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    Hey, speaking as a first year medic here I thought the same as you pretty much. At Oxford we don't deal with whole bodies at once or do any dissections ourselves unless we specifically organise it but we do get prosections in the gross anatomy labs every Wednesday.

    I must say I've been a bit squeamish even when looking at live patients, I've fainted before and I had to leave the room the first time I saw the prosections because I just found the whole experience a bit overwhelming. After that the next week I spent genuinely worrying about getting used to it but I went to the next session, instead of standing up I had a stool and I got through it fine.

    Now i'm poking around in there with the rest of them :'D
    Nothing really prepares you for that sort of experience, it's so surreal to think of them as once people but they're not anymore. They're just specimens.

    I'd say go for it, very few people in our class had a problem ( I think I was the only one in my group, which didn't help) It's common to feel a little bit wierd but don't let something trivial like that hold you back from what you really want to do in life.

    You never know you may be fine with it, even if you're not at first you will get used to it. Seriously, within two weeks I was absolutely fine.

    Good luck with applications and stuff, feel free to message me if you have any questions
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    I know that quite a few unis don't use whole bodies, only the relevant bits that you are looking at, like the arm, for example. Peninsula don't do dissection at all, instead they make 3d models of things and there are images you can manipulate on the computer and strip back the different layers and rotate as much as you like. I heard at the open day they say that if there;s a view of something you want that doesn't exist, they'll make it for you. They have a v dedicated IT department. In Southampton Uni, the dissection room is above the kitchens for the hospital, so as you work you can always smell chips I think you'll find you are stronger than you think and will be able to do it when it comes down to it, your curiosity will get the better of you.
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    (Original post by PaperCutz)
    Hey, speaking as a first year medic here I thought the same as you pretty much. At Oxford we don't deal with whole bodies at once or do any dissections ourselves unless we specifically organise it but we do get prosections in the gross anatomy labs every Wednesday.

    I must say I've been a bit squeamish even when looking at live patients, I've fainted before and I had to leave the room the first time I saw the prosections because I just found the whole experience a bit overwhelming. After that the next week I spent genuinely worrying about getting used to it but I went to the next session, instead of standing up I had a stool and I got through it fine.

    Now i'm poking around in there with the rest of them :'D
    Nothing really prepares you for that sort of experience, it's so surreal to think of them as once people but they're not anymore. They're just specimens.

    I'd say go for it, very few people in our class had a problem ( I think I was the only one in my group, which didn't help) It's common to feel a little bit wierd but don't let something trivial like that hold you back from what you really want to do in life.

    You never know you may be fine with it, even if you're not at first you will get used to it. Seriously, within two weeks I was absolutely fine.

    Good luck with applications and stuff, feel free to message me if you have any questions
    (Original post by ilovehotchocolate)
    I know that quite a few unis don't use whole bodies, only the relevant bits that you are looking at, like the arm, for example. Peninsula don't do dissection at all, instead they make 3d models of things and there are images you can manipulate on the computer and strip back the different layers and rotate as much as you like. I heard at the open day they say that if there;s a view of something you want that doesn't exist, they'll make it for you. They have a v dedicated IT department. In Southampton Uni, the dissection room is above the kitchens for the hospital, so as you work you can always smell chips I think you'll find you are stronger than you think and will be able to do it when it comes down to it, your curiosity will get the better of you.
    Thanks made me feel a lot better about it all. Just trying to get the grades now and everything else now I guess
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    (Original post by Gemma2010)
    I've been wanting to apply for medicine, deadline is October already.

    There's just one thing I'm unsure of - disecting human bodies
    Is it just me? because everyone seems to want to do medicine, do they know you have to do this at some point... Also know one ever seems to mention it, bit odd.

    I really want to be a doctor and if people died in hospital, I *could* cope. I could do surgery too, it's just the disecting thing. I realise it helps you understand, but I also don't understand :confused: why some people seem to get excited about it. It's such a serious issue. Even at college when people are chucking lambs hearts about :mad:

    Should I not apply because of this? I can't imagine disecting one day and going about my life the next. Apparently you have a body and you disect it one stage at a time and you have to half the face with a saw and take the brain out! Sounds like real horror
    dissection is a common source of angst for new medics, but firstly the medical school give you all the support you need and ease you into it quite gently. People get 'excited' about it because it is a completely fascinating and privledged activity to do, it is a very special opportunity and I personally think it is extremely valuable to my education although a lot of people dispute how valuable it is.

    Although this sounds odd to you, you begin to forget that the cadaver was once a human and it becomes more of an anatomical specimen, mostly because it looks dead, not at all look any human you have seen. Also remember that the people who donated them wanted to give you that opportunity.

    I would say it is a reason to apply to a dissecting school, I think it is very worthwhile but that's just my opinion.
 
 
 

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