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    (Original post by Xenopus)
    You could just put second class, and that would avoid lying or revealing the truth. People reading your CV might just presume it was an upper second class, if they state that they have that as their requirement, as people with a lower second would know not to apply. If you do lie, don't let them find out.
    You can't do that on a drop down list. very few grad schemes take CVs.
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    Lying about your degree grade is a one-stop shop to failure. Even if you were able to slip through the net initially, as soon as the firm did an audit you'd be out the door, and with a terrible reference to boot.

    As other have said, your best bet is to try and explain things on your covering letter, or to contact HR directly and explain the nature of your situation.
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    (Original post by solusoracle)
    Thanks for calling me a moron, moron!

    Why should I be punished for almost dying whilst at University? None of the application forms give you a chance to explain exceptional circumstances like mine.
    Because you didn't achieve the grade, so who knows what you are capable of. Do you really think that another applicant, that may or may not have got the grade, should be punished because of your illness?

    Your situation must be frustrating, but perhaps if things were so bad then you should have taken a year out. Sorry that I'm not very sympathetic, but I don't know what you expected posting this.
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    ^ I'm a bit more sympathetic than Dyer, but you should be aware that a lot of employers will take his viewpoint. They'll ultimately be asking themselves: why didn't you get extenuating circumstances to pull up your grade, and failing that why didn't you take a year out?

    Regardless, you really have to make do with what you've got. Failing the cover letter/HR option, there are stil a few graduate schemes that accept 2:2's, and you might be wise to focus your efforts on these.
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    (Original post by Bramlow)
    ^ I'm a bit more sympathetic than Dyer, but you should be aware that a lot of employers will take his viewpoint. They'll ultimately be asking themselves: why didn't you get extenuating circumstances to pull up your grade, and failing that why didn't you take a year out?

    Regardless, you really have to make do with what you've got. Failing the cover letter/HR option, there are stil a few graduate schemes that accept 2:2's, and you might be wise to focus your efforts on these.
    TBH I thought that I might have had a little more sympathy overall.

    I wonder how other people would feel if they were an A*/A GCSE student with 3xAs and 1xB at A Level who was accepted into one of the top universities and expecting a 1st or 2:1 only to have an inopportune, serious illness take your dreams away from you?

    Extenuating circumstances can only pull your grade up so far and retaking a year was not an option open to me as coming from a poorer background I simply could not afford it.

    I have been applying to the schemes which only require a 2:2 only to get feedback stating that the volume of applicants was so great that they looked to people with a better academic record and more relevant experience first.

    Although I have some work experience from before University I have very little relevant experience because I was too ill to undertake the internships that I was accepted onto.

    I genuinely feel like life has screwed me over and that most of the graduate schemes have little leeway for problems of this magnitude. Jobs where you apply direct to the employer or through recruitment agencies have been much more forgiving to this situation.

    In no way to I advocate lying for a job application, it is quite frankly stupid and you will get found out and dismissed eventually. However, I believe that given the opportunity to speak to some of the HR people face to face and explain the details of my circumstances that I would be able to progress past the initial stages of an application. The majority state that they take into consideration a whole host of factors throughout an application but lets face it, a person with a 2:1 or higher is going to be more attractive from an employers point of view so I currently get put promptly into the rejected pile.
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    (Original post by solusoracle)
    Should I just put 2:1 on the application forms and then explain the situation later or continue to be frustrated and turned away from positions I know I am more than good enough for?

    That isn't right!! It may not have been your fault for being ill in the first place, but if the degree really means a lot to you and the job then you should have stayed an extra year and completed what you missed.

    If you do lie, I hope you get caught!
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    TBH I thought that I might have had a little more sympathy overall.

    I wonder how other people would feel if they were an A*/A GCSE student with 3xAs and 1xB at A Level who was accepted into one of the top universities and expecting a 1st or 2:1 only to have an inopportune, serious illness take your dreams away from you?

    Extenuating circumstances can only pull your grade up so far and retaking a year was not an option open to me as coming from a poorer background I simply could not afford it.

    I have been applying to the schemes which only require a 2:2 only to get feedback stating that the volume of applicants was so great that they looked to people with a better academic record and more relevant experience first.

    Although I have some work experience from before University I have very little relevant experience because I was too ill to undertake the internships that I was accepted onto.

    I genuinely feel like life has screwed me over and that most of the graduate schemes have little leeway for problems of this magnitude. Jobs where you apply direct to the employer or through recruitment agencies have been much more forgiving to this situation.

    In no way to I advocate lying for a job application, it is quite frankly stupid and you will get found out and dismissed eventually. However, I believe that given the opportunity to speak to some of the HR people face to face and explain the details of my circumstances that I would be able to progress past the initial stages of an application. The majority state that they take into consideration a whole host of factors throughout an application but lets face it, a person with a 2:1 or higher is going to be more attractive from an employers point of view so I currently get put promptly into the rejected pile.
    Don't get me wrong: I completely appreciate the situation you're in, and I know that in reality it's not always possible to "just repeat a year". I'm just telling it how I think a lot of employers will see it.

    The application process for graduate jobs is not about "fairness", as such. It's simply about getting consistently good people recruited. Because of the economics of the recruitment market (i.e. waaay more grads than grad jobs), firms have to take a pretty broad brush approach when they handle things. They don't tend to take long thinking about the rights or wrongs of things at the pre-interview stage, they just make the decision to get the numbers down.

    I would also make the point that the entire 2:1/2:2 division is an anomaly, and is purely used to ease selection. There is absolutely no correlation that 2:1's do better than 2:2's in business, and there have been quite detailed longitudinal studies into this. It's also worth asking the question: is a 2:2 from a top institution not worth more than a 2:1 from an average one? (A question to which the application process generally answers: no).

    However...this is the situation we face, and you have to work with what you've got. I think your best bet is to be as proactive as possible and work as many leads as you can. If I were you I would:

    a) talk to my careers service about this (you can invariably do this after graduation)
    b) phone your tutors and explain the situation to them, have them on hand to corroborate your story if the time comes to do that
    c) network as much as possible and try and get in touch with HR departments to explain your situation
    d) play the numbers game and simply plug away at as many channels as you can.

    It might be helpful if you told us WHICH top university you went to, and also what particular fields you're interested in going into.
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    I'm not saying it's a clever thing to do, but I know two people who have lied about their degree classification (1 who says they got a first when they got a 2.1 and one who says that have a 2.1 when they don't have a degree. at all.) and neither of them have ever come unstuck with it...

    one works in the Civil Service (in central government offices, i won't say which department, but you have to be ******* good to get in there) and the other works in fashion PR.

    I also know lots of people who lie and certainly well over-embellish work exerience, volunteering work etc....

    I don't condone it at all, and I probably wouldn't do it, but you could probably get away with it (depeding on the company).
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    Don't lie about your degree grade.

    You definitely won't get a job then.
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    (Original post by JellyBean123)
    Maybe you could get a reference from a university tutor who could offer a brief explanation as to why you didn't achieve your expected grade?
    This, along with a covering letter. If the application form doesn't offer the opportunity to do this, then find a relevant e-mail adress and in the title put something along the lines of 'Re: ___ ____ Application'

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    I'm not saying it's a clever thing to do, but I know two people who have lied about their degree classification (1 who says they got a first when they got a 2.1 and one who says that have a 2.1 when they don't have a degree. at all.) and neither of them have ever come unstuck with it...

    one works in the Civil Service (in central government offices, i won't say which department, but you have to be ******* good to get in there) and the other works in fashion PR.
    I can't speak for your friends, but for most graduate schemes I know of you'll be asked for your degree certificate as a minimum, and very often your A Level certificates as well.
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    (Original post by thesuperficial)
    one works in the Civil Service (in central government offices, i won't say which department, but you have to be ******* good to get in there)
    I was asked for my transcript when I took up my post.
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    If you want to get sued for fraud then yeah, lie.

    If you think you can get a 2:1/1st, then do a few more resits and get the grade.
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    You clown - lying on an application form is one of the few reasons for instant dismissal with no appeal!
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    (Original post by Quady)
    I was asked for my transcript when I took up my post.
    This!
    The other person is telling porkies!
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    (Original post by Thingeh)
    If you think you can get a 2:1/1st, then do a few more resits and get the grade.
    The OP has graduated though.
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    (Original post by Thingeh)
    If you want to get sued for fraud then yeah, lie.

    If you think you can get a 2:1/1st, then do a few more resits and get the grade.
    Not an option. You are capped at 40% for re sits. This is the reason why I have a 2:2 and not higher.

    I don't intend to lie much. Just enough to get through the first stage of the application process where I would then be able to be honest and explain the situation.

    If I don't get any further from there once the truth is out, fair enough. I just want the opportunity to have an interview face to face where personality and other skills can come through rather than being instantly cast aside at the first stage for a poor result which was not my fault.
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    (Original post by solusoracle)
    Thanks for calling me a moron, moron!

    Why should I be punished for almost dying whilst at University? None of the application forms give you a chance to explain exceptional circumstances like mine.
    Funny, it's almost as if there's MORE brutality in the real world... That's not what I'd have expected either!
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    (Original post by solusoracle)
    I don't intend to lie much. Just enough to get through the first stage of the application process where I would then be able to be honest and explain the situation.
    Explain that you're dishonest? You'd be better off running the risk.

    Have you applied for the diplomatic service thats a 2.2.

    Many companies do allow you to put in the circs on why you did badly.

    However, surely thats already been factored in during the moderation meeting...?
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    It's your call, but I think you're overestimating your ability to explain things post-facto here. Employers will invariably check your degree certificate, and once they see something's inconsistent they won't accept any explanation.

    I suppose there might be an argument for trying this tactic on firms that have already told you they won't accept 2:2 applications even under your circumstances. In these cases, perhaps you have nothing to lose.
 
 
 
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