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    I really want to go to LSE....
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    (Original post by CityMonkey)
    Hahaha, dude have you ever perused the course content of MSc Fin degrees at Gimperial/LSE etc? Every single MSc Finance degree is a complete dud, by definition. You think any of the banks give a **** about any of the models taught on those degrees? There is absolutely 0 respect for having an MSc Fin degree on bank trading floors, and besides, the course is little more than mathematical masturbation and a cash cow for lowly paid university professors who couldn't trade an option if it bit their **** off. Besides, I would never employ anyone who pays £30,000 for the privilege of learning something which, to all intents and purposes, can be self-taught in about 3 weeks with Hull/other such text book purely by proxy that they can't tell a good trade from a bad one.

    Yes, it makes sense for some people but only for those not at redbrick schools to uprate the cahcet their degree holds to HR so that they will consider passing CVs to the traders/bankers.
    if you can teach yourself stochastic calculus then fair enough. not all of us are the next merton.

    personally i want to go into structuring where an MSc is much more applicable. i did not do maths or engineering at undergrad. and i don't want to be a trader.
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    (Original post by ghostrider88)
    lse students are overrated. they have no intellectual ambition, they're just happy to enter the factory and emerge with a BB job. networking, sucking ****, doing whatever it takes. it's pretty sad really, thank god i don't go there.
    Another TOP POST.
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    (Original post by awm55)
    if you can teach yourself stochastic calculus then fair enough. not all of us are the next merton.

    personally i want to go into structuring where an MSc is much more applicable. i did not do maths or engineering at undergrad. and i don't want to be a trader.
    Dude, you don't need to be a genius to self-learn stochastics. If you're structuring material, you should be fairly comfortable going through Hull by yourself. But I guess it makes sense for you if you didn't do a quanty subject in undergrad. But realise that even then most of the models etc that they will teach you, will be completely academic and hence by definition largely meaningless.
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    (Original post by awm55)
    if you can teach yourself stochastic calculus then fair enough. not all of us are the next merton.

    personally i want to go into structuring where an MSc is much more applicable. i did not do maths or engineering at undergrad. and i don't want to be a trader.
    Exactly my situation.
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    (Original post by CityMonkey)
    Dude, you don't need to be a genius to self-learn stochastics. If you're structuring material, you should be fairly comfortable going through Hull by yourself. But I guess it makes sense for you if you didn't do a quanty subject in undergrad. But realise that even then most of the models etc that they will teach you, will be completely academic and hence by definition largely meaningless.
    Which book by Hull are you refering too - just had a quick look on Amazon and there appear to be a couple of similar books by him - which would you recommend?
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    (Original post by dark_link)
    Which book by Hull are you refering too - just had a quick look on Amazon and there appear to be a couple of similar books by him - which would you recommend?
    "Options, Futures and Other Derivatives" aka "The Bible"

    PS: I have the PDF, if you want
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    (Original post by awm55)
    if you can teach yourself stochastic calculus then fair enough. not all of us are the next merton.

    personally i want to go into structuring where an MSc is much more applicable. i did not do maths or engineering at undergrad. and i don't want to be a trader.

    Sorry to go back to this post, but WTF??? You know you want to do structuring but you don't have the confidence to pick up Hull's bible or Taleb or a book on stochastic calculus and learn it yourself?? You'd rather spend £30k on a course to learn **** that a) you can learn yourself b) fellow structuring grads alongside you won't even have bothered learning through a masters? Show some initiative mate.

    Sounds like another LSE type eh CityMonkey.
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    (Original post by ghostrider88)
    Sorry to go back to this post, but WTF??? You know you want to do structuring but you don't have the confidence to pick up Hull's bible or Taleb or a book on stochastic calculus and learn it yourself?? You'd rather spend £30k on a course to learn **** that a) you can learn yourself b) fellow structuring grads alongside you won't even have bothered learning through a masters? Show some initiative mate.

    Sounds like another LSE type eh CityMonkey.
    you are a joke, use your head. you cannot get onto a structuring desk unless you have done a very quant undergrad degree or have done an MSc. i have not done a quant undergrad degree (which i have stated many times) so I need to do an MSc...end of story

    and in all actuality, Hull's book is actually quite basic in the grand scheme of things.

    if you can convince a bank that you have the skills to be a structurer after doing a BA because you "taught yourself", then the bank is probs not worth working for.

    and to top it off, my MSc is likely to be fully paid for by an IB so go **** off.
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    (Original post by awm55)
    you cannot get onto a structuring desk unless you have done a very quant undergrad degree or have done an MSc.

    Ha ha ha. I GUARANTEE you this is not true, I know 2 people who have taken this route successfully because they made up on their lack of quant skills before their internships by working hard on these areas, not wasting 30k on a masters (which I highly, highly doubt will be paid for by a BB). Whatever though, a little bit of initiative would save you 30k, one year out of the business and a lot of hassle. Good luck with the whole structuring thing, hope it works out for you.
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    (Original post by ghostrider88)
    Ha ha ha. I GUARANTEE you this is not true, I know 2 people who have taken this route successfully because they made up on their lack of quant skills before their internships by working hard on these areas, not wasting 30k on a masters (which I highly, highly doubt will be paid for by a BB). Whatever though, a little bit of initiative would save you 30k, one year out of the business and a lot of hassle. Good luck with the whole structuring thing, hope it works out for you.
    - Some banks prefer candidates with MSc or with very quant backgrounds (particularly French ones)
    - Not all structuring desks are equal: some develop quite simple products (notes, baskets, etc..), others develop very complex products or bespoke solutions. The former requires some notions you can easily acquire reading Hull or similar books, the latter requires advanced knowledges that it's difficult to acquire just reading some books.
    - Hull is basic. It's the textbook used in basic derivatives courses.
    - 30k is a lot. There are many MSc programs that cost way less.
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    (Original post by ghostrider88)
    Ha ha ha. I GUARANTEE you this is not true, I know 2 people who have taken this route successfully because they made up on their lack of quant skills before their internships by working hard on these areas, not wasting 30k on a masters (which I highly, highly doubt will be paid for by a BB). Whatever though, a little bit of initiative would save you 30k, one year out of the business and a lot of hassle. Good luck with the whole structuring thing, hope it works out for you.
    I don't buy this. Your friend got an internship on a structuring desk while doing a BA? Barcap, JPMorgan, Merrill all basically require engineering at undergrad before they will consider you.
    Whatever bank hired your friend must have been desperate.
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    (Original post by awm55)
    I don't buy this. Your friend got an internship on a structuring desk while doing a BA? Barcap, JPMorgan, Merrill all basically require engineering at undergrad before they will consider you.
    Whatever bank hired your friend must have been desperate.
    fx structuring, top 3 global BB (hate this rubbish 'top 3' terminology but i'm sure you get what I mean). economics at lse. chose all non-quant courses. definitely not desperate, he was just better than the msc interns, and without a 30k postgrad qualification.
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    (Original post by ghostrider88)
    fx structuring, top 3 global BB (hate this rubbish 'top 3' terminology but i'm sure you get what I mean). economics at lse. chose all non-quant courses. definitely not desperate, he was just better than the msc interns, and without a 30k postgrad qualification.
    you just proved my point. he did a BSc undergrad and the bank did not know he did not do any technical modules. not to mention the compulsory modules on LSE economics (intermediate econometrics etc) are fairly quantitative anyway. i did a BA, which is totally different!

    the fact he was better than the MSc interns is irrelevant. they could have done an MSc in something totally unrelated to finance, and your friend having gone to LSE probably had a better grip on finance related topics than they did anyway.
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    I don't understand what's unusual about somebody in Structuring with just a BSc, I've met Warwick and UCL Economists without MScs in Structuring.
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    (Original post by loggins)
    I don't understand what's unusual about somebody in Structuring with just a BSc, I've met Warwick and UCL Economists without MScs in Structuring.
    that is my point. i did a BA not a BSc, hence why I want to do an MSc.
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    (Original post by awm55)
    that is my point. i did a BA not a BSc, hence why I want to do an MSc.
    This is rapidly turning into an awm55 agony aunt forum but just a couple of further points

    1) I think you're overestimating the difference between a BA and BSc - the LSE BA Economics course is hardly different to plenty of BA Economics courses up and down the country (Oxford and Cambridge to give but two).... to suggest there is as big a difference as you make out is stupid.

    2) IF, as you imply, you haven't even done some basic econometrics (or whatever equivalent mathematical/statistical work) as part of your undergraduate degree (i.e. you do a BA with NO mathematical content), but want to be a structurer, I think (and just my personal opinion) you're taking a harder route... plenty of BA students get quantitative trading roles... just requires hard work as I said in my first post.

    Either way, good luck.
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    When people say that any degree from Oxbridge is wanted by IBs, does the same apply to LSE?
    I have an offer for BSc management sciences and I want to work in FO and a BB firm.
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    (Original post by gyyy2807)
    When people say that any degree from Oxbridge is wanted by IBs, does the same apply to LSE?
    I have an offer for BSc management sciences and I want to work in FO and a BB firm.
    Is not that IBs want any degree. They want you to do economics, finance, physics, engineering...

    Can you get in with a non-related degree from a reputable university? YES. But the proliferation of people who want to work in banking but for some reason want to do a degree in sociology is rather worrying.

    Even more so at the MSc level (when you should have your career path more clear), doing finance will help you to get into finance.
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