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    I was brought up in family where we were all "labelled" with one religion. Religious ceremonies and celebrations etc are nice, and belonging to a religion sort of gives me a sense of being a part of something, and a sense of belonging to a community. When I have my own kids I'll bring them up as Jewish as well, because I think it's nice to have a connection with the rest of your family and with a larger group of people outside of your own relatives, and it's nice to feel like you belong somewhere and to have a cultural identity etc etc.

    I don't really believe in God though, and I wouldn't describe myself as an Atheist, but I've not really believed that there definitely is a God since I was about 10 years old. So it's not like I was "brainwashed" or anything - children grow up into adults who are perfectly capable of making their own decisions and finding their own identities. I don't think religion is a bad thing for children; it's nice to believe that there's someone up there looking out for you, and whether that's true or not doesn't really matter. We all lie to our kids about Santa and the tooth fairy, so how is God any different?

    I know the campaign's not just about religion, but the sense of community applies to most labels. We label children as "Welsh", "British", "Glaswegian" etc, and I don't see how that's okay, but giving children other "labels" relating to the cultural, religious and political backgrounds of their families is somehow wrong.
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    I think it's a wonderful advert. My parents did just that with me, didn't force their views on me but allowed me to make up my own mind as an adult. I happen to have turned out athiest (Or rather a humanist!). It isn't mine or anyone elses right to impose their belief on a child.

    It's the greatest thing my parents have ever done for me, and they've done some pretty awesome stuff.

    EDIT: The most infuriating thing I find is people who get their children christened but are not in any way religious.
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    (Original post by AshMcD)
    EDIT: The most infuriating thing I find is people who get their children christened but are not in any way religious.
    Why is that infuriating? Just out of interest. I agree that it seems pretty pointless from a religious point of view, but if they want to do it for the sake of family tradition then I don't see how that's a problem.
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    Parents have the right to raise their children as they see fit, and as they are required by their religious beliefs. Anything else seems to be unnecessary intervention in the privacy of the family.
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    I don't see why bringing a child up in a religion, and then letting them choose whether to continue when adult constitutes labelling.
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    (Original post by moregano)
    Why is that infuriating? Just out of interest. I agree that it seems pretty pointless from a religious point of view, but if they want to do it for the sake of family tradition then I don't see how that's a problem.
    Because it's hypocrisy at its most blatent level. Blindly doing something you think you should do for the sake of family tradition? It's tying that child into a religion it may have absolutely no interest in. It's simple, allow the child to grow up and make their own decision.

    Although, I suppose christening a child is preferable to what certain other religions do to their children, particularly their young boys :eek:
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    I think it's a great idea!

    Your religous beliefs shouldn't be your identity, this, I believe, serves only to divide a nation. I'm not saying that people shouldn't be religous - It's their own choice, they can do what they want - I just believe that a child should make their own choice when the time comes.

    By bringing a child up in a highly religous enviornment, you are creating a 'Them and us' scenario. This was very apparent in Northern Ireland during 'The troubles'; people would only associate with those of the same faith. Catholic and Protestant communities have to be seperated by 'Peace walls' in order to stop the two fighting.

    I think by raising a child to associate their identity with their religion, people are creating strong divides in communities. But that's only my opinion, and I'm sure people will disagree.
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    I'd like to see an Anarchist Child.
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    (Original post by Accalia)
    I'd like to see an Anarchist Child.
    I'd like to see one that isn't!

    Bloody kids.
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    I don't think labeling as in calling a child Glaswegian is the same as labelling a child a Muslim child or a Christian child or whatever! The difference is you can't choose where you were born but you can choose a religion and you can also choose not to be religious! I think a child should be educated on all religions and also why many people aren't religious! This should allow the child to be able to come to a decision themseleves when they are old enough. No child is born a Muslim, Jew or a Christian!!
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    Personally I don't think its the label that's the issue - parents with strong views will always be able to push them on their kids at least until they reach their teens. I was brought up as a catholic and rebelled big time at about 14 - I'm now 39 and would still never go back. I was threatened with being kicked out of my catholic school for my beliefs but thankfully I was only on the final warning when I left at 16, and went elsewhere. I have kids of my own now and wanted to allow my children to choose for themselves but it seems that the village primary, despite being non-denominational pushes christian religion with minimal reference to any other. Whilst I guess they can be labelled as attending a particular school because I can't get away from the uniform, however, I'd not describe them with any geographical label if I can help it...
    Personally I feel that labels are far more damaging when they relate to something you can't change eg. a disability and its what you believe for yourself that matters not what others see you as...
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    (Original post by Maxy-Q.O.S)
    I don't think labeling as in calling a child Glaswegian is the same as labelling a child a Muslim child or a Christian child or whatever! The difference is you can't choose where you were born but you can choose a religion and you can also choose not to be religious! I think a child should be educated on all religions and also why many people aren't religious! This should allow the child to be able to come to a decision themseleves when they are old enough. No child is born a Muslim, Jew or a Christian!!
    Is that all the thousands of religions over time immemorial or just the ones with over say, 25,000 subscribers?
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    (Original post by Becky Stothart)
    Personally I don't think its the label that's the issue - parents with strong views will always be able to push them on their kids at least until they reach their teens. I was brought up as a catholic and rebelled big time at about 14 - I'm now 39 and would still never go back. I was threatened with being kicked out of my catholic school for my beliefs but thankfully I was only on the final warning when I left at 16, and went elsewhere. I have kids of my own now and wanted to allow my children to choose for themselves but it seems that the village primary, despite being non-denominational pushes christian religion with minimal reference to any other. Whilst I guess they can be labelled as attending a particular school because I can't get away from the uniform, however, I'd not describe them with any geographical label if I can help it...
    Personally I feel that labels are far more damaging when they relate to something you can't change eg. a disability and its what you believe for yourself that matters not what others see you as...
    I can't + Rep this until midnight, but what a fantastic attitude.
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    I agree with that campaign completely. I've no issue with parents educating their children about their own religion ONCE the child is already old enough to make up their own mind and look to other sources for opposing discussion, but not at a younger age.

    I personally was Christened not long after birth. I then became atheist at seven years old, and consequently became annoyed at the fact that I'd been given a label of Christianity without consent.

    Obviously, my Christening is really no big deal. It doesn't change me, and it doesn't change my beliefs, but there'll always be that feeling there that it's disrespectful in the same way that I'd never have a church wedding.
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    I really like the campaign, but I would since I'm a paid-up member of the BHA.

    I think that all children have the right to be born free of being stamped with the religious viewpoints of their parents - the only laws they should be brought up to uphold are those of the state. I don't hate my parents for having me christened a Catholic, but I wish that children born in the future would be free of religious intervention until they are mature enough to make up their own mind. Of course - being labelled doesn't stop us from making up our own minds on what religion we want to follow, if any - many atheists are descended from Christian families, as I am - but I think it's only fair to offer children an environment where they are encouraged to think for themselves, rather than have the thinking done for them. If/when I have kids, I have every intention of letting them make up their own mind about what religious path, if any, they want to follow. I may be a secular humanist, but I won't force my viewpoints on my children.

    I also think that other forms of labelling by others based on uncontrollable factors or external appearances - i.e. the divisions of ethnicities, races, nationalities - are fundamentally wrong. We should be free to label ourselves to whatever extent we deem suitable, with whatever labels we like. Arbitrary labels such as these have divided humanity along political power lines for generations. It's time we grew up.
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    Interestingly, the children used in that advert evangelical christians. I wonder why they look so happy, just saying you know......
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    (Original post by Maxy-Q.O.S)
    I don't think labeling as in calling a child Glaswegian is the same as labelling a child a Muslim child or a Christian child or whatever! The difference is you can't choose where you were born but you can choose a religion and you can also choose not to be religious! I think a child should be educated on all religions and also why many people aren't religious! This should allow the child to be able to come to a decision themseleves when they are old enough. No child is born a Muslim, Jew or a Christian!!
    I agree that children shouldn't be forced to be religious. When you get to a certain age, you're old enough to think for yourself and make up your own mind. Like I said, I don't really believe in God now, but I still identify as Jewish and I'm glad my parents brought me up the way they did.

    What I'm trying to say though, is that labels can be good as well as bad; they give you a sense of community and belonging, and help you to identify with your family's cultural background. I also think religion can be good for children. It's nice for kids to have a belief in God, and these days it's pretty hard to brainwash someone and prevent them from choosing their own beliefs once they grow up, with all the media available and the RE we get at school.
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    (Original post by AshMcD)
    Is that all the thousands of religions over time immemorial or just the ones with over say, 25,000 subscribers?
    as many as you can get through lol!

    No just the ones that are relevant today as in the religions which are the basis for cultural values which tend to be the ones with the most subscribers anyway!
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    oi! leave my signature alone!
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    (Original post by moregano)
    I agree that children shouldn't be forced to be religious. When you get to a certain age, you're old enough to think for yourself and make up your own mind. Like I said, I don't really believe in God now, but I still identify as Jewish and I'm glad my parents brought me up the way they did.

    What I'm trying to say though, is that labels can be good as well as bad; they give you a sense of community and belonging, and help you to identify with your family's cultural background. I also think religion can be good for children. It's nice for kids to have a belief in God, and these days it's pretty hard to brainwash someone and prevent them from choosing their own beliefs once they grow up, with all the media available and the RE we get at school.
    Well I see a fundamental issue in that as so far as I'm concerned children shouldn't be forced to do anything. Of course that's a complicated argument since you could argue sending a child to bed when they don't want to go is forcing them, but in terms of personal believes that should be decided on at adulthood, in that respect.

    And religion can be just as bad for children as good.
 
 
 
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