to ensure no one is turned away because of their inability to fund their studies. That includes internationals.
    Magic? Oxford has a hell of a lot of things in place to ensure that UK residents are not turned away regardless of money, on top of the low fees and government support. However, the university is a government funded institution. The government pays for students coming from UK families because they're the ones paying for the university through tax. It covers EU students because of reciprocity between EU countries. Why should the UK taxpayers pay for places for students whose families have put nothing into the system and have no connection to the country? Particularly those from another first world country with its own outstanding universities?

    But anyway, so that's it then? If your loans can't cover your costs, and your family is poor, then you're out? Is there nothing else one can do??
    You could look for scholarships, as I said, some countries have such things in small numbers. You're coming off as massively over-entitled. The vast majority of people in the world are not even in a position to go to university at all, you seem to be heading towards throwing your toys out of the pram because you can't get someone to pay for you to go to a foreign country's best university.

    It's not like the USA lacks good universities and if you're as smart as you seem to think you are you should surely be able to get a scholarship at one of those.
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    (Original post by lunchbox)
    With all that said it's still a crying shame that someone bright enough to be admitted should have to turn a place down because of something as "simple" as money. If Oxford is really serious about attracting the best and brightest students in the world then they should have SOMETHING in place to ensure no one is turned away because of their inability to fund their studies. That includes internationals.

    But anyway, so that's it then? If your loans can't cover your costs, and your family is poor, then you're out? Is there nothing else one can do??
    If you're international, then yes. It sucks, but there are plenty of good universities in the U.S.A. so Oxford isn't really obliged to subsidise international students who want to come to Oxford but can't afford it. Education, like everything else, costs money, and universities are public institutions in the U.K. unlike the U.S. so the money comes from tax-payers pockets, so although Oxford is serious about "attracting the best and brightest students" its not really fair for them to spend British tax-payers' money on funding an international student's education.

    It's just the same situation in reverse for British students wishing to study at top American schools, apart from the fees are possibly even higher at Ivy Leagues, so I don't really see how the situation can be deemed unfair.

    Edit - oops sorry I typed slower but have essentially said the same stuff as Teebs!
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    (Original post by rocks_and_mountains)
    Edit - oops sorry I typed slower but have essentially said the same stuff as Teebs!
    You said it slightly more kindly. Also, not all of the US' universities are private institutions, if anything most are publically funded by state governments. It's just the most well known (and presumably best) ones that are all private.
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    (Original post by Teebs)
    You said it slightly more kindly. Also, not all of the US' universities are private institutions, if anything most are publically funded by state governments. It's just the most well known (and presumably best) ones that are all private.
    That's true, I sort of knew that somewhere in my mind, but I think I'm right in saying that all the universities comparable to Oxbridge are privately funded?
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    (Original post by Eric Arthur)
    So why not just stay in the US for undergrad then?
    Obviously the decision varies by individual, but personally, I probably will decide to attend university in the U.S. in part for financial reasons. Regardless, there are of course still qualities of Oxford that motivated me (and I would guess some others) to apply in the first place, such as the tutorial system and greater focus on a single course. I know that no university is going to be perfect in every aspect, though, and there are many excellent universities in the U.S. that could be expected to offer as good an experience, educational and otherwise, as Oxford.

    (Original post by lunchbox)
    So may I ask how you are paying for your Oxford course? Parents?
    As mentioned above, I may decline my offer on primarily financial reasons, but if not, I expect I would take out a private loan for the majority of the cost and personally fund the living expenses. I'm not from an extremely wealthy family where my parents can simply pay off the entire sum like it's almost nothing.
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    (Original post by rocks_and_mountains)
    That's true, I sort of knew that somewhere in my mind, but I think I'm right in saying that all the universities comparable to Oxbridge are privately funded?
    Depends who you ask.
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    (Original post by rocks_and_mountains)
    That's true, I sort of knew that somewhere in my mind, but I think I'm right in saying that all the universities comparable to Oxbridge are privately funded?
    Well I've seen UC Berkeley (a public-funded university in California) above Oxford on some tables (http://www.arwu.org/ARWU2009.jsp).

    To the OP: I do empathise with you and I feel as though some of the responses were a bit harsh. :dontknow: I'm doing a lot of essay contests and all those small prizes really do add up. I recommend writing like Oxford hangs in the balance because it does. You and I both knew when embarking on this adventure that it wouldn't be easy...
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    (Original post by rocks_and_mountains)
    It's just the same situation in reverse for British students wishing to study at top American schools, apart from the fees are possibly even higher at Ivy Leagues, so I don't really see how the situation can be deemed unfair.!
    It's really not the same situation at all. Last time I checked, Harvard, Yale, Princeton, Dartmouth, MIT and some other schools offered need-blind admissions to international students (i.e. that internationals qualify for as much financial aid as US students without it hindering their chances of admission). Columbia, Penn, Caltech and the rest of the top schools in the US offer limited financial aid to internationals, but aid is still attainable if the applicant is a top student.

    For me, it'd probably be a bit cheaper to study in one of the top schools in the US, even though I qualify for the EU fees in the UK. I did a lot of research on this as I almost completed applications to US schools back in late '08 (I did the SATs, had an MIT interview, etc.).
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    My friend from Australia said it works out a lot cheaper for her to come here than to go to university in the States, and in fact, anywhere outside her state in Australia. However, she gets some sort of scholarship from some Australian thing, so she doesn't have to pay too much (though she still spent 9 months working after her exams so that she could afford it.)
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    (Original post by Roundabout)
    It's really not the same situation at all. Last time I checked, Harvard, Yale, Princeton, Dartmouth, MIT and some other schools offered need-blind admissions to international students (i.e. that internationals qualify for as much financial aid as US students without it hindering their chances of admission). Columbia, Penn, Caltech and the rest of the top schools in the US offer limited financial aid to internationals, but aid is still attainable if the applicant is a top student.
    This. :yep:
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    (Original post by Roundabout)
    It's really not the same situation at all. Last time I checked, Harvard, Yale, Princeton, Dartmouth, MIT and some other schools offered need-blind admissions to international students (i.e. that internationals qualify for as much financial aid as US students without it hindering their chances of admission). Columbia, Penn, Caltech and the rest of the top schools in the US offer limited financial aid to internationals, but aid is still attainable if the applicant is a top student.
    Let's analyse your needs blind for international students universities...

    Harvard: $25b endowment between 20,000 students.
    Dartmouth: $3b endowment between under 6,000 students.
    Yale: $16b endowment between 18,000 students
    Princeton: $12.5b endowment between 12,500 students
    MIT: $8b endowment between 10,000 students.

    The total Oxford endowment is roughly $8b for 19,500 students which compares poorly with every one of those universities. The fact that Oxford also makes a loss on undergraduate education for all EU students while the universities you've listed are private institutions getting gigantic amounts of money off the majority of them also helps them be able to follow the policy.

    I maintain that complaining that you can't go to another country's state run university at domestic rates is demonstrative of an over-developed sense of self-entitlement.
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    (Original post by Teebs)
    Let's analyse your needs blind for international students universities...

    Harvard: $25b endowment between 20,000 students.
    Dartmouth: $3b endowment between under 6,000 students.
    Yale: $16b endowment between 18,000 students
    Princeton: $12.5b endowment between 12,500 students
    MIT: $8b endowment between 10,000 students.

    The total Oxford endowment is roughly $8b for 19,500 students which compares poorly with every one of those universities. The fact that Oxford also makes a loss on undergraduate education for all EU students while the universities you've listed are private institutions getting gigantic amounts of money off the majority of them also helps them be able to follow the policy.

    I maintain that complaining that you can't go to another country's state run university at domestic rates is demonstrative of an over-developed sense of self-entitlement.
    My point was that it's not the same in reverse. Nowhere did I say that Oxford should offer financial aid to internationals.

    the universities you've listed are private institutions getting gigantic amounts of money off the majority of them also helps them be able to follow the policy.
    BS. 2/3 of Harvard students receive financial aid, with the average financial aid package at around $40000 (and since tuition is about $33k, on average they charge no tuition and in fact give aid towards other costs). They anticipate giving out nearly $150M in financial aid during 2009-2010.
 
 
 
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