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What do people think about the burqa? watch

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    I don't want to start a vicious debate or heated argument, I simply want to know what people think.

    I got interested after reading this:

    http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2010...lic-veil-women

    I'm not sure what I think, I'm very supportive of tolerance and multi-culturalism and love diversity but I can't help seeing it as a symbol of male oppression...why is it respectable for men to show their hair and faces?

    Where are the origins of the burqa, is it explicitly in the Qur'an or is it just patriarchal control?

    I particularly want to hear to the views of people who where any sort of covering for religious reasons
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    I think the burqa is more of a cultrual thing, rooted in the middle east. Im pretty sure it is NOT a requirement to wear one. I'm personally against it if the woman isnt choosing to wear it by choice - i.e. being forced.
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    To be perfectly honest I am not too keen on them being worn, its just my opinion. I think its a little unjust that it is seen as their right to wear them in Britain and be unjudged for it; yet I am pretty sure that if British people go to the middle east in skirts and t shirts, or even jeans, they would be seen by many as sluts and expected to adopt traditional eastern dress.

    I dont want to come across as racist, but I really dont get the double standards of political correctness at all.....
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    Calm down a muslim is at hand.

    Actually a Burqa is a compulsory requirement for a muslim woman.
    But It should be embraced not forced upon a woman.
    You could argue that listening to music is just as bad as not wearing a burqa for a women.

    Actually if you believe the burqa is a symbol of male oppresion you are wrong and a victim of the twisted media.
    It is a symbol of woman as being more that a sexual object it shows men that she is not longing their attention and shouldnt be seen to. A burqa actually allows a women to be free from being viewed as a sexual toy. And thats why it is compulsory.
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    If someone wants to wear it off their own accord to uphold their religious beliefs, I would consider it a crime against humanity to deny them that right. If someone is forced to wear it against their will, again, I would consider it a crime against humanity. The most overlooked factor when discussing the burqa/hijab is that contrary to popular belief, most women actually chose to wear it. Very few are actually forced to wear it.
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    (Original post by Akbar2k7)
    Calm down a muslim is at hand.

    Actually a Burqa is a compulsory requirement for a muslim woman.
    But It should be embraced not forced upon a woman.
    You could argue that listening to music is just as bad as not wearing a burqa for a women.

    Actually if you believe the burqa is a symbol of male oppresion you are wrong and a victim of the twisted media.
    It is a symbol of woman as being more that a sexual object it shows men that she is not longing their attention and shouldnt be seen to. A burqa actually allows a women to be free from being viewed as a sexual toy. And thats why it is compulsory.
    I thought it was just the Hijab that was compulsory, not the full burqa?
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    (Original post by Akbar2k7)
    Calm down a muslim is at hand.

    Actually a Burqa is a compulsory requirement for a muslim woman.
    But It should be embraced not forced upon a woman.
    You could argue that listening to music is just as bad as not wearing a burqa for a women.

    Actually if you believe the burqa is a symbol of male oppresion you are wrong and a victim of the twisted media.
    It is a symbol of woman as being more that a sexual object it shows men that she is not longing their attention and shouldnt be seen to. A burqa actually allows a women to be free from being viewed as a sexual toy. And thats why it is compulsory.
    I'm not so sure about this, source? From what I know the Qur'an does not specify exact items of clothing but is more focused on modesty- it's up to you to decide how to interpret modest.

    In answer to OP's question, I think it's up to the woman. I don't see it as a symbol of oppresion.
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    they give me the horn.
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    (Original post by HumanNature1992)
    I thought it was just the Hijab that was compulsory, not the full burqa?
    There is a difference of opinion amongst the scholars. Some say it's compulsory and others say it's only recommended. No scholar says it not part of Islam.
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    (Original post by derf1)
    I don't want to start a vicious debate or heated argument, I simply want to know what people think.

    I got interested after reading this:

    http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2010...lic-veil-women

    I'm not sure what I think, I'm very supportive of tolerance and multi-culturalism and love diversity but I can't help seeing it as a symbol of male oppression...why is it respectable for men to show their hair and faces?

    Where are the origins of the burqa, is it explicitly in the Qur'an or is it just patriarchal control?

    I particularly want to hear to the views of people who where any sort of covering for religious reasons
    Not a sign of such a word in Quran.It only speaks of hijab of both sexes.
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    (Original post by JellyBean123)
    To be perfectly honest I am not too keen on them being worn, its just my opinion. I think its a little unjust that it is seen as their right to wear them in Britain and be unjudged for it; yet I am pretty sure that if British people go to the middle east in skirts and t shirts, or even jeans, they would be seen by many as sluts and expected to adopt traditional eastern dress.

    I dont want to come across as racist, but I really dont get the double standards of political correctness at all.....
    LOl i assure you on the "inside" middle east aint no different, as i belong from one.:yep:
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    I think it's a vile instrument of misogynistic oppression. Also:

    http://www.independent.co.uk/opinion...s-1877884.html
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    Actually Let me elaborate the burqa itself is not compulsory but making sure clothing in no way allows the shape of the body to be seen is.

    Islamic Groundrules
    1. Islam is a choice no one can force you to comply only encourage you to.
    2. any1 who forces it does not understand the religeon.
    3. Islam teaches about peace unless you are threatened any even then political means are more favourable then violence
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    Oh yea i clocked the veil no thats not compulsory
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    From the perspective of freedom,I have no problem with anyone wearing anything or saying anything,however what the Burqua symbolises for me is why I am against it.
    It is the symbol of patriarchal dominance,the submission of women into a backdated society,one which should be actively campaigned against,as is still present,even in the western world,and for that I am against it.
    Though if any female Muslim feels it is a symbol of her faith so thats fair enough. I just wouldn't want the banning of the Burqua to set a precedent,which could be one slippery slope.
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    (Original post by *Freddy*)
    It's just silly, i really dislike it. I'm a Muslim, and no it's not part of Islam, in fact even the hijab (only covers head) isn't a MAJOR requirement, there are more important priciples like faith from the heart, prayer, zakat (charity), hajj (pilgrimage), fasting - the five pillars. So often, some, (note: some) Islamic communities place too much emphasis on appearances and not much else. Pity really.

    Anyway, it's not a requirement by religion, and it's just not practical in any soceity, let alone the west. At the same time, a complete ban is just a bit too invasive of freedom of dress.
    By the way cuzz a hijab iz a MAJOR requirement as it is Haram for a woman not to wear one. Music Porn Gambling are Haram too. But i agree with you faith comes first
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    (Original post by derf1)
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    For me personally it doesn't belong in western civilisation. Like you said, it degrades women and it disguises identity. My personal opinion is that it should be banned in this country.
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    (Original post by Akbar2k7)
    Calm down a muslim is at hand.

    Actually a Burqa is a compulsory requirement for a muslim woman.
    But It should be embraced not forced upon a woman.
    You could argue that listening to music is just as bad as not wearing a burqa for a women.

    Actually if you believe the burqa is a symbol of male oppresion you are wrong and a victim of the twisted media.
    It is a symbol of woman as being more that a sexual object it shows men that she is not longing their attention and shouldnt be seen to. A burqa actually allows a women to be free from being viewed as a sexual toy. And thats why it is compulsory.
    Isn't it just based on the interpretations of different Islamic Scholars?
    It depends on how strict the view is
    I agree that believing it's a symbol of oppression shows the extreme manipulation of media, i mean why do we need to believe the news its just another load of ppl talking on tv, thwy can say anything they want

    I don't see the problem with women trying to be more modest, I get that they should reveal their faces when necessary, but apart from that whats wrong with it?
    Isn't the society today all about free will; so why are we not allowed to wear what we want
    In my point of view banning the niquaab is a form of opression itself

    gosh, I hav this arguement with my dad like every day
    just had it now :]
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    (Original post by Krakatoa)
    From the perspective of freedom,I have no problem with anyone wearing anything or saying anything,however what the Burqua symbolises for me is why I am against it.
    It is the symbol of patriarchal dominance,the submission of women into a backdated society,one which should be actively campaigned against,as is still present,even in the western world,and for that I am against it.
    Though if any female Muslim feels it is a symbol of her faith so thats fair enough. I just wouldn't want the banning of the Burqua to set a precedent,which could be one slippery slope.
    Dude it is nott as i reapeat a symbol of patriachal dominence in fact it makes men see wemon as more than sexual toys.
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    (Original post by xxhijabixx)
    Isn't it just based on the interpretations of different Islamic Scholars?
    It depends on how strict the view is
    I agree that believing it's a symbol of oppression shows the extreme manipulation of media, i mean why do we need to believe the news its just another load of ppl talking on tv, thwy can say anything they want

    I don't see the problem with women trying to be more modest, I get that they should reveal their faces when necessary, but apart from that whats wrong with it?
    Isn't the society today all about free will; so why are we not allowed to wear what we want
    In my point of view banning the niquaab is a form of opression itself

    gosh, I hav this arguement with my dad like every day
    just had it now :]
    I agree and by the way i was confused i know the veil is not cumpulsory
 
 
 
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