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    Wahey this could be interesting; how my philosophy degree will be worthless before I've even started it :/. No idea what I'm going to do neither but hell I have some time before I really need to decide. Best of luck
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    I'm a teacher and can maybe help you with a couple of these.

    I currently operate as an unqualified teacher in an independent school, so can't help you with the PGCE question :o:

    However, I've also never been the most confident person in the world either and it definitely doesn't stop you from teaching. You just have to swallow it quick and get on with things! I'm also totally different now to how I was in my first year at uni; those extra years add a bit more maturity and confidence when it comes to getting up in front of a class. The only thing you may find a bit tricky (and I admit it's my weakest point too) is behaviour management (worst with Y8 for me - my other classes are fine) so even if you don't do a PGCE it's worth going on a course just for that. The rest is just being organised and knowing your subject...everything else sort of writes itself.

    It's also not too late (at all!) to get relevant work experience. I had a bit from when I was in the sixth form, but after that I didn't do any until I was on my master's and I still didn't have trouble finding employment in a good international school that has several sites. Join SAS at your uni if possible (I would have done this but it clashed with other things I was doing at uni), do the Aimhigher scheme if you can, and ring up local schools to see if you can come in one afternoon a week, even if it's only to observe.
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    (Original post by somethingbeautiful)
    1) My degree is Philosophy - not a curricular subject. Is it even possible for me to do a PGCE?

    2) Frankly, I'm not a confident person. Have I lost before I've even left the blocks?

    3) I have no experience. I'm in 1st year. Is it too late or can I start now?

    Thanks for any responses. To be completely honest, my dream job is to be a writer but I've no idea how to achieve that so I figured teaching seems practical...
    First of all, I will say that this forum is largely directed towards postgraduate education, rather than just postgraduate options generally. So you might find the careers forums equally useful, at least for some of your more general queries.

    e: Okay, this thread has been moved now.

    But:

    i) It is possible to get onto a PGCE course with a degree in a non-curriculum subject. See here. It is harder, apparently, and will require you to stress your experience in curriculum subjects. But it can be done.

    ii) I don't really think anyone here can analyse your psychological make-up; and I don't think they should even really try. But, to me, "confidence" has something to do with preparation and experience. You probably lack confidence right now because you're unsure of your goals and how to reach them. Once you establish what it is you would like to do, then you can build up relevant skills and experience and work to that end.

    iii) I would guess that very few people have significant work experience at your age. And, of course, "experience" isn't just, like, a general thing that one obtains incrementally by some standard process. Experience is only of certain things; or in certain areas. I don't think there is much point in trying to attain work experience if you don't even know what field you would like to go into yet.

    I would also say:

    iv) There is no reason why you can't view creative writing (I guess that's what you mean rather than, say, journalism) as a serious option. Go for it by all means. Are you writing presently? Have you tried / are you trying to get published or in some way noticed? If you are (and even if you aren't yet, really, but are willing to start in earnest), then writing as a career is a reasonable aim. You may, in time, wish to look into Creative Writing MAs.

    v) You're young. You have plenty of time to decide what you want to do; even if your university is telling you otherwise (and no doubt it has one eye on graduate employment statistics in this regard). Don't jump into something because it seems "practical" / safe. I started down that road, and hated it. Fortunately, I am much nearer to where I would like to be now.
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    I just had one extra comment on Bread and Circlejerks' excellent post. I'm another one who's trying to write for a living. I have written two novels and am in the process of sending them off to agents; I did a lot of student journalism and creative-writing related things at university; I also keep two blogs, one of which has netted me a very valuable portfolio of PR contacts and gets me products and invitations to press events on a regular basis; and, additionally, I often send article propositions to newspaper and magazine editors (which is very tough and frustrating when most of them don't want to hear from you). So certainly writing for a living is a dream that can be pursued, but the reality is that you also have to pay the bills while you're doing it. Sadly. You are right to be considering other career options so that you can at least afford to live while you're trying to achieve your dreams
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    I've got onto an RE PGCE course with a philosophy degree, if that's what you want to teach. Likewise, my friend got in for primary with a philosophy degree. I reckon I managed to get to the interview stage because I had a strong A-level in RE and a degree in philosophy could even be seen as more useful than a degree in RE when it comes to teaching the difficult philosophy and ethics A-level stuff.
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    I'd suggest getting some experience in schools to see if you like the idea of teaching. I've seen some pretty grim stuff now and it hasn't put me off one bit, but I know a lot of people who've thought it sounded interesting and were put off by experience. Obviously volunteering as a TA or observing aren't anything like being a teacher, but if you hate your volunteering experience chances are that it's definitely not for you.
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    (Original post by Jigglypuff)
    I've got onto an RE PGCE course with a philosophy degree, if that's what you want to teach. Likewise, my friend got in for primary with a philosophy degree. I reckon I managed to get to the interview stage because I had a strong A-level in RE and a degree in philosophy could even be seen as more useful than a degree in RE when it comes to teaching the difficult philosophy and ethics A-level stuff.
    What university was that, if you dont mind me asking? I have A Level RS too, I'm not sure that mine would be considered 'strong' though - I achieved a B, not bad but not outstanding.
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    (Original post by somethingbeautiful)
    My uni is pushing us to think of what career we want after our degrees and I am (as I have always been) completely at sea. I change my mind all the time and have done since I was about 4.
    But I need to stop pissing around now and get realisitc - I need to settle on some sort of career idea which is achievable. But I'm not sure what...

    I'm thinking of teaching but I've got a few Q's:

    1) My degree is Philosophy - not a curricular subject. Is it even possible for me to do a PGCE? doesnt matter. my friend has a degree in media and is trainning to be a maths teacher, she just has to do a few extra modulars

    2) Frankly, I'm not a confident person. Have I lost before I've even left the blocks? your only in your first year, you have time to get some teaching experience and build yourself up.

    3) I have no experience. I'm in 1st year. Is it too late or can I start now?
    no you have loads of time.

    Thanks for any responses. To be completely honest, my dream job is to be a writer but I've no idea how to achieve that so I figured teaching seems practical...

    .....see answers in red
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    I have just been accepted onto a primary pgce with a politics degree. Wasn't a problem it was not a national curriculum. I just pointed out my other assets.

    If you think about yourself you will probably find skills that you could easily apply to the national curriculum. Get as much experience as possible, visit your university volunteering office, or just write to schools.

    So yes perfectly possible but my first step would definitely be to go into a school and check you like it!
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    (Original post by somethingbeautiful)
    What university was that, if you dont mind me asking? I have A Level RS too, I'm not sure that mine would be considered 'strong' though - I achieved a B, not bad but not outstanding.
    Oxford Uni. To be honest, it's probably more about your potential as a teacher than your subject knowledge...the latter can always be improved!
 
 
 
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