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    Personal preference. Doubt cuffs are a tad smarter, so probably preferred if you're in a job where dress really matters and have bespoke suits (eg. IBD and sales) but no-one will care too much either way. Or if they do they're being snobby for no reason.
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    I need someone to rep me (up or down is cool) because hovering over my rep currently says "Nimiza is just really nice."

    This is a filthy lie.

    Will return the favour if you leave your name in the rep field.
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    A bit of a random question. I know it's not going to be tailored, and they're just trading off their name, but what are The Savile Row Company like for general off-the-shelf clothing?

    EDIT: The reason I ask is they have a sale on.
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    Would this suit be any good?

    http://www.savilerowco.com/products/...pid-msuit24gry
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    (Original post by LoZEr)
    Would this suit be any good?

    http://www.savilerowco.com/products/...pid-msuit24gry
    That is cheap rubbish.
    Try this:
    http://www.henrypoole.com/bespoke_ta...poke_suits.cns
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    (Original post by LoZEr)
    Would this suit be any good?

    http://www.savilerowco.com/products/...pid-msuit24gry
    (Original post by .ACS.)
    A bit of a random question. I know it's not going to be tailored, and they're just trading off their name, but what are The Savile Row Company like for general off-the-shelf clothing?

    EDIT: The reason I ask is they have a sale on.
    I've heard not particulary great stuff, though I haven't tried any of theirs. They usually have a sale, a bit like TM Lewin, as well. I'd imagine you can get slightly better for similar money, but I doubt they'll be that horrendous for £200.

    (Original post by flugestuge)
    That is cheap rubbish.
    Try this:
    http://www.henrypoole.com/bespoke_ta...poke_suits.cns
    While admittedly a good place to go, responding to someone asking about £200 with a recommendation for a £3000 suit is unlikely to be too helpful
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    (Original post by flugestuge)
    That is cheap rubbish.
    Try this:
    http://www.henrypoole.com/bespoke_ta...poke_suits.cns
    To be honest, if one is spending £3000 on a suit, there are MUCH better tailors out there in my opinion - using finer layered threads and having more bespoke jacket features etc.
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    (Original post by manchild007)
    To be honest, if one is spending £3000 on a suit, there are MUCH better tailors out there in my opinion - using finer layered threads and having more bespoke jacket features etc.
    You mean better tailors on Savile Row? Like Huntsman?
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    (Original post by MaxMaxMax)
    You mean better tailors on Savile Row? Like Huntsman?
    I'd hope not, Huntsman has reportedly gone downhill a lot since they were bought by an American firm and lost most of their best tailors to Richard Anderson. Though I haven't heard bad things about Poole, but it's not my style anyway so I've never really read much about them.
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    (Original post by Drogue)
    I'd hope not, Huntsman has reportedly gone downhill a lot since they were bought by an American firm and lost most of their best tailors to Richard Anderson. Though I haven't heard bad things about Poole, but it's not my style anyway so I've never really read much about them.
    How did you hear about them losing tailors to Richard Anderson? Also what is Henry Poole's style? Surely a Savile row suit is a Savile Row suit isn't it? Are there any websites you could link me to that detail the differences between the Savile Row tailors?
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    (Original post by MaxMaxMax)
    How did you hear about them losing tailors to Richard Anderson?
    Forums and friends. Richard Anderson is an ex-Huntsman tailor who left when they were bought out. Gradually rumours got out about some short cuts at Huntsman and of some of their better, prouder tailors leaving to join RA.

    (Original post by MaxMaxMax)
    Also what is Henry Poole's style? Surely a Savile row suit is a Savile Row suit isn't it?
    No, not at all!

    (Original post by MaxMaxMax)
    Are there any websites you could link me to that detail the differences between the Savile Row tailors?
    You could have a look around Ask Andy About Clothes and StyleForum, which are pretty good sites, or Google for reviews and such. But to give a brief idea, you have two main camps:

    'Harder' tailors, often with a military pedigree, who build suits with structure. They use a reasonable amount of padding to turn your body shape into a stronger shape. Typical examples of this are Huntsman, Henry Poole and Richard Anderson.

    'Softer' tailors who use less padding and make less structured suits. The aim here is what's called 'drape', which is how the suit moves with you and hangs off you. Anderson & Sheppard, who made Cary Grant's and Prince Charles' suits, are the flagbearer for this on Savile Row, famous for their high arm holes - these mean you can move more without the back riding up but some peopl find the feeling a little restrictive, as it's closer fitting around the shoulder. Soft tailoring is a difficult way to make a suit, less forgiving for slight mistakes or changes in body shape, so this can be a more risky option. Though having said that a good tailor won't let you leave with a bad suit. The epitome of this is Rubinacci, the famous Napoli tailor with premises in London. A little more expensive than Savile Row, but with incredibly fine stitching and a great reputation.

    You also get those that are somewhere in the middle and will mold more to the style you want, like Gieves & Hawkes, and those younger tailors who tend to be of the slightly-soft style, but will also mold to your style, like Steed or Thomas Mahon (see English Cut, Thomas Mahon's blog, for some great notes on tailoring). For a younger guy, I'd go to one of the latter two, not least because they start at around £1900 rather than the £2500-3k most others start at. Though if you want a really soft style or a harder, more structured suit, the more traditional firms could be worth it.

    This is all picked up from reading reviews, blogs and forums, and talking to people, as I doubt anyone's tried suits from all of these. But there seems to be a consensus among many different sources that amount to the above.

    As an aside, George, who does my suits, tends to do a relatively structured style, though he'll adapt it to what you want. Personally I have mine pretty firmly waisted with just below middle-of-the-road padding, to give me some shape but still have a suit that molds to me. I'll be going for higher armholes in the future for extra ease of movement, as I'm getting more used to the feel of a bespoke suit (which is quite different) and fancy having a better range of movement. Being able to raise your arms without the suit coming off your collar or riding up at the back is one of the things that shows a bespoke suit IMHO. I'm tempted to try Steed or Mahon next time I get some spare money to see if there's a noticeable difference that's worth more than doubling the price, but I'm very happy with George so that can wait for a bit!
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    I'm thinking about investing in an umbrella. Something which is large enough to ensure I don't get wet, but small enough to not deserve its own seat on the tube. Not looking to spend more than necessary, but would ideally like something I'll still have in 5 years time. Any recommendations?
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    (Original post by hiiiiiigh123)
    I'm thinking about investing in an umbrella. Something which is large enough to ensure I don't get wet, but small enough to not deserve its own seat on the tube. Not looking to spend more than necessary, but would ideally like something I'll still have in 5 years time. Any recommendations?

    this whole thread is unbelievably funny. i'm actually not sure if its supposed to be tongue-in-cheek or not.

    i'm hoping its a joke. it is a joke, isn't it?
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    (Original post by Nimiza)
    Combination of the two, doesn't really matter. I've heard of analysts not wearing double cuffs for fear of getting ahead of themselves in terms of position, but I've seen no evidence of VPs/EDs thinking analysts with double cuffs as bigshot wannabes.
    ROFL.

    This thread just gets better and better. Is this the training ground for Charlie Brooker or something?

    All very amusing, thanks, I am going to keep scanning through.
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    Can I ask where you would place Norton & Sons in the Harder/Softer/Somewhere In the Middle camps.

    I ask as I went in to their shop the other week to purchase a new tie and was extremely tempted that when the bonus money started rolling, to go and invest in one of their suits...

    (Original post by Drogue)
    'Harder' tailors, often with a military pedigree, who build suits with structure. They use a reasonable amount of padding to turn your body shape into a stronger shape. Typical examples of this are Huntsman, Henry Poole and Richard Anderson.

    'Softer' tailors who use less padding and make less structured suits. The aim here is what's called 'drape', which is how the suit moves with you and hangs off you. Anderson & Sheppard, who made Cary Grant's and Prince Charles' suits, are the flagbearer for this on Savile Row, famous for their high arm holes - these mean you can move more without the back riding up but some peopl find the feeling a little restrictive, as it's closer fitting around the shoulder. Soft tailoring is a difficult way to make a suit, less forgiving for slight mistakes or changes in body shape, so this can be a more risky option. Though having said that a good tailor won't let you leave with a bad suit. The epitome of this is Rubinacci, the famous Napoli tailor with premises in London. A little more expensive than Savile Row, but with incredibly fine stitching and a great reputation.

    You also get those that are somewhere in the middle and will mold more to the style you want, like Gieves & Hawkes, and those younger tailors who tend to be of the slightly-soft style, but will also mold to your style, like Steed or Thomas Mahon (see English Cut, Thomas Mahon's blog, for some great notes on tailoring). For a younger guy, I'd go to one of the latter two, not least because they start at around £1900 rather than the £2500-3k most others start at. Though if you want a really soft style or a harder, more structured suit, the more traditional firms could be worth it.
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    (Original post by 5macbook4)
    Can I ask where you would place Norton & Sons in the Harder/Softer/Somewhere In the Middle camps.

    I ask as I went in to their shop the other week to purchase a new tie and was extremely tempted that when the bonus money started rolling, to go and invest in one of their suits...
    ...Erm, aren't you a fresher?
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    (Original post by BetterThanHeaven)
    ...Erm, aren't you a fresher?
    Yes but next year's relocation bonus isn't too far away!

    No but seriously as soon as I feel I can reasonably afford a suit from the Row I will be booking myself in for measurements. Whether than be next year or in three years time, there is no harm in getting a good idea of what exactly I want before I make the investment.
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    (Original post by hiiiiiigh123)
    I'm thinking about investing in an umbrella. Something which is large enough to ensure I don't get wet, but small enough to not deserve its own seat on the tube. Not looking to spend more than necessary, but would ideally like something I'll still have in 5 years time. Any recommendations?
    A bespoke umbrella from James Smith & Sons would be ideal.
    Expect to spend £250 - £280 per umbrella.

    "A gentleman must have at least four umbrellas.
    An umbrella is not just an implement for keeping the rain off one’s Savile Row pinstripe.
    Rather, it is a statement about one’s character and one’s attitude to life.
    Are you content with the cheap and nasty (Heaven forfend!), or do you demand high standards, expert craftsmanship and a proper measure of dignity?
    An umbrella can afford all these fine qualities – and impart something quintessentially English into the bargain.

    The frame should have 8 ribs, although 10 are sometimes provided for extra stability in wind.
    The normal measurement of the cover when rolled is 25 inches.
    For this size of cover allows a pleasing show of wood below the handle and above the terminating metal ferrule.
    But if the clouds look menacing, a 26½ inch cover (again, measuring rolled) will provide much more protection – at the expense of a little elegance.
    Thus the need for 2 umbrellas.

    Look into your wardrobe again, and glance down. There you will see your shoes – both black and brown.
    The classic English umbrella has a black cover (usually nowadays made of nylon, which is light and hard-wearing).
    But a black umbrella with brown shoes… banish such a sartorial solecism!
    You will therefore need 2 further umbrellas (a 25 inch and a 26½ inch) with covers in a discreet colour.
    Dark green is perfect.
    I suppose one could use a green dust sheath to conceal the black in the dry, but come a rainy day and the problem would reveal itself once more.

    Finally, two features which will make each umbrella truly yours – the bespoke element.
    First, the length of the stick. This should be cut to your exact requirement before the ferrule is added.
    And second, the silver band (hallmarked, of course). This is fitted on the lower part of the handle and should on no account be adorned with a maker’s name.
    It must be plain, so that upon it can be engraved your initials – especially useful to the waiters in those restaurants in which the differentiation of customers’ belongings carries a low priority.
    (Occasionally the band will be gold-plated, but to my mind this adds an unpleasant touch of vulgarity.)"
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    hai, im an intern. wuold i look good with this in the office? my friend says that MDs will laugh at me, it only costs $50k
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    (Original post by 5macbook4)
    Yes but next year's relocation bonus isn't too far away!

    No but seriously as soon as I feel I can reasonably afford a suit from the Row I will be booking myself in for measurements. Whether than be next year or in three years time, there is no harm in getting a good idea of what exactly I want before I make the investment.
    How very presumptuous and optimistic you are.
 
 
 
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