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    What's the difference between a 'finite' change and a 'differential' change, and do differential and infinitesimal changes mean the same thing?

    Thanks for your help.
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    What's the difference between a 'finite' change and a 'differential' change, and do differential and infinitesimal changes mean the same thing?

    Thanks for your help.
    A finite change is one that is non-zero in size, so pretty much like any you can think of in real life (eg car changing velocity).

    A differential change is indeed an infinitesimal one - the definition of a derivative involves considering a change and then shrinking the size of this change until it is infinitesimal.
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    (Original post by spread_logic_not_hate)
    A finite change is one that is non-zero in size, so pretty much like any you can think of in real life (eg car changing velocity).

    A differential change is indeed an infinitesimal one - the definition of a derivative involves considering a change and then shrinking the size of this change until it is infinitesimal.
    Thanks that made things more clear.

    So the word 'differential' concerns itself primary with the size of the variable. What relevance does this have with 'differentiating'?
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    So the word 'differential' concerns itself primary with the size of the variable. What relevance does this have with 'differentiating'?
    The 'differential' is the quantity that is found when considering how something varies when adding an infinitesimal amount to it. Mathemematically the differential is represented by

     \dfrac{dy}{dx}

    'Differentiating' is the process you go through to find the differential, i.e.

     \dfrac{d}{dx} [x^2] = 2x

    is an example of the process of differentiating x^2 in order to find its differential, 2x.

    Is that kind of what you're asking about?
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    (Original post by spread_logic_not_hate)
    The 'differential' is the quantity that is found when considering how something varies when adding an infinitesimal amount to it. Mathemematically the differential is represented by

     \dfrac{dy}{dx}

    'Differentiating' is the process you go through to find the differential, i.e.

     \dfrac{d}{dx} [x^2] = 2x

    is an example of the process of differentiating x^2 in order to find its differential, 2x.

    Is that kind of what you're asking about?
    Yeh thank you
 
 
 
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