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Are too many people at university? watch

  • View Poll Results: Are too many people at university?
    Yes
    80.24%
    No
    19.76%

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    (Original post by Talveer)
    I think he was taking the piss mate, But I agree.
    In retrospect I think I jumped the gun on this thread. I'm at work so I'm reading between e-mails etc LOL, if I did I apologise but I'm still fighting the corner for all Arts & Humanties students.
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    (Original post by StadtJunky)
    Even if you are paying for it?
    That would depend how much. Obviously, it's not practical for everyone to be paying £1000 extra per year just to begin to cover all those extra costs, but I take no issue to my taxes going to fund others in the same way that I was lucky enough to be funded, if that would be what it took.

    As I say, it's all hypothetical - there just aren't the spaces or the funds to afford everyone the opportunity, but I'd like it if there were.
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    (Original post by Kaykiie)
    But how would you determine who was good enough to do the PGCE to then teach the bloody thing?

    LOGIC FAIL.
    From their application, ie degree, ECs and interviews - same as now.
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    (Original post by Quady)
    From their application, ie degree, ECs and interviews - same as now.
    If the only worthwhile degrees are the Sciences then why would people on them want to teach English after three years of Physics (for example).

    To be honest I wouldn't want someone with a degree in Maths to be teaching me English.

    Your argument is a massive fail.
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    (Original post by HighestKungFu)
    Hmm you certainly seem sure of yourself, however your comments here make you look like a moron. I hope you are joking?

    For one, the comment about history being all in the past so "why bother" is laughable. EVERYTHING up until this present second in time is in the past, so are we to disregard the study of the importance and achievements of every past generation? I will laugh even more if you ever dream of being famous, because when your dead and gone, maybe we should say "his in the past, why bother?"

    Demographics - Yes, it concerns PEOPLE, you know, human beings - the species we belong to? But no, that's not important either.

    Pedagogy - Hmm, I hope you have kids one day, so you can somehow explain to them that you don't believe TEACHING is important. Gee, of course it isn't, it's just the foundation of every ******* discipline being passed on to the next generation in the whole world.

    Languages - No, your right, we don't need bilingual or trilingual people. At the next meeting of World Leaders, let them all confuse eachother to the point of blowing the world to bits with nukes.

    "Hey, Barack only asked for a can of beer, why did you nuke Russia dude?"

    And hey, next time your in another country, make sure your fluent in their native tongue yeah? No-one will be around to translate after all.

    And it's the Politicians who have all the POWER incase you didn't realise. They are the ones who could have you holding a gun in a foreign land one day fighting a World war you don't even believe in. But hey, all that Politics stuff, yeah that's not important, it only concerns the running and maintainance of the entire world, so why bother? YOU ****.

    I take it you do some kind of numbers related subject? Well I say this - I'd much rather spend my life studying Art, Languages, People, Education, History and WORDS than be some ******* numbers geek stuck pondering numbers all day long for the sake of making an extra couple of thousand. Words are infinitely more powerful in my life than numbers will ever be.

    No combination of numbers ever made me cry.

    So yeah, these subjects do matter to some people. Show some respect.

    Rant over.
    Politicans are servants, they serve us, they can't make any real decisions for themselves, we the public and their party members must say it's OK. Therefore, they have no real power at all.
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    (Original post by Talveer)
    Yeah yeah, I don't think anyone really can say a course is **** and a doss unless they have actually been on it. Having a friend who just dossed about and happens to be on the course is not a reliable source for every person and university doing that course in the whole of UK. :yep:
    I agree, and also, some people just want to have the university experience or to study a subject they like and are interested in as opposed to one which promises a huge salary at the end of it (and not everyone gets one anyway).

    I respect Medicine/Law/Engineering/Economics students greatly, however I don't think everyone goes into it for the right reasons. You are not guarunteed a huge salary at the end of it, and if you have to spend your whole life doing something you don't really feel passionate about for the sake of making a big salary (and also working very hard and very long hours in the process) then I also think that is quite unfortunate as well.

    Do what you love and do it often, that's my philosophy. But this is a very subjective topic and I am just giving my two cents really .
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    (Original post by cpj1987)
    That would depend how much. Obviously, it's not practical for everyone to be paying £1000 extra per year just to begin to cover all those extra costs, but I take no issue to my taxes going to fund others in the same way that I was lucky enough to be funded, if that would be what it took.

    As I say, it's all hypothetical - there just aren't the spaces or the funds to afford everyone the opportunity, but I'd like it if there were.
    I guess it's a personal thing. I wouldn't be happy paying heavy taxes for students to study certain subjects with no or very little real world application.
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    (Original post by HighestKungFu)
    I agree, and also, some people just want to have the university experience or to study a subject they like and are interested in as opposed to one which promises a huge salary at the end of it (and not everyone gets one anyway).

    I respect Medicine/Law/Engineering/Economics students greatly, however I don't think everyone goes into it for the right reasons. You are not guarunteed a huge salary at the end of it, and if you have to spend your whole life doing something you don't really feel passionate about for the sake of making a big salary (and also working very hard and very long hours in the process) then I also think that is quite unfortunate as well.

    Do what you love and do it often, that's my philosophy. But this is a very subjective topic and I am just giving my two cents really .
    No one starts out at the top of the pile anyway. If these science grads think they are going to walk out of university into a stable £100k+ job right out of the bat then they have a lot of learning to do. A good friend of mine got a degree in microbiological sciences and sadly his job at the moment is working as a lab technician blending up vegetable samples for evaluation. He earns around £23k a year. It sucks man.
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    (Original post by HighestKungFu)
    I agree, and also, some people just want to have the university experience or to study a subject they like and are interested in as opposed to one which promises a huge salary at the end of it (and not everyone gets one anyway).

    I respect Medicine/Law/Engineering/Economics students greatly, however I don't think everyone goes into it for the right reasons. You are not guarunteed a huge salary at the end of it, and if you have to spend your whole life doing something you don't really feel passionate about for the sake of making a big salary (and also working very hard and very long hours in the process) then I also think that is quite unfortunate as well.

    Do what you love and do it often, that's my philosophy. But this is a very subjective topic and I am just giving my two cents really .
    Everyone works for money. Persoanally, I don't know anyone who works for "passion".
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    (Original post by Talveer)
    What would you class as real work application though? A science job? Is that the only real work application there is according to many here it is.
    I don't know, I tend to think about it the other way around, i.e subjects with no real world application e.g history.
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    (Original post by StadtJunky)
    Everyone works for money. Persoanally, I don't know anyone who works for "passion".
    :wavey: I did
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    (Original post by FinishHim!)
    Law is a con? Economics is a con?
    If society changed. Ie no courts or no real economy.
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    (Original post by Lindsey123)
    Last semester one of my course friends asked me if 'no one' was one words or two..
    Get over yourself. That's a pretty common question because it can either be hyphenated "no-one" or two words no one but you say it as one word so you might assume it is one word.

    Personally, yes, I think there are way too many people at University I think there should be an alternative that isn't University and isn't work or vocational training, something like another 2 years of A Level or a lower standard of degree that lasts a shorter time. At the end of college I think there's no real alternative for most people than work or University and it means people who go into work at that juncture aren't skilled and people and that probably forces a lot of people into a bad degree when they aren't ready or properly suited for it.

    So I'd encourage all these Metropolitan Universities and ex-Polys to offer something of a Degree Lite. 2 years, you come out qualified and with some life skills having lived on your own for 2 years. Maybe do them in more than one subject, not sure.
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    (Original post by cpj1987)
    :wavey: I did
    So you don't get paid?
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    (Original post by Talveer)
    No one starts out at the top of the pile anyway. If these science grads think they are going to walk out of university into a stable £100k+ job right out of the bat then they have a lot of learning to do. A good friend of mine got a degree in microbiological sciences and sadly his job at the moment is working as a lab technician blending up vegetable samples for evaluation. He earns around £23k a year. It sucks man.
    Thats 4k above the average grad starting salary.
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    In many ways British universities are over subscribed. Some of the people who go are genuinely thick.

    BUT. Im sure thats always been the case.
    It does seem though that alot of people simply go to get drunk and do bugger all. I'm sure if you cut all those people out it would be alot better.
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    (Original post by StadtJunky)
    Everyone works for money. Persoanally, I don't know anyone who works for "passion".
    In a literal sense you are right however there is a distinction between "working to live" and "living to work". By passion I mean that you would do the kind of job you are doing for free or for much less money because you feel strongly about what you are doing and believe in what you are doing.

    I also admit that eventually most jobs become laborious and tiresome, and the joy can go out of the window.

    I will always remember one conversation I had with my GP once. I asked him one day "do you like being a Doctor?" I was tempted as a child to go down that path, however I guess his response sums up my logic. He said: -

    "I sit in this room all day on my own and the only people that come to see me are either sick or miserable."

    You can tell he chose money over passion.
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    (Original post by Talveer)
    Who said anything about not getting paid. Its called "Working" for a passion not "charity for a passion" people need money to live. Working for a passion means you get that money by doing something you love.

    Not that hard to understand, although maybe it is if all you care about in the world is money.
    I'm passionate about history, but it doesn't pay the bills. Do you see my dilemma?
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    (Original post by Talveer)
    Yes you don't have a good job. Find one then that does. Either by moving to where the jobs are or by making connections.

    Its who you know not what you know.
    I have a good job.

    You can't do what I do just by "knowing someone".
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    err no. Who honestly cares how many people go to uni? It doesn't affect you, assuming that your reason is that "they aren't smart enough" or other nonsense then you will get a stronger degree anyway.

    Unless your argument is that your course is overbooked, but I struggle to see that being true.
 
 
 
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