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    Hey

    I was wondering if anyone knew if there are any websites or book to do with understanding reaction mechanisms

    I am in my second year of university, and im finding my lack of understanding mechanisms annoying. I feel as if i need to have a good understanding of mechanisms, so someone can give me a mechanism and i can be like 'oh there is an OH group, so that must go to the nitrogen' if people understand me.

    So yea, if anyone knows how i can find a resource that will make me competent with reaction mechanisms in general, that would be a great help
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    (Original post by nolybear)
    Hey

    I was wondering if anyone knew if there are any websites or book to do with understanding reaction mechanisms

    I am in my second year of university, and im finding my lack of understanding mechanisms annoying. I feel as if i need to have a good understanding of mechanisms, so someone can give me a mechanism and i can be like 'oh there is an OH group, so that must go to the nitrogen' if people understand me.

    So yea, if anyone knows how i can find a resource that will make me competent with reaction mechanisms in general, that would be a great help
    Hey

    I've used this website in the past for it,it's been pretty useful:

    ChemGuide

    Hope that helps
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    (Original post by nolybear)
    Hey

    I was wondering if anyone knew if there are any websites or book to do with understanding reaction mechanisms

    I am in my second year of university, and im finding my lack of understanding mechanisms annoying. I feel as if i need to have a good understanding of mechanisms, so someone can give me a mechanism and i can be like 'oh there is an OH group, so that must go to the nitrogen' if people understand me.

    So yea, if anyone knows how i can find a resource that will make me competent with reaction mechanisms in general, that would be a great help
    Chemguide might be a good start if you are very "green" to reaction mechanism, but since you are in second year of uni, I highly doubt it, unless your first year didn't cover a lot of organic chem. Have you tried reading from textbooks, ie Clayden organic chem is pretty good for undergrad study, but start off with peter sykes, guidebook to mechanism in organic chemistry. Have a look through it first before clayden.
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    There is an inherent logic behind mechanisms but it's not very obvious, do lots of examples in as many textbooks with answers as you can find. I'd suggest you work through each chapter of Claydon on the work you've supposed to have covered (that's in the book). There are normally a few answer books in the library so you can check what you've done right and/or wrong. If there is something you don't understand I suggest you ask someone who would know :yep:

    Here is a list of named reactions and most of these have mechanisms if you really want a website :p: Bear in mind though it's not really aimed at undergrad students.
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    thanks for the help guys!!

    Yea i mean my degree is half chemistry and have biology (i do a strange course where i do two separate subjects) so i dont have the kind of knowledge somebody who would be doing a pure chemistry degree

    (Original post by EierVonSatan)
    I'd suggest you work through each chapter of Claydon on the work you've supposed to have covered (that's in the book).
    none of my courses actually tell me to use this book, when you say i should use it do you mean as an additional resource to understanding reactions

    thanks again for the help
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    (Original post by nolybear)
    thanks for the help guys!!

    Yea i mean my degree is half chemistry and have biology (i do a strange course where i do two separate subjects) so i dont have the kind of knowledge somebody who would be doing a pure chemistry degree



    none of my courses actually tell me to use this book, when you say i should use it do you mean as an additional resource to understanding reactions

    thanks again for the help
    I just find that book to be a pretty standard sort of organic text which is clearly set out and explained. What are you using for your organic text?
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    Hey

    Sorry about the late reply. I have only been recommended the Introduction to Organic Chemistry by brown and poon for my organic course, however it is not a requirement, and we only use the lecture notes for my organic course.
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    (Original post by nolybear)
    Hey

    Sorry about the late reply. I have only been recommended the Introduction to Organic Chemistry by brown and poon for my organic course, however it is not a requirement, and we only use the lecture notes for my organic course.
    well individuals find different books useful to them. though majority of people find that the general organic textbook(clayden, etc) useful, if you read through it and don't really like it compared to other organic book you have read, you should really use the one you are more comfortable with understanding the contents.

    my point is that, what is recommended by your course might not be the best, nor is our recommendation on this site; you can borrow them from your library and see which one suits you more.
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    (Original post by shengoc)
    well individuals find different books useful to them. though majority of people find that the general organic textbook(clayden, etc) useful, if you read through it and don't really like it compared to other organic book you have read, you should really use the one you are more comfortable with understanding the contents.

    my point is that, what is recommended by your course might not be the best, nor is our recommendation on this site; you can borrow them from your library and see which one suits you more.
    Unless you're studying at Manchester, Liverpool or Cambridge, in which case you really want CGWW, since it's basically our organic courses. :p:
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    (Original post by Kyle_S-C)
    Unless you're studying at Manchester, Liverpool or Cambridge, in which case you really want CGWW, since it's basically our organic courses. :p:
    Presumably because the author(s) are from these respective unis; :woo:
 
 
 
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