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    Hi everyone,

    I'm going to graduate this year (almost certainly a high 2:1) in philosophy. Seriously considering a career in law (I'd like to work in either IP or human rights) and was wondering which of the bewildering number of courses I should take. Is there any benefit to doing a 2 year masters course over a GDL/CPE? Where best (for employment) to study such a course?

    Any help most appreciated.
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    Hey, I'm going to help you out because you're a fellow Curb Your Enthusiasm fan!

    If you'd like to work in IP, I'd say the GDL is definitely your best bet.
    a. Though it's a very intense course you cover all the core law subjects, like criminal law and tort law etc, and for some one who has a presumably small amount of knowledge on the law (sorry if that's wrong), and for some one who still isn't sure what line he wants to go on, studying the core subjects would be good in helping you consolidate any prospective interest you have in certain fields. For example, studying criminal law may really make you want to go down the human rights path over everything else.

    b. If you get a training contract with a firm, the entire year will be free for you, because not only will your course fees be paid by them, but you also get a maintenance grant.


    This is just my opinion though, the two fields you show interest in are not really similar to each other and I think few firms would have both an IP and a human rights department.

    Doing the GDL would give you a clearer picture on where your legal strengths lie and you may even decided to go into a completely different line.

    Long live Larry David
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    (Original post by Spitfire19)
    Hey, I'm going to help you out because you're a fellow Curb Your Enthusiasm fan!

    If you'd like to work in IP, I'd say the GDL is definitely your best bet.
    a. Though it's a very intense course you cover all the core law subjects, like criminal law and tort law etc, and for some one who has a presumably small amount of knowledge on the law (sorry if that's wrong), and for some one who still isn't sure what line he wants to go on, studying the core subjects would be good in helping you consolidate any prospective interest you have in certain fields. For example, studying criminal law may really make you want to go down the human rights path over everything else.

    b. If you get a training contract with a firm, the entire year will be free for you, because not only will your course fees be paid by them, but you also get a maintenance grant.


    This is just my opinion though, the two fields you show interest in are not really similar to each other and I think few firms would have both an IP and a human rights department.

    Doing the GDL would give you a clearer picture on where your legal strengths lie and you may even decided to go into a completely different line.

    Long live Larry David
    Any qualifying law course will have all seven courses--qualifying masters, GDL, affiliated law, senior status law--they'll all require those seven courses at a minimum. You can't do the LPC/BPTC, nor practice law, without having taken European, Public, Criminal, Tort, Contract, Land, and Equity and Trusts. Some masters programmes and some senior status degrees offer scope for subjects outside the seven foundation courses.

    Awards from firms in terms of fees/maintenance vary substantially, and that's assuming the OP gets a TC. He's too late to apply for the GDL now, and too late to apply for senior status degrees. He might be able to apply for MA in Law qualifying degrees at Sheffield or Bristol; I don't know when the closing dates for those courses are. He's almost certainly too late to apply for a TC to start studying law next year.

    OP, you're probably going to have to take a year out and start applying in the autumn. Is your undergrad university a high-ranked one? That will help you quite a bit.
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    (Original post by tomheppy)
    Is there any benefit to doing a 2 year masters course over a GDL/CPE?
    You wouldn't be able to do a law masters without already having an undergraduate law degree or the GDL. I think what you're talking about is a two-year "affiliated" or "senior status" (terminology varies between unis) undergraduate law degree. It would have no benefit over the GDL in terms of your career, but you might find it more interesting if you can afford the time and money.

    (Original post by jjarvis)
    He's too late to apply for the GDL now
    Not true. The deadline's a joke.
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    (Original post by jjarvis)
    Any qualifying law course will have all seven courses--qualifying masters, GDL, affiliated law, senior status law--they'll all require those seven courses at a minimum. You can't do the LPC/BPTC, nor practice law, without having taken European, Public, Criminal, Tort, Contract, Land, and Equity and Trusts. Some masters programmes and some senior status degrees offer scope for subjects outside the seven foundation courses.

    Awards from firms in terms of fees/maintenance vary substantially, and that's assuming the OP gets a TC. He's too late to apply for the GDL now, and too late to apply for senior status degrees. He might be able to apply for MA in Law qualifying degrees at Sheffield or Bristol; I don't know when the closing dates for those courses are. He's almost certainly too late to apply for a TC to start studying law next year.

    OP, you're probably going to have to take a year out and start applying in the autumn. Is your undergrad university a high-ranked one? That will help you quite a bit.
    I go to Nottingham. If I apply next year,what are the chances of getting a training contract (that's where they pay your fees,right?)? I suppose my dad could pull some strings...
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    I read that the deadline for applications (via that central board) is sometime in March. You don't need to be a scientist to do IP law,do you?
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    (Original post by tomheppy)
    I read that the deadline for applications (via that central board) is sometime in March. You don't need to be a scientist to do IP law,do you?
    I think that's mainly patents your thinking about. It's preferable to have a background in science or engineering or something so you can really understand the products
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    You need to look very carefully at the calibre of people who practice IP law and see if you measure up else you could be wasting your time.
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    I'm sure you're not too late to apply. I applied way after the deadline, in the Summer. Just emailed them and asked if they had places. All 3 in London did. They just want the $$$$
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    Jjarvis, he's not too late to start cracking now. He could even potentially apply for TCs 31st July. Be interviewed in August. Get a TC. Pay fees, and begin GDL in September.

    Although, to the OP, it may be a little tricky if your CV shows no prior interest in the law, as you have missed the deadline for VSs (Work experience). [Papa could pull some strings on this front.]

    Hope that helps.
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    (Original post by dalianatkinson)
    Jjarvis, he's not too late to start cracking now. He could even potentially apply for TCs 31st July. Be interviewed in August. Get a TC. Pay fees, and begin GDL in September.

    Although, to the OP, it may be a little tricky if your CV shows no prior interest in the law, as you have missed the deadline for VSs (Work experience). [Papa could pull some strings on this front.]

    Hope that helps.
    Cheers dude. I did do work experience in a law firm for a week after my GCSEs.
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    (Original post by dalianatkinson)
    Jjarvis, he's not too late to start cracking now. He could even potentially apply for TCs 31st July. Be interviewed in August. Get a TC. Pay fees, and begin GDL in September.

    Although, to the OP, it may be a little tricky if your CV shows no prior interest in the law, as you have missed the deadline for VSs (Work experience). [Papa could pull some strings on this front.]

    Hope that helps.
    Ah, my mistake.
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    (Original post by tomheppy)
    Cheers dude. I did do work experience in a law firm for a week after my GCSEs.
    You will need more than one weeks work experience to get a TC!
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    (Original post by legaleagle87)
    You will need more than one weeks work experience to get a TC!
    Thought so. Do you think I should apply to law school this year and do work experience after I graduate or work experience and then go to law school?
 
 
 
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