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Are too many people at university? watch

  • View Poll Results: Are too many people at university?
    Yes
    80.24%
    No
    19.76%

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    I think there aren't enough places on degrees which directly relate to jobs, such as Medicine, Nursing, Midwifery and Engineering. It's a shame as people with these degrees have the potential to do something useful with their knowledge and not end up doing a totally unrelated job from their unusual degree.

    Academic degrees such as maths should possibly add more practical elements which help their students gain jobs once they graduate.
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    (Original post by cpj1987)
    I certainly don't think so, personally. I'd take no issue with EVERYONE attending university.
    A prime example of someone who shouldn't be at university.
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    I can't stand it when people say the only worthwhile degrees are the Sciences.

    Honestly, you would have no idea how to even read or write without English so how about you think before you throw stupid comments like that into the mix.
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    (Original post by TShadow383)
    I think that Uni should be for the straight-A or near enough students
    Maybe with the lower ones accepting BBB or something.
    The rest of the demand can be served by colleges and vocational courses.
    How about those of us who had massive family problems during the entirety of A Levels?

    Its hard to get straight A's when your head is somewhere else. Are we not deserving of a place at University just because we don't conform to your ridiculous ideal?
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    I started to read replies but got a bit bored so I'll just add my opinion.

    I don't think so at all. I think too many go for the wrong reason and not enough get the chance early enough, although I know a lot is being done to change all of that. I actually don't know a large amount of people who went/are going to university. It isn't just the area I am from either, it was the same when I moved to Dorset for a while. I know of a few that did who I went to school with, but very few. My neices and nephew are all in the same school too, one just now in sixth form and she doesn't want to go either. The thing is, I only really learnt and understood about university in the last two years through my ex who had a really good private education. My parent still don't really understand it at all and I find it almost sad. I feel quite worried about not graduating until I'm 26, 27 after my masters but I guess better late than not at all right?
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    (Original post by Kaykiie)
    I can't stand it when people say the only worthwhile degrees are the Sciences.

    Honestly, you would have no idea how to even read or write without English so how about you think before you throw stupid comments like that into the mix.
    Shakespear managed to muddle alone fine.

    Why wouldn't we be able to read or write without having been formally taught english past year nine?
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    (Original post by Repressor)
    Economics is slightly related to science.

    Law is a crazy world.
    Economics is also a social science
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    (Original post by Sweekune)
    I think there aren't enough places on degrees which directly relate to jobs, such as Medicine, Nursing, Midwifery and Engineering. It's a shame as people with these degrees have the potential to do something useful with their knowledge and not end up doing a totally unrelated job from their unusual degree.

    Academic degrees such as maths should possibly add more practical elements which help their students gain jobs once they graduate.
    Nursing and Midwifery shouldn't even need degrees!!!

    The whole point of Uni is supossed to be academic education so to make courses less academic isn't the solution. It should be the other way round.
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    (Original post by Quady)
    Shakespear managed to muddle alone fine.

    Why wouldn't we be able to read or write without having been formally taught english past year nine?
    At some point you are taught to read and write. So English is important. You would not even be speaking this language without the knowledge being passed on, so honestly don't try and make comments about English not being important.

    Plus the first Dictionaries were around before Shakespeare, so he was obviously aware of English.
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    (Original post by Wyrd14)
    I think you're wrong. I went from Bs and Cs at A-Level to a Masters with Distinction at UCL and an AHRC-funded PhD, and that's in medieval English and Latin literature. Are you saying I would have been better suited to a vocational course?

    Not everyone reaches their academic peak at 16-18.
    (Original post by Kaykiie)
    How about those of us who had massive family problems during the entirety of A Levels?

    Its hard to get straight A's when your head is somewhere else. Are we not deserving of a place at University just because we don't conform to your ridiculous ideal?
    Well, even with increased standards, you could do a semi-decent college course in the subject you want a degree in for a year or maybe two if you're struggling and stand a much better chance of a place. It's not like the A-levels are your only chance to prove yourself.

    My father failed all of his O-levels and A-levels (he's a recovering ex-catholic and was taught by nuns at school) and moved up through a couple of college courses to get an MEng 1st class in electrical engineering from Manchester - Now works for philips.

    Still, he didn't go straight to uni - there's nothing wrong with working your way up for a bit before you go if your school results are nothing to shout about.
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    (Original post by TShadow383)
    Well, even with increased standards, you could do a semi-decent college course in the subject you want a degree in for a year or maybe two if you're struggling and stand a much better chance of a place. It's not like the A-levels are your only chance to prove yourself.

    My father failed all of his O-levels and A-levels (he's a recovering ex-catholic and was taught by nuns at school) and moved up through a couple of college courses to get an MEng 1st class in electrical engineering from Manchester - Now works for philips.

    Still, he didn't go straight to uni - there's nothing wrong with working your way up for a bit before you go if your school results are nothing to shout about.
    Well how do you suppose we support ourselves on this 'college course'?

    Your stance frustrates me so much I'm not going to continue this further.
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    (Original post by FinishHim!)
    Law is a con? Economics is a con?
    I once knew someone with a degree in law who could only get a job down at the co-op.
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    (Original post by Kaykiie)
    Well how do you suppose we support ourselves on this 'college course'?

    Your stance frustrates me so much I'm not going to continue this further.
    You could, uh, work?
    As outlandish as it may sound you don't get a decent education without being prepared to work hard for it.
    And don't speak about college courses like they're dirt. Most of the ex-polys and such are offering what is essentially a trumped-up college course anyway. Realistically all I'm asking for is that they call it that.
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    (Original post by Kaykiie)
    At some point you are taught to read and write. So English is important. You would not even be speaking this language without the knowledge being passed on, so honestly don't try and make comments about English not being important.

    Plus the first Dictionaries were around before Shakespeare, so he was obviously aware of English.
    I did say past year nine, ie whats the point in doing GCSEs/A Level/Degrees in it? Although to be fair some people do need to be taught english past year nine since they wouldn't be able to get a grade C to show competance.

    Plus the first alphabetical english dictionary was written in 1604. Since Shakespear wasn't consistant with his spelling why would you have thought he had access to a dictionary?
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    (Original post by CJ99)
    Nursing and Midwifery shouldn't even need degrees!!!

    The whole point of Uni is supossed to be academic education so to make courses less academic isn't the solution. It should be the other way round.
    On the contrary, the amount of work nurses need to do for a degree nowadays is far from scarce and much more demanding than, say, a mathematics degree. I mean, they have trouble fitting it into the academic semesters and also have to do placements around terms and throughout holidays to build up experience.

    I find it amusing that you'd feel safer in the hands of a nurse who skipped education and just jumped into the nearest hospital than someone who has taken 3 years to perfect their skills, considering they control and administer all your medications.

    But, of course, you neither go to university or do a nursing degree so you can still kindly shove your ignorant words up your ****
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    [QUOTE=FinishHim!]Is this thus devaluing degrees, providing more unemployed graduates and making university an expected 'thing' to do, rather than for education and career prospects? [QUOTE]
    One can only hope that our society is drifting away from severe class divisions, therefore i agree with this statement. Im going to be studying at a good uni next eyar and it sucks that **** unis and bummy students are going to take away the value of my hard work. :yep:
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    (Original post by Repressor)
    Yeah, it really isn't worth it if you're not doing a Science related degree.

    SOCIAL SCIENCES AREN'T REAL SCIENCES.

    You're being conned.
    Social Sciences concerns the science of society. Which is a subject from which you can draw facts, theories, conduct experiments and ultimately form laws from. Just because it doesn't involve mixing chemicals or cutting up someone's insides doen't mean it isnt a science.
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    (Original post by Quady)
    Since when was Law a social science? Its a BA
    Law is not a BA. It's an LLB.

    And it is a social science. Perhaps the greatest social science of all since it involves creating laws based on social phenomena (just like the law of gravity is based on physical phenomena)
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    I think that all the "rubbish" universities should be scrapped e.g. polytechnics. I just don't see the point in a degree that barely does anything to your career prospects. It takes hard work and commitment to get top grades and therefore only people who are prepared to put that hard work and commitment into their studies should be given the privilege of going to University. You don't have to be rich to get top grades. My college isn't exactly great, most of the people who go there are not rich, yet quite a few people still come out with AAA/AAB etc, which is enough to get you into any good uni. I just don't see why the government should waste it's time subsidising loans and uni fees for people to have a good social life. Then we would have a better funded NHS, better education (primary, secondary, higher, further) etc.
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    I think thats true and I think people are pushed into university too much - other options aren't given.
    But then again I didn't get amazing A-levels, have applied to a few ex-polys and am doing a social science so not many of you would think I should be going to uni. :rolleyes:

    Although I plan to save, work harder and do a Masters rather then sit and complain that other people getting degrees has made it too hard for me. :cool:

    (Original post by mayh3m)
    On the contrary, the amount of work nurses need to do for a degree nowadays is far from scarce and much more demanding than, say, a mathematics degree. I mean, they have trouble fitting it into the academic semesters and also have to do placements around terms and throughout holidays to build up experience.

    I find it amusing that you'd feel safer in the hands of a nurse who skipped education and just jumped into the nearest hospital than someone who has taken 3 years to perfect their skills, considering they control and administer all your medications.

    But, of course, you neither go to university or do a nursing degree so you can still kindly shove your ignorant words up your ****
    He didn't say that nurses shouldn't do any training just not degrees. That's a different argument but I personally would feel safer in the hands of a nurse who did better in placements and practical work rather then the nurse who got 100% in a biology exam.
 
 
 
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