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    Hi,

    I am thinking of continuing my education and following a postgraduate course at King's College. I haven't decided yet which course I would like to choose but my biggest concern is how to combine my full-time work with studies. From what I read on the website the postgraduate courses are 1 year FT and 2 years PT but there is no information on a few things that I find important.

    - What is the difference between full-time and part-time studies? Are there afternoon or weekend classes available?
    - How many days a week are the classes? (More or less)
    - Is the attendance crucial? I am sure I would have some difficulties coming to every class since I work full time.
    - Are the any flexible arrangements possible for people who work?

    I would be grateful for information to the above questions.
    Thank you in advance,

    O.
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    Can only comment on experience but my PG Dip that i did we had some Part timer's on there. My course ran in 3 week blocks with 1 week full of lectures and the other 2 weeks free. This type of timetable is used to cater for professionals especially. The part timer's did 1 in 2 modules so did had lectures 1 in 6 weeks rather than 1 in 3.
    I guess with each uni they will do it differently so contact them to ask cos each uni may be different to the next.
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    (Original post by sayahola)

    - What is the difference between full-time and part-time studies? Are there afternoon or weekend classes available?
    - How many days a week are the classes? (More or less)
    - Is the attendance crucial? I am sure I would have some difficulties coming to every class since I work full time.
    - Are the any flexible arrangements possible for people who work?
    Hi,
    I'm doing a P/T MA at UEL, and i work full-time. I've just gone into semester B of the first year of the MA (2 YRS when studying P/T)

    - Part-time studies means that you double the time you have to complete all your work. If was was full-time, I'd have two modules a semester, but as I'm studying P/T, i only have one module a semester (but it will get a bit for complicated in year 2 semester B when i have to include a thesis/project as well). I have one class a week, it starts at 5 PM on a wednesday, which means that i leave work a little early to make it.

    - My classes are one day a week at the mo, but when i start working on my thesis in 8-10 months time, that may increase to two.

    - Attendance is as important as it was for undergrad. UEL operate a rule of minimum 75% attendance at both undergrad and postgrad (even for part-time options), however, extenuating circumstances amy be taken into account, but this does not include not being able to get time off of work (you will be expected to organise that before starting your postgrad).

    - As regard flexible arrangements - talk to the admisions people, and when you've decided what you want to study, try to talk directly to the lecturer that will be leading the course, ultimately it will be s/he who works out how flexible they can/cant be
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    I don't know what subject area you're studying, but it might be worth looking at Birkbeck: you can study there full- or part-time and classes take place in the evenings.
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    Speaking from experience, it's do-able. Especially if your classes are at night rather than in the morning (like what is common in undergrad degrees). But I wouldn't recommend studying part-time and working full-time. Awful experience. I'd probably go: study part-time, work part-time, or just study full-time (and work on a casual basis, under 8 hours per week and less during exams).

    I did a postgraduate certificate in library and information management, just graduated.

    My first degree was a bachelor of arts in biology x
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    One of my friends dropped out of a part time post graduate because he found himself in the uni every day to do university work. So I would make a big effort to check hours suggested to complete the course well - it may be less part time then you think - or you may just struggle with the material and naturally require more time.
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    P/T postgrad study and F/T work is do-able, its a lot of hard work, but certainly do-able.

    You will have to resign yourself to losing most of your down-time, but if you enjoy the subject that you are studying, that will make it easier.
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    I just have a quick question that I've been curious about since hearing that you can do a postgrad course part-time- do you pay the same amount of money for it? So say there's an MA that costs £5000, would it still be £5000 split over the two year period, or do you have to pay more because you're taking longer?
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    (Original post by llacerta)
    I just have a quick question that I've been curious about since hearing that you can do a postgrad course part-time- do you pay the same amount of money for it? So say there's an MA that costs £5000, would it still be £5000 split over the two year period, or do you have to pay more because you're taking longer?
    Just going from the situation at York, which is all I know about without researching:

    For almost all courses, part-time students' fees are the same as those paid by full-time students, but split over two years (so £2,500p/a in your example).

    But there are other courses -- those that are more specialised and/or competitive -- which have "non-standard" fees. Some of those involve PT students paying more in total.

    As you asked specifically about MAs, though, I believe you'll find that part-time students pay the same as full-time students.
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    (Original post by llacerta)
    I just have a quick question that I've been curious about since hearing that you can do a postgrad course part-time- do you pay the same amount of money for it? So say there's an MA that costs £5000, would it still be £5000 split over the two year period, or do you have to pay more because you're taking longer?
    Ditto B&C, my fees of 4,800 are split into three (the split is a bit curious) - 1,600 by the end of semester A in first year (p/t MA), the same in second year, and then, because the MA thesis deadline is not until september in 2nd year, i think that the last installment is paid at some point that summer.

    Still paying the same amount, but its far more manageable (particularly if you have a decent wage during the course of you p/t postgrad) - but double chekc with your uni about your course.
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    (Original post by Bread and Circlejerks)
    Just going from the situation at York, which is all I know about without researching:

    For almost all courses, part-time students' fees are the same as those paid by full-time students, but split over two years (so £2,500p/a in your example).

    But there are other courses -- those that are more specialised and/or competitive -- which have "non-standard" fees. Some of those involve PT students paying more in total.

    As you asked specifically about MAs, though, I believe you'll find that part-time students pay the same as full-time students.
    Ah, okay, I see. Well, I only used an MA as an example off the top of my head, but as I'll be studying for a BSc I guess it'd be more likely that I'd go onto an MSc perhaps.

    Okay, thanks for the help!
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    (Original post by llacerta)
    Ah, okay, I see. Well, I only used an MA as an example off the top of my head, but as I'll be studying for a BSc I guess it'd be more likely that I'd go onto an MSc perhaps.

    Okay, thanks for the help!
    I presume that the MSc is likely to work in much the same way - we can give you some advice and tips on here - but I'd suggest that when you are certain that you want to study a postgrad, call up the uni to make sure you have the right info
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    (Original post by darigan)
    I presume that the MSc is likely to work in much the same way - we can give you some advice and tips on here - but I'd suggest that when you are certain that you want to study a postgrad, call up the uni to make sure you have the right info
    Okay, that's a very good idea, thanks for the help!
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    (Original post by sayahola)
    Hi,

    I am thinking of continuing my education and following a postgraduate course at King's College. I haven't decided yet which course I would like to choose but my biggest concern is how to combine my full-time work with studies. From what I read on the website the postgraduate courses are 1 year FT and 2 years PT but there is no information on a few things that I find important.

    - What is the difference between full-time and part-time studies? Are there afternoon or weekend classes available?
    - How many days a week are the classes? (More or less)
    - Is the attendance crucial? I am sure I would have some difficulties coming to every class since I work full time.
    - Are the any flexible arrangements possible for people who work?

    I would be grateful for information to the above questions.
    Thank you in advance,

    O.
    I only have a few experiences with part time students who attended the same modules I did (but did half the number each year) so 6 modules were spread over 2 years, instead of one for the MA. So they were on campus/in classes during the day. They did have different assignment due dates though.

    If you're looking at London, have you looked at Birkbeck purely because it's AIMED at students who want to study part time in the evening whilst working full time.
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    I started off my MA as a part-time student. I had to do two modules per semester, instead of four, and was going to pay my fees (about £4000 at Manchester) over the two years instead.

    However, I found it almost impossible to fit work (only part time, as well) and university in with one another (although, in all fairness, I had other complicating factors too). If you live far out from the university in question, you have to allow a lot of time for travel (for me, more than an hour a day, and for others on my course, too), and the pressure at deadline time is almost the same - if I hadn't switched to full-time (having given up my job and moved home, to my wonderful parents), I would have been writing almost the same number of words at the end of the semester as I did on the full-time course.

    Lecture attendance is compulsory, and they aren't too understanding about absence, in my experience.

    Have you thought about the Open University? It's just as good (one of my lecturers is an OU alumnus) and lets you take three years to do your Masters - it's about a day's work a week, as long as you don't mind losing Saturdays...
 
 
 
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