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    I am a Year 12 student that harbours aspirations to read History at Oxford. I am aware of the importance placed on the Personal Statement, but have one important question.

    Do you submit the same personal statement to all the universities on your UCAS choices, or can you modify it for Oxford?

    Answers will be appreciated, thanks.
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    Same one to all unis.
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    "harbours aspirations"...

    Sorry, that made me lol.
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    (Original post by MagicCircleBoy)
    "harbours aspirations"...

    Sorry, that made me lol.
    Haha I agree! I was just about to put a comment about it up.

    OP - don't write like that in your PS; even if it is your normal style, admissions tutors will just think that you are trying to impress them and it won't work.
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    PS Reviewer
    Same for all. You don't need to do a specific one anyway.
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    Yes, the personal statement is the same, but don't worry about having to write anything particularly special for Oxford. Other factors (HAT, written work, interview) will all be far more important. Your personal statement will play far more of a role with any other universities you apply for.
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    Please don't write like that in your PS, will do more harm than good.
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    I quite liked the harboured aspirations, but not so much the 'one important question' which turned out to be a little disappointing.
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    It seems like everyone that's posted on this thread is going to or goes to Oxford.

    I congratulate all of you on your brains.

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    (Original post by Brown1)
    I am a Year 12 student that harbours aspirations to read History at Oxford. I am aware of the importance placed on the Personal Statement, but have one important question.

    Do you submit the same personal statement to all the universities on your UCAS choices, or can you modify it for Oxford?

    Answers will be appreciated, thanks.
    You write one personal statement for all the universities.

    However, what universities want out of a personal statement can be vastly different. Some will value extra curricular activities, but Oxford generally wants you to devote the majority of your personal statement to your subject, why you enjoy studying it and why you want to study it at a higher level.
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    (Original post by MagicCircleBoy)
    It seems like everyone that's posted on this thread is going to or goes to Oxford.

    I congratulate all of you on your brains.

    Good work.
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    (Original post by ParadigmShift)
    Please don't write like that in your PS, will do more harm than good.
    I don't see why: it demonstrates a mature writing style. The misuse of incorrect initial capital letters, on the other hand, betrays a poor grasp of English grammar.
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    (Original post by Brown1)
    I am a Year 12 student that harbours aspirations to read History at Oxford. I am aware of the importance placed on the Personal Statement, but have one important question.

    Do you submit the same personal statement to all the universities on your UCAS choices, or can you modify it for Oxford?

    Answers will be appreciated, thanks.
    Seriously. Take the advice of the above posters, your command of the English language is too weak to write in such a style.

    Edit: Also noticed misuse of capital letters..
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    (Original post by doivid)
    You write one personal statement for all the universities.

    However, what universities want out of a personal statement can be vastly different. Some will value extra curricular activities, but Oxford generally wants you to devote the majority of your personal statement to your subject, why you enjoy studying it and why you want to study it at a higher level.
    This. Perhaps I took it to extremes, but I packed a couple of extracurricular activities into one line at the bottom of my personal statement. Everything else was about my subject.

    Anyway, OP, my advice to you is to tailor your personal statement to your Oxford application: heavy on the subject, light on everything else. If your predicted grades, reference, etc are good enough for you to apply to Oxford, you're likely to get offers from other universities whether you mention extracurriculars or not (and I suspect that other universities that Oxford applicants apply to, such as Durham and Warwick, like an emphasis on the subject too, although I have no evidence to support this).

    Finally, the personal statement is probably the least important part of your application anyway. Interviews, grades, and admissions tests are infinitely important. So stop trying to use linguistic flourishes, because you seem to fumble them a lot.
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    (Original post by The Cap'n)
    This. Perhaps I took it to extremes, but I packed a couple of extracurricular activities into one line at the bottom of my personal statement. Everything else was about my subject.

    Anyway, OP, my advice to you is to tailor your personal statement to your Oxford application: heavy on the subject, light on everything else. If your predicted grades, reference, etc are good enough for you to apply to Oxford, you're likely to get offers from other universities whether you mention extracurriculars or not (and I suspect that other universities that Oxford applicants apply to, such as Durham and Warwick, like an emphasis on the subject too, although I have no evidence to support this).

    Finally, the personal statement is probably the least important part of your application anyway. Interviews, grades, and admissions tests are infinitely important. So stop trying to use linguistic flourishes, because you seem to fumble them a lot.
    i kinda disagree, i'd recommend doing a personal statement that is definitely not tailored to oxford. you have to remember that most people do not get into oxford and you do not want to harm your chances anywhere else. plus having spoken to tutors the general consensus is that oxford puts less weight on the personal statement than other places. you won't get an oxford offer without an interview which they will always consider a far superior reflection of personality and academic ability than a personal statement. your grades and HAT get you an interview at oxford so the personal statement is fairly redundant, and may only be used to prompt interview questions or to find out exceptional information about the candidate.
    since lots of other unis don't interview the personal statements are much more important. i'd therefore recommend tailoring your personal statement to why you're a good history applicant rather than to anywhere in particular.
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    (Original post by chocolatebear)
    i kinda disagree, i'd recommend doing a personal statement that is definitely not tailored to oxford. you have to remember that most people do not get into oxford and you do not want to harm your chances anywhere else. plus having spoken to tutors the general consensus is that oxford puts less weight on the personal statement than other places. you won't get an oxford offer without an interview which they will always consider a far superior reflection of personality and academic ability than a personal statement. your grades and HAT get you an interview at oxford so the personal statement is fairly redundant, and may only be used to prompt interview questions or to find out exceptional information about the candidate.
    since lots of other unis don't interview the personal statements are much more important. i'd therefore recommend tailoring your personal statement to why you're a good history applicant rather than to anywhere in particular.
    You're assuming that there's a difference between proving that you're a good Oxford applicant and proving that you're a good history applicant. By devoting most of the personal statement to the subject, as I recommend anyone applying to Oxford to do, he'd be demonstrating that he has a passion for it and that he's done some research into it. I assume that any Oxford applicant will also be applying to a clutch of other high-ranking universities as well. At any of those high-ranking universities, they'll be looking first and foremost for people who can demonstrate their commitment to their subject. At any rate, it won't harm the application.
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    (Original post by Good bloke)
    I don't see why: it demonstrates a mature writing style. The misuse of incorrect initial capital letters, on the other hand, betrays a poor grasp of English grammar.
    :dontknow: Regardless of whether that is the OP's normal, natural style, I thought there might be a rather significant risk of admissions tutors finding it a tad pompous/trying too hard.
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    (Original post by ParadigmShift)
    :dontknow: Regardless of whether that is the OP's normal, natural style, I thought there might be a rather significant risk of admissions tutors finding it a tad pompous/trying too hard.
    Look, it's just absurd to suggest that being able to write well is a negative attribute.
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    (Original post by The Cap'n)
    This. Perhaps I took it to extremes, but I packed a couple of extracurricular activities into one line at the bottom of my personal statement. Everything else was about my subject.

    Anyway, OP, my advice to you is to tailor your personal statement to your Oxford application: heavy on the subject, light on everything else. If your predicted grades, reference, etc are good enough for you to apply to Oxford, you're likely to get offers from other universities whether you mention extracurriculars or not (and I suspect that other universities that Oxford applicants apply to, such as Durham and Warwick, like an emphasis on the subject too, although I have no evidence to support this).

    Finally, the personal statement is probably the least important part of your application anyway. Interviews, grades, and admissions tests are infinitely important. So stop trying to use linguistic flourishes, because you seem to fumble them a lot.
    I disagree with that. Other universities may be interested to read about your ECs, and Oxford would presumably care more about grades, HAT, interview, written work, than a personal statement.
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    (Original post by BJack)
    Look, it's just absurd to suggest that being able to write well is a negative attribute.
    But surely being able to "write well" constitutes writing appropriately? Whilst we are not denying that "harbours aspirations" is a much more interesting way of saying "wants", it comes across as being unnecessarily wordy and a little pompous. On an internet forum, or for that matter in a personal statement, this is hardly a desirable characteristic. In fact, when taking into consideration the character limit of 4000 spaces, the extra 15 characters might be better employed elsewhere.
 
 
 

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