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What do you think about this ad campaign? watch

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    (Original post by moregano)
    I agree that children shouldn't be forced to be religious. When you get to a certain age, you're old enough to think for yourself and make up your own mind. Like I said, I don't really believe in God now, but I still identify as Jewish and I'm glad my parents brought me up the way they did.

    What I'm trying to say though, is that labels can be good as well as bad; they give you a sense of community and belonging, and help you to identify with your family's cultural background. I also think religion can be good for children. It's nice for kids to have a belief in God, and these days it's pretty hard to brainwash someone and prevent them from choosing their own beliefs once they grow up, with all the media available and the RE we get at school.
    I agree with you in some ways. There are alot of good things associated with religion but I think these values can exist in a person without religion also. I also think that studying your family's religion is good enough to identify with your family's cultural background if the child wishes to do so. I don't think they necessarily need to belong to this religion to understand the cultural background of the family. I think it's more important to suggest to children that they have a choice of whether they want to believe in god aswell and to also inform them that there is no scientific evidence that supports the existence of a god. It would be nice for everyone if there was a loving god but it's better to have a child who can learn how to think clearly and logically!
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    (Original post by Lust of a Gardener)
    I think it's a great idea!

    Your religous beliefs shouldn't be your identity, this, I believe, serves only to divide a nation. I'm not saying that people shouldn't be religous - It's their own choice, they can do what they want - I just believe that a child should make their own choice when the time comes.

    By bringing a child up in a highly religous enviornment, you are creating a 'Them and us' scenario. This was very apparent in Northern Ireland during 'The troubles'; people would only associate with those of the same faith. Catholic and Protestant communities have to be seperated by 'Peace walls' in order to stop the two fighting.

    I think by raising a child to associate their identity with their religion, people are creating strong divides in communities. But that's only my opinion, and I'm sure people will disagree.
    Religious beliefs, or lack thereof, are very closely tied to identity. I am Catholic; not a "them and us" Catholic, but someone who was brought up with very clear ideas about morality and theology. I haven't mindlessly assimilated into Catholicism, but my religious background is irreversibly imprinted on my psyche (regardless of whether or not I profess to continue such beliefs).

    Also, I think it's pretty hard to differentiate between a normal religious environment and an "extremely religious environment" as you describe it. Perhaps impossibly so.
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    (Original post by AshMcD)
    Well I see a fundamental issue in that as so far as I'm concerned children shouldn't be forced to do anything. Of course that's a complicated argument since you could argue sending a child to bed when they don't want to go is forcing them, but in terms of personal believes that should be decided on at adulthood, in that respect.

    And religion can be just as bad for children as good.
    Beliefs can't be forced on anyone, there's no way of forcing someone to think something. Children can be forced to go to church or whatever, but they can't be forced to believe what they're told there, and lots don't. But at least they're being given the option to believe.

    I guess I'm talking about the cultural side of it more than the actual belief in religion anyway. I can understand what you're getting at though, and I do think that parents should always make an effort to teach their children about other religions and cultures as well as their own.
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    Good campaign I guess, but why is there always this need for having people jumping up in the air in the picture.
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    Pssh, it's a bit daft. It won't appeal to the crazy fundamentalists who are the people you don't want influencing others (especially their own children for obvious reasons) and it's just a bit patronising for those bought up in a religious family who still have more than enough vision to make their own choice.
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    (Original post by moregano)
    Beliefs can't be forced on anyone, there's no way of forcing someone to think something. Children can be forced to go to church or whatever, but they can't be forced to believe what they're told there, and lots don't. But at least they're being given the option to believe.

    I guess I'm talking about the cultural side of it more than the actual belief in religion anyway. I can understand what you're getting at though, and I do think that parents should always make an effort to teach their children about other religions and cultures as well as their own.
    Do you honestrly really believe that?

    I know that sounds snappy but I mean it genuinely.

    It's definitely possible to force people to think something. Do you think free will would lead to suicide bombings or any other of the list of endlessly stupid things done in the name of religion?

    I see what you'resaying about the cultural side, but it offers nothing that can't be gained from a stable, loving family environment so far as I'm concerned.
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    I love how very few people actually understand why babies are christened.

    I happen to disagree with the ad, not because of its message, which I do agree with, but because it's misinformed and shows a lack of understanding about most religions. That and it assumes that atheism should be the default position, which is, again, wrong and shows a lack of understanding about their own beliefs.
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    (Original post by innerhollow)
    Personally I think parents should be allowed to bring up their kids in a religious habitat if they desire. I mean, you can accuse parents of indoctrinating children with religion, but conversely you could also say that raising children in a completely non-religious environment is also indoctrination.
    No, it isn't.

    You can educate the child, but not to label as anything until he/she decides.
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    The difference between calling a child a Christian and calling a child British is that the child is British, but they can't be expected to know their religious beliefs at that age, so they can't really be called Christians without making the assumption that a child should automatically agree with their parents, which is wrong.

    (Original post by Hylean)
    That and it assumes that atheism should be the default position, which is, again, wrong and shows a lack of understanding about their own beliefs.
    Where does it assume that? "Atheist" is included in the list of words in the background which it implies it'd be wrong to label a child with.
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    If I am religious at the time I have children, I will be bringing them up in the religion I believe in. They will know the basics of other religions, and understand that others aren't religious at all. When they get to the age that I'm allowing them to do what they like with regards to other things, then they can choose. In exactly the same way, they will be brought up as Gooners.

    It's silly to think religious people who really believe would not bring their child up in their belief, especially those who believe in the afterlife.
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    (Original post by moregano)
    Beliefs can't be forced on anyone, there's no way of forcing someone to think something. Children can be forced to go to church or whatever, but they can't be forced to believe what they're told there, and lots don't. But at least they're being given the option to believe.

    I guess I'm talking about the cultural side of it more than the actual belief in religion anyway. I can understand what you're getting at though, and I do think that parents should always make an effort to teach their children about other religions and cultures as well as their own.
    Of course they can!

    A little child who is being told everyday that a God will send him to hell to burn for ever, if he does anything 'bad' and that this God can watch 24/7 everywhere.

    We are talking about children here.
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    I think it would be interesting to see what would happen to the major religions if children under 16 were only taught about them in an objective manner. I honestly can't believe that the numbers of followers would maintain themselves without kids being taught that such and such God is real.

    Don't really care either way, I think religion is a load of ******** but if it can help some people then fine, it's just idiot extremists that need to be dealt with, not your average church goer.
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    (Original post by Lord Hysteria)
    No, it isn't.

    You can educate the child, but not to label as anything until he/she decides.
    I think as soon as they ask you what God you believe in and you say you don't believe in any, it'd be very difficult for a child to have faith on his/her own or enter an establishment that would help them understand their religion.
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    (Original post by adamrules247)
    Interestingly, the children used in that advert evangelical christians. I wonder why they look so happy, just saying you know......
    ... because there is a guy saying "cheese" with a big camera! and they might get a sweetie from their mummy ....
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    (Original post by EskimoJo)
    I think as soon as they ask you what God you believe in and you say you don't believe in any, it'd be very difficult for a child to have faith on his/her own or enter an establishment that would help them understand their religion.
    He is a child, he is not supposed to have faith. :confused:

    He is supposed to go and play in the park, as opposed to engage in theological discourse.
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    (Original post by nolongerhearthemusic)
    Where does it assume that? "Atheist" is included in the list of words in the background which it implies it'd be wrong to label a child with.
    The clue is in the urls which show who sponsored the ad.
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    (Original post by AshMcD)
    Do you honestrly really believe that?

    I know that sounds snappy but I mean it genuinely.

    It's definitely possible to force people to think something. Do you think free will would lead to suicide bombings or any other of the list of endlessly stupid things done in the name of religion?

    I see what you'resaying about the cultural side, but it offers nothing that can't be gained from a stable, loving family environment so far as I'm concerned.
    (Original post by Lord Hysteria)
    Of course they can!

    A little child who is being told everyday that a God will send him to hell to burn for ever, if he does anything 'bad' and that this God can watch 24/7 everywhere.

    We are talking about children here.
    Yeah. I get your point. Now I think about it, it is pretty terrible to convince a child that they're going to burn in hell if they do anything "wrong". I guess it's all about common sense - responsible parents wouldn't use religion as a scare tactic, and they would allow their child to opt out of religion or choose their own path if they wanted to. Maybe I'm being too optimistic.
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    (Original post by Hylean)
    The clue is in the urls which show who sponsored the ad.
    How does that imply what you said it implies?
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    (Original post by Lord Hysteria)
    No, it isn't.
    Why not? By raising them in an environment where they are not exposed to any religions, you are essentially subscribing them to atheism.

    Read the quote below. Even the guys who made the poster said atheism can be indoctrinated.

    (Original post by nolongerhearthemusic)
    Where does it assume that? "Atheist" is included in the list of words in the background which it implies it'd be wrong to label a child with.
    ((Thanks for sharing that with us. That's actually really surprising and really cool. I have newfound respect for the designers of that poster))


    You can educate the child, but not to label as anything until he/she decides.
    What do you mean you "can" educate the child. I think you MUST educate the child. Anyone who is wary of religious indoctrination should be gagging to supply children with a well-balanced religious education program.

    And you really think the labelling does anything? To this day my parents will still identify me as a member of their religion if asked, and it doesn't stop me, or anyone with a religious upbringing, from denouncing religious beliefs. You wanna know why? Because we were all well-educated. Education is top priority.
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    Waste of money; it won't change anyone's views, it'll just confirm their prejudices.

    Moreover, I'm really glad I was raised in a Catholic environment, it hasn't stopped me relabelling myself as I've got older. I don't see anything wrong with labels as long as no one gets stuck under one.
 
 
 
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