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    can anybody help me with the treatment of nervous ketosis in cows?
    i wasn't with the vet long enough to see the treatment but do you use glycine or something? and is it injected or given orally?
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    never heard of it nicola... ketosis is all to do with lack of energy though, so i would say that glucose (glycerine) would be the treatment to provide an energy source, i would imagine it could be given orally but maybe s/c... but im totally guessing this! have u tried a google search? il have a look in one of my books and get back to you on this one!
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    (Original post by Rachhyyyy)
    never heard of it nicola... ketosis is all to do with lack of energy though, so i would say that glucose would be the treatment to provide an energy source, i would imagine it could be given orally or s/c... but im totally guessing this! have u tried a google search? il have a look in one of my books and get back to you on this one!
    yeahh i searched and it came up with something about glycine, it wasn't very clear though. i think it is ketosis, think maybe the vet called it nervous ketosis because the cow was showing neurological symptoms too, because whenever i've searched it it's not come up with the nervous bit. and thanks
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    ah yeh i'd never heard of it called "nervous" before but maybe it was because of that certain case.

    i looked in my blacks dictionary and its also called "acetonaemia" so u could try searching that aswell.

    ive seen ketone testing in cows, which is just a blood test to determine the levels of ketones in the blood, High ketone levels = Low energy levels because ketones are the cows natural response to gain glucose, similar to the things u do in a level like temperature control.

    it says its caused when a cows energy needs exceeds that available from feed , when blood glucose drops the concentration of free fatty acids rises. this is paralelled by an increase in ketone bodies which provide a third source of energy.

    it says the treatment is glycerine or propyleneglycol diluted in water (im guessing orally but it doesnt actually say that)
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    (Original post by nicola92)
    can anybody help me with the treatment of nervous ketosis in cows?
    i wasn't with the vet long enough to see the treatment but do you use glycine or something? and is it injected or given orally?
    I may be wrong because I have not yet researched this but I know that ketosis is a sign of diabetes. When the body is unable to store sugar due to problems with insulin recognition/production (i.e glucose is present in the urine) the body must obtain its energy from alternative sources. One such source is the break down of fatty acids - from which ketone bodies are derived. The trouble is,a build up of these ketones can decrease the pH of the blood ( increasing the acidity) and have have pathological long term effects.. but i'm gonna read up on this to check i'm not talking rubbish
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    Ketosis (also known as Acetonaemia) is the build up of ketones in the blood. Caused when cows need for carbohydrates is higher than in their feed. When glucose level is low (either cos its not there, or not utilisable - as in diabetes) the animal uses own body reserves, breakdown of these produces ketones. Cow will lose weight very quickly, reduced rumen activity, breath smells of acetone (like pear drops) and can appear 'nervous'.

    Basically need to provide glucose - so treatment is glycerine from what I can remember. Can also inject dextrose and corticosteroids (vet only). Recovery will depend on severity.

    Any help? I'm not sure what you mean by *nervous* ketosis. Never heard it called that, but nervousness can be one of the symptoms.
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    (Original post by Dr. 2 be)
    I may be wrong because I have not yet researched this but I know that ketosis is a sign of diabetes. When the body is unable to store sugar due to problems with insulin recognition/production (i.e glucose is present in the urine) the body must obtain its energy from alternative sources. One such source is the break down of fatty acids - from which ketone bodies are derived. The trouble is,a build up of these ketones can decrease the pH of the blood ( increasing the acidity) and have have pathological long term effects.. but i'm gonna read up on this to check i'm not talking rubbish
    ketosis is caused by the lack of glucose - this can be due to diet, or in diabetes it is because the glucose present can not be utilised. what i mean is, ketosis is a sign of diabetes, but having a cow presenting with ketosis doesnt mean it is diabetic (although it could be).


    or at least that is my understanding of it...
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    I am supporting Villa today, Becky will be pleased to know
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    pear drop breath! awesomeeeee
    well obviously not for the cow lol but it's a massive improvement in smell
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    I've messed up with a comment in my PS I mentioned seeing several animals been euthanised as a farm (cattle)....but I cannot for the life of me remember why! It would appear I must have fallen asleep for that part of the conversation!

    I can just see that my interviewers are going to pull that sentence out and ask why they will euthanised. Don't suppose anyone has got any brainwaves on what could have resulted in about 4 or 5 cows being euthanised? I can see I'm just going to have to search the net til I find something that jogs my memory!
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    (Original post by kookabura)
    I've messed up with a comment in my PS I mentioned seeing several animals been euthanised as a farm (cattle)....but I cannot for the life of me remember why! It would appear I must have fallen asleep for that part of the conversation!

    I can just see that my interviewers are going to pull that sentence out and ask why they will euthanised. Don't suppose anyone has got any brainwaves on what could have resulted in about 4 or 5 cows being euthanised? I can see I'm just going to have to search the net til I find something that jogs my memory!
    were they shot on the farm? or taken off for slaughter? johne's disease??
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    (Original post by kookabura)
    I've messed up with a comment in my PS I mentioned seeing several animals been euthanised as a farm (cattle)....but I cannot for the life of me remember why! It would appear I must have fallen asleep for that part of the conversation!

    I can just see that my interviewers are going to pull that sentence out and ask why they will euthanised. Don't suppose anyone has got any brainwaves on what could have resulted in about 4 or 5 cows being euthanised? I can see I'm just going to have to search the net til I find something that jogs my memory!
    its very rare to see a number fo cows euthanased at one time, but the way you have written it could mean you have seen AN animal euthanised at a number of occasions... usually barron cows are taken to sluaghter so all u wud see on farm is them being loaded onto a truck, and if u had 4/5 cattle needing to be killed, for johnes or anything it wud be unlikely that the euthanasia would take place on farm?!

    ive seen LOADS of cows euthanased, casualty cows are the only thing i can think of where the animal is pts on farm, so things like broken legs, doing the splits and not being able to get up, some cows just dont get up after calving, other "casulties" like teat damage, had one pts because it got gangrene in its udder. cant think of any more at the moment....
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    Yeah, I have seen a cow get euthanased for doing the splits. It was sad, but she was a really old, REALLY moddy cow who always kicked in the parlour and frequently got her unit off, it was so annoying! Also, I would guess ketones in the blood would also be a sign of negative energy balance then, from reading what you have all written above. Could be wrong though.

    I am so screwed for Bristol. I wrote loads in my PS that I either can't remember or don't know that much about. Basically dug myself into a load of holes. So when everyone gives 'know your PS really well' as advice, I start to panic! I am prepping now but it is all a bit stressful
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    (Original post by oaktrees)
    Yeah, I have seen a cow get euthanased for doing the splits. It was sad, but she was a really old, REALLY moddy cow who always kicked in the parlour and frequently got her unit off, it was so annoying! Also, I would guess ketones in the blood would also be a sign of negative energy balance then, from reading what you have all written above. Could be wrong though.

    I am so screwed for Bristol. I wrote loads in my PS that I either can't remember or don't know that much about. Basically dug myself into a load of holes. So when everyone gives 'know your PS really well' as advice, I start to panic! I am prepping now but it is all a bit stressful
    they didnt really ask me much about my PS.
    they asked me about dairy farming before i even told them i'd seen any
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    (Original post by Annaconda)
    they didnt really ask me much about my PS.
    they asked me about dairy farming before i even told them i'd seen any
    oh **** haha..
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    we had 5 cows go down last year after calving!!! My dad was ina bad mood all through calving, wasn't a good calving year!
    But the younger ones do usually get up after a week, we don't shoot them untill we've given them the chance to stand, can sometimes hire this swimming pool thing as well, so like physio for the cow, expensive, but if it saves the cow it's worth it.
    I miss home now... :/
    oww all they asked off my PS was "so you haev your own horse?" other than that nothing off it...
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    (Original post by nicola92)
    oh **** haha..
    They did ask me a lot bout my PS so do learn it!!
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    It seems like they are a bit like the RVC interviews, a real mix mix on what you get. Ah well, now I'm off to learn about pygmy goats.
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    (Original post by Dr. 2 be)
    They did ask me a lot bout my PS so do learn it!!
    I shalla sk again coz u seems to have ignored me last time :p:
    you a grad applicant? and was it your first time applying for bris?
    coz it seams that us re-appliers didnt get asked a lot abour our PS :/
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    Treatment is aimed at re-establishing normoglycemia and reducing serum ketone body concentrations. Bolus IV administration of 500 mL of 50% dextrose solution is a common therapy. This solution is very hyperosmotic and, if administered perivascularly, results in severe tissue swelling and irritation, so care should be taken to assure that it is given IV. Bolus glucose therapy generally results in rapid recovery, especially in cases occurring near peak lactation. However, the effect frequently is transient and relapses are common. Administration of glucocorticoids including dexamethasone or isoflupredone acetate at 5-20 mg/dose, IM, generally results in a more sustained response. Glucose and glucocorticoid therapy may be repeated daily as necessary. Propylene glycol (250-400 g/dose, PO, [~8-14 oz]) acts as a glucose precursor and may be effective as ketosis therapy, especially in mild cases or in combination with other therapies. This dose may be administered twice per day. Overdosing propylene glycol leads to CNS depression.
    Ketosis cases occurring within the first 1-2 wk after calving frequently are more refractory to therapy than those cases occurring nearer to peak lactation. In these cases, a long-acting insulin preparation given IM at 150-200 IU/day may be beneficial. Insulin suppresses both adipose mobilization and ketogenesis, but should be given in combination with glucose or a glucocorticoid to prevent hypoglycemia. Use of insulin in this manner is an extra-label, unapproved use. Other therapies that may be of benefit in refractory ketosis cases are continuous IV glucose infusion and tube feeding.
    Slightly more technical treatment for Ketosis in Cattle. The more information the better
 
 
 
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