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  • View Poll Results: Are too many people at university?
    Yes
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    No
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    (Original post by edmMonster)
    Social Sciences concerns the science of society. Which is a subject from which you can draw facts, theories, conduct experiments and ultimately form laws from. Just because it doesn't involve mixing chemicals or cutting up someone's insides doen't mean it isnt a science.
    I wasn't saying they're totally useless I was merely suggesting that the student loan/debt thing really isn't worth it if you're just going to be ******* around with a meager amount of lectures.

    (Original post by SpiritedAway)
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    I suppose having a breakthrough in Economics is almost as good as a breakthrough in Physics/Chemistry/Biology/Medicine.

    **** trying to solve cancer and getting practically free energy, I want to study the production, distribution, and consumption of goods and services. :rolleyes:.

    (Original post by biffyclyro27)
    .
    I notice that you don't mention the company that you're going to be working for?

    Same reason as above really, what are you getting out of doing that? Nothing really advances you're just doing the same thing over and over.

    Oh, and to the peeps who negged me... Nice of you to leave your names at least.
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    (Original post by moomin_love)
    I think that all the "rubbish" universities should be scrapped e.g. polytechnics. I just don't see the point in a degree that barely does anything to your career prospects. It takes hard work and commitment to get top grades and therefore only people who are prepared to put that hard work and commitment into their studies should be given the privilege of going to University. You don't have to be rich to get top grades. My college isn't exactly great, most of the people who go there are not rich, yet quite a few people still come out with AAA/AAB etc, which is enough to get you into any good uni. I just don't see why the government should waste it's time subsidising loans and uni fees for people to have a good social life. Then we would have a better funded NHS, better education (primary, secondary, higher, further) etc.
    So most teaching courses should go?
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    (Original post by DaneCook)
    And this is wrong how? If they are intelligent enough to grasp the concepts being taught on their course, who are you to say they shouldn't attain a degree?
    I haven't said that at all. Don't twist my words. Yes, they need to be intelligent enough - they also need to be interested enough, and not just motivated by money.

    (Original post by DaneCook)
    I'm interested in learning new things, but at the end of the day the only reason I'm at University is to better myself, by partaking in activities that make me stand out to employers. I achieve my goals efficiently, I learn the concepts required to pass my modules, and get excellent grades. If I was less interested in writing essays I wouldn't pass my course as I study Accounting & Finance.
    Ah, you study Accounting & Finance. That explains it!

    (Original post by DaneCook)
    Basically, I do the MINIMAL work required to get a first class at University, would you chastise me for not putting in any extra effort simply because I can? Why should I? The effort I put in now (Which isn't even 60%) is already sufficient to get the top grades, so why try harder?
    It hasn't got anything to do with trying harder :confused: the whole point of a degree is that you are studying something you are interested in, surely? Therefore it shouldn't be a problem - wouldn't you be putting in lots of effort anyway, because you enjoyed it?


    Education should be for education's sake. Sadly, money is valued far more than learning these days.
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    It's not a question of there being too many people going to university, it is that most of them are doing worthless degrees. I would be happy to see 43% of the population going to university is everyone was doing a degree that enhanced their career prospects, but unfortunately while we have tens of thousands of people doing media related degrees (among others) this will not be the case.
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    too many kids are mis-informed about academia and the real world of work, and I think that schools are accountable for much of that. That said, degrees are changing, 'university' is changing, religion is changing, *the world is changing*; so perhaps people should actually leave the education system alone, as it has been fiddled with excessively to date, and try to be more understanding of change?
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    (Original post by Natasha_c)
    But then again I didn't get amazing A-levels, have applied to a few ex-polys and am doing a social science so not many of you would think I should be going to uni. :rolleyes:
    Correct.

    Or rather I think you should, but that you should pay for it.
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    (Original post by mayh3m)
    On the contrary, the amount of work nurses need to do for a degree nowadays is far from scarce and much more demanding than, say, a mathematics degree. I mean, they have trouble fitting it into the academic semesters and also have to do placements around terms and throughout holidays to build up experience.

    I find it amusing that you'd feel safer in the hands of a nurse who skipped education and just jumped into the nearest hospital than someone who has taken 3 years to perfect their skills, considering they control and administer all your medications.

    But, of course, you neither go to university or do a nursing degree so you can still kindly shove your ignorant words up your ****
    Funny you should choose the degree I'm actually planning to do!

    My gran was a nurse as was my mum and my aunt and uncle are doctors and my papa was a head surgeon at Ninewells in Dundee and the opinion that you shouldn't a degree to be a nurse or a midwife is one they all share so actually its not ignorant at all. Why do poeple on the internet constantly assume anyone who disagrees with them is ignorant?:rolleyes:

    You clearly didn't understand the point at all. The point wasn't that nurses or midwifes are such low jobs that you shouldn't need a degree to do them. But that the skills needed to be a nurse or midwife aren't those that a degree can supply.

    The doctors job is to figure out whats wrong with you and what treatment to give you.
    The nurses is to make sure you get you medician, that your comfortable, to talk to patients put them at ease, to make the doctor has what they need etc.

    As many doctors will tell compared to what nurses used to be before degrees nurses aren't many nurses any more just under qualified doctors.
    I've heard Doctors complain that nursing graduates complain when asked to clean bedpans or give a disabled person a bath. And nowdays rather than give the medicine the doctor recomends to patients they ask why not give them this or that instead when they're not qualified to make that call. And when the doctor complains about any of these the answer is always but I'm a graduate.
    Thus why many doctors disagree with nurses needing degrees.

    So next time engagae your brain and do some research before calling someone ignorant.

    I would feel safer in the hands of a nurse who was a good nurse than a graduate who wasn't.
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    (Original post by Repressor)
    I suppose having a breakthrough in Economics is almost as good as a breakthrough in Physics/Chemistry/Biology/Medicine.

    **** trying to solve cancer and getting practically free energy, I want to study the production, distribution, and consumption of goods and services. :rolleyes:.
    Theres not much point in an anti cancer drug or practically free energy if you can't produce, distribute or get people to consume it...
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    (Original post by Repressor)
    Yeah, it really isn't worth it if you're not doing a Science related degree.

    SOCIAL SCIENCES AREN'T REAL SCIENCES.

    You're being conned.

    This is what the media wants us to believe. There are people out there with media studies degrees, who managed to get graduate jobs. In these cases I would say, yes, it was worth it- but i acknowledge this is probably a smaller percentage than graduates from more traditional subjects.

    baisically you just dissed all arts subjects. History/English/Business/Economics/Law/Accounting and Finance/IR/ Languages are all well-respected degrees also, and some have the added advantage of being relevant to the majority of jobs out there, which you really say for sciences!
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    (Original post by Quady)
    I did say past year nine, ie whats the point in doing GCSEs/A Level/Degrees in it? Although to be fair some people do need to be taught english past year nine since they wouldn't be able to get a grade C to show competance.

    Plus the first alphabetical english dictionary was written in 1604. Since Shakespear wasn't consistant with his spelling why would you have thought he had access to a dictionary?
    Actually the first dictionary was around in 1538 - Thomas Elyot: Latin / English dictionary.

    There was more after that too, so Shakespeare would have had access to one.
    There was also no real standardisation of spelling back then, which is why his spelling was not consistant.

    If English was not taught past year nine then how would we gain qualifications in it, to allow us to teach it?
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    (Original post by Talveer)
    Why do people think doing an art related degree is stupid?

    A Bachelor of Arts degree has been around for absolutely ages and is just a respected as a BsC
    You're new. You'll learn about the ignorance on this forum soon enough.
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    (Original post by Kaykiie)
    Actually the first dictionary was around in 1538 - Thomas Elyot: Latin / English dictionary.

    There was more after that too, so Shakespeare would have had access to one.
    There was also no real standardisation of spelling back then, which is why his spelling was not consistant.

    If English was not taught past year nine then how would we gain qualifications in it, to allow us to teach it?
    A bilingual glossary isn't a dictionary, evan a thesaurus is closer.

    I didn't say teachers wouldn't need a PGCE anymore which already has English tests and is a qualification.
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    (Original post by HJV)
    Yeah, all that politics stuff, pointless. I mean what do we need the United Nations for, just scrap it. Diplomatic service? Nah, we don't need to maintain relations with other countries.

    Demographics? What's the point of being able to predict population shifts, who cares about pensions 20 years down the line.

    Pedagogy? We don't need to know about effective ways to teach people stuff.

    History? It's in the past so why bother.

    Languages? Well that's pointless now since we already decided above not to keep in touch with other countries.
    *EDIT* - I think I may have jumped the gun on this one. If I did, I apologise (I'm at work and haven't had chance to read the entire thread!), but I will still leave these post up as I'm fighting the corner of Arts & Humanties students.

    Hmm you certainly seem sure of yourself, however your comments here make you look like a moron. I hope you are joking?

    For one, the comment about history being all in the past so "why bother" is laughable. EVERYTHING up until this present second in time is in the past, so are we to disregard the study of the importance and achievements of every past generation? I will laugh even more if you ever dream of being famous, because when your dead and gone, maybe we should say "his in the past, why bother?" Also, it has been discovered that there are more History graduates on the Board of Directors of companies in the UK than from any other discipline.

    Demographics - Yes, it concerns PEOPLE, you know, human beings - the species we belong to? But no, that's not important either.

    Pedagogy - Hmm, I hope you have kids one day, so you can somehow explain to them that you don't believe TEACHING is important. Gee, of course it isn't, it's just the foundation of every ******* discipline being passed on to the next generation in the whole world.

    Languages - No, your right, we don't need bilingual or trilingual people. At the next meeting of World Leaders, let them all confuse eachother to the point of blowing the world to bits with nukes.

    "Hey, Barack only asked for a can of beer, why did you nuke Russia dude?"

    And hey, next time your in another country, make sure your fluent in their native tongue yeah? No-one will be around to translate after all.

    And it's the Politicians who have all the POWER incase you didn't realise. They are the ones who could have you holding a gun in a foreign land one day fighting a World war you don't even believe in. But hey, all that Politics stuff, yeah that's not important, it only concerns the running and maintainance of the entire world, so why bother? YOU ****.

    I take it you do some kind of numbers related subject? Well I say this - I'd much rather spend my life studying Art, Languages, People, Education, History and WORDS than be some ******* numbers geek stuck pondering numbers all day long for the sake of making an extra couple of thousand. Words are infinitely more powerful in my life than numbers will ever be.

    No combination of numbers ever made me cry.

    So yeah, these subjects do matter to some people. Show some respect.

    Rant over.
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    (Original post by Quady)
    A bilingual glossary isn't a dictionary, evan a thesaurus is closer.

    I didn't say teachers wouldn't need a PGCE anymore which already has English tests and is a qualification.
    That being said there was still other dictionaries around in Shakespeare's time. (This is not the point I am making).

    You need a degree to do a PGCE though. If you intend to teach high school students then your degree must relate to the subject you want to teach. Which means that you need A Levels in that subject to get onto that degree and so on.

    So teaching English only up to year 9 isn't really a feasible idea, is it?
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    (Original post by HighestKungFu)
    Hmm you certainly seem sure of yourself, however your comments here make you look like a moron. I hope you are joking?

    For one, the comment about history being all in the past so "why bother" is laughable. EVERYTHING up until this present second in time is in the past, so are we to disregard the study of the importance and achievements of every past generation? I will laugh even more if you ever dream of being famous, because when your dead and gone, maybe we should say "his in the past, why bother?"

    Demographics - Yes, it concerns PEOPLE, you know, human beings - the species we belong to? But no, that's not important either.

    Pedagogy - Hmm, I hope you have kids one day, so you can somehow explain to them that you don't believe TEACHING is important. Gee, of course it isn't, it's just the foundation of every ******* discipline being passed on to the next generation in the whole world.

    Languages - No, your right, we don't need bilingual or trilingual people. At the next meeting of World Leaders, let them all confuse eachother to the point of blowing the world to bits with nukes.

    "Hey, Barack only asked for a can of beer, why did you nuke Russia dude?"

    And hey, next time your in another country, make sure your fluent in their native tongue yeah? No-one will be around to translate after all.

    And it's the Politicians who have all the POWER incase you didn't realise. They are the ones who could have you holding a gun in a foreign land one day fighting a World war you don't even believe in. But hey, all that Politics stuff, yeah that's not important, it only concerns the running and maintainance of the entire world, so why bother? YOU ****.

    I take it you do some kind of numbers related subject? Well I say this - I'd much rather spend my life studying Art, Languages, People, Education, History and WORDS than be some ******* numbers geek stuck pondering numbers all day long for the sake of making an extra couple of thousand. Words are infinitely more powerful in my life than numbers will ever be.

    No combination of numbers ever made me cry.

    So yeah, these subjects do matter to some people. Show some respect.

    Rant over.
    Honestly, I think they were being sarcastic
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    (Original post by microfatcat)
    What point are you trying to make? A degree in English does not teach you how to speak it unless you're foreign or something
    I'm talking about English in general. Read the thread rather than zoning in on one comment.

    Plus a degree in English is needed to teach children English, so people should really think before they say silly things.
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    Yes.
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    (Original post by Kaykiie)
    That being said there was still other dictionaries around in Shakespeare's time. (This is not the point I am making).

    You need a degree to do a PGCE though. If you intend to teach high school students then your degree must relate to the subject you want to teach. Which means that you need A Levels in that subject to get onto that degree and so on.

    So teaching English only up to year 9 isn't really a feasible idea, is it?
    Logic error.

    If you don't have degrees in English you don't need an A-Level in English. If there isn't an A Level to teach then there is no need for a degree in it. The PGCE would qualify you to teach year nine.
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    (Original post by cpj1987)
    I certainly don't think so, personally. I'd take no issue with EVERYONE attending university.
    Even if you are paying for it?
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    (Original post by Quady)
    Logic error.

    If you don't have degrees in English you don't need an A-Level in English. If there isn't an A Level to teach then there is no need for a degree in it.
    But how would you determine who was good enough to do the PGCE to then teach the bloody thing?

    LOGIC FAIL.
 
 
 
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