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    Hello, how many maths (and further maths) modules are required to do STEP I, II and III papers? I assume that you need maths A2 for step I, further maths AS for step II and further maths A2 for step III, although this is probably incorrect
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    Sounds about right. I think you can get away with doing STEP II with only maths A2 though. Regardless if you are going to do STEP, get as much maths done as you can.
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    They (the syllabus) say that STEP I and II is only doable with single maths only, but doing FP1 makes some of the questions so much easier.
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    You don't need Further Maths for STEP I or II (although I'm not saying it doesn't help!)
    You do need it for STEP III though, although I'm not sure whether you need the entire A-Level or just the AS.
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    In fact, even for STEP III, the pure questions usually don't need further maths - that is, you can probably find 6 questions that *in theory* could be done only with the normal maths A-level. In practice, it would be one heck of an ask. The applied tends to be rely much more on FM knowledge.
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    Sorry to hijack the thread, but how does STEP II or II compare with the likes of BMO1 and BMO2 (i suspect the IMO will be just a bit harder than these )
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    (Original post by twig)
    Sorry to hijack the thread, but how does STEP II or II compare with the likes of BMO1 and BMO2 (i suspect the IMO will be just a bit harder than these )
    They're quite different things in various ways, making them not very comparable. In my experience, STEP is more of a test of an understanding of A-level maths and further maths, one's ability to deal with algebra and also one's capability just to use hints and be able to be guided. The olympiads are completely different in style in the sense that it requires more... innovative ideas - spotting tricks.

    If I were to personally rate them in terms of how difficult I find them, it would probably be, starting with the 'easiest':

    STEP I, STEP II, STEP III/BMO-1, and then miles ahead is BMO-2.

    By the way, if you're asking this in fear that a 'bad' BMO mark will mean that this will correspond to a bad mark in STEP, don't worry - had I sat BMO-1 last year, I wouldn't have got more than 25/60, and I still got an S in STEP I last year.

    But really, there isn't much point trying to compare BMO to STEP - they're two completely different types of papers, with two very different aims.
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    (Original post by Unbounded)
    They're quite different things in various ways, making them not very comparable. In my experience, STEP is more of a test of an understanding of A-level maths and further maths, one's ability to deal with algebra and also one's capability just to use hints and be able to be guided. The olympiads are completely different in style in the sense that it requires more... innovative ideas - spotting tricks.

    If I were to personally rate them in terms of how difficult I find them, it would probably be, starting with the 'easiest':

    STEP I, STEP II, STEP III/BMO-1, and then miles ahead is BMO-2.

    By the way, if you're asking this in fear that a 'bad' BMO mark will mean that this will correspond to a bad mark in STEP, don't worry - had I sat BMO-1 last year, I wouldn't have got more than 25/60, and I still got an S in STEP I last year.
    But really, there isn't much point trying to compare BMO to STEP - they're two completely different types of papers, with two very different aims.
    Quite the contray, ironically. I am in year 11, currently, and have got a distinction on BMO1 (albeit a very low one), and hopefuly should get at least 10+ on BMO2. However, I have little knowledge of the alevel topics as of now(i.e. I know more of number theory than any calculus), so I was wondering whether a good mark in BMO -assuming my marks in BMO improve next year- correlates to a good STEP mark (not the converse...).

    Also, for BMO1 most of the knowledge needed is quite basic (i.e. simple euclidean geometry, little of any alevel topics), but these then have to be used in an intuitive and unique way to solve the problems, sometimes with a long-winded method of multiple steps. Does STEP involve the same/ higher level of mathematical intuition and less/same/more number of step, but with the content being just focused on the alevel topics?
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    (Original post by twig)
    However, I have little knowledge of the alevel topics as of now(i.e. I know more of number theory than any calculus), so I was wondering whether a good mark in BMO -assuming my marks in BMO improve next year- correlates to a good STEP mark (not the converse...).
    Yes, I'd imagine so in most cases.
    Also, for BMO1 most of the knowledge needed is quite basic (i.e. simple euclidean geometry, little of any alevel topics), but these then have to be used in an intuitive and unique way to solve the problems, sometimes with a long-winded method of multiple steps. Does STEP involve the same/ higher level of mathematical intuition and less/same/more number of step, but with the content being just focused on the alevel topics?
    No, the level of intuition is not usually as high as required in BMO-1. The number of 'steps' to a question varies and depends on your approach to the question and the question itself.
 
 
 
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