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    Hi

    I'm really confused as to which course to take in uni. I orginally wanted to take midwifery but after doing a bit of research, the hours you have to work put me off as it is very ant-social and you don't have a lot of choice of shifts.

    Does anyone know if nursing shifts are more flexible, like 9-5 or leave when ever you finish your shift.

    thanks
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    nursing and midwifery shifts are the same, you get 8hr shifts, long days and nights- depending on the placement. You will be expected to work antisocial hours on BOTH courses
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    ^this is generally true.

    however midwifry students have to deliver 40 babies before they can qualify. my mum (a midwifry student mentor) says that it is very common for third year student to have to do extra night and day shifts to tot up their delivery score. she once told me of one nursing student who stayed in the hospital for 50hours straight because she only needed to deliver two more babies to qualify.
    so yr 1 and 2 will be fine and yr 3, if your lucky, will be fine.... but the extra hours in 3rd year is not uncommon for a midwife.

    also my mum has said that if midwifery students are flagging behind on deliveries (because lets face it you cannot decide when a baby will be born) they may place you on a big meternity ward, where they deliver 25-40 babys a day.... that always does the trick.lol.
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    If you want a 9-5 job then neither nursing nor midwifery are good career choices. There are some jobs you can do after you qualify that will be 9-5 but they often don't involve what you would typically consider "nursing" or "midwifery"
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    (Original post by kamc)
    If you want a 9-5 job then neither nursing nor midwifery are good career choices. There are some jobs you can do after you qualify that will be 9-5 but they often don't involve what you would typically consider "nursing" or "midwifery"
    so being a community nurse isn't working? working in and running clinics isn't nursing, being a health visitor isn't, or running an antenatal clinic isn't midwifery?!
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    (Original post by ballerinabetty)
    ^this is generally true.

    however midwifry students have to deliver 40 babies before they can qualify. my mum (a midwifry student mentor) says that it is very common for third year student to have to do extra night and day shifts to tot up their delivery score. she once told me of one nursing student who stayed in the hospital for 50hours straight because she only needed to deliver two more babies to qualify.
    so yr 1 and 2 will be fine and yr 3, if your lucky, will be fine.... but the extra hours in 3rd year is not uncommon for a midwife.

    also my mum has said that if midwifery students are flagging behind on deliveries (because lets face it you cannot decide when a baby will be born) they may place you on a big meternity ward, where they deliver 25-40 babys a day.... that always does the trick.lol.

    A lot of 3rd year nurses have to pull extra shifts too to get their clinical skills signed off, especially with critical care, plus making up for sick days, most 3rd years end up doing a few weeks more than they should of shifts
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    (Original post by Subcutaneous)
    so being a community nurse isn't working? working in and running clinics isn't nursing, being a health visitor isn't, or running an antenatal clinic isn't midwifery?!
    Thats not what I said. Most people have an image of what nurses and midwives do and many of the roles they do that have 9-5 hours aren't the typical image that most people imagine when they think of a nurse or a midwife.
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    (Original post by kamc)
    Thats not what I said. Most people have an image of what nurses and midwives do and many of the roles they do that have 9-5 hours aren't the typical image that most people imagine when they think of a nurse or a midwife.

    actually the community roles probably do more traditional nursing than ward nurses
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    (Original post by Subcutaneous)
    A lot of 3rd year nurses have to pull extra shifts too to get their clinical skills signed off, especially with critical care, plus making up for sick days, most 3rd years end up doing a few weeks more than they should of shifts
    oh definitly all 3rd years on any degree need to put in extra time. however with midwifery even if you have managed to get all your clinical skills signed off and not had any sick days you will still have to wait for babies to be born so you can hit your target. it is not that one is harder than the other, just they are different and it depends on what op prefers.

    also OP: if you want to go into healthcare be ready for doing shifts at times of the day you do not like and working long hours on your feet. do the speciality you prefer because if you like it then getting though a long day with it is so much easier. there is no such thing as flexable hours when your a health care provider. but that does not mean that you will be working 90hours a week either.
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    (Original post by ballerinabetty)
    ^this is generally true.

    however midwifry students have to deliver 40 babies before they can qualify. my mum (a midwifry student mentor) says that it is very common for third year student to have to do extra night and day shifts to tot up their delivery score. she once told me of one nursing student who stayed in the hospital for 50hours straight because she only needed to deliver two more babies to qualify.
    so yr 1 and 2 will be fine and yr 3, if your lucky, will be fine.... but the extra hours in 3rd year is not uncommon for a midwife.

    also my mum has said that if midwifery students are flagging behind on deliveries (because lets face it you cannot decide when a baby will be born) they may place you on a big meternity ward, where they deliver 25-40 babys a day.... that always does the trick.lol.
    what if they have twins does that count as 2 deliveries?
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    (Original post by goodLife)
    what if they have twins does that count as 2 deliveries?

    midwives dont tend to be the main deliverer in natural multiple births as its a high risk, they'd asisst and i'm sure the NMC requires them to be present and asisst in high risk births
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    (Original post by goodLife)
    what if they have twins does that count as 2 deliveries?
    a doctor would deliver twins. so no it wouldnt be classed as a delivery at all
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    (Original post by Subcutaneous)
    midwives dont tend to be the main deliverer in natural multiple births as its a high risk, they'd asisst and i'm sure the NMC requires them to be present and asisst in high risk births
    I know this is an old post, but my friend has delivered twins, and we're only first years While twins are high risk if all goes well in labour/pregnany with no problems or fetal distress with both twins head down, midwives (and even students!) wiill deliver them.


    And yes it did count as two :P
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    (Original post by Subcutaneous)
    so being a community nurse isn't working?
    there's not many community jobs that that are purely 9 -5 , a lot of extended day working about now , plus the weekend cover that that falls in many trusts to the day teams even if there is a dedicated night team for community nursing , increasingly community nursing is not organised on the traditional roles but much more integrated and a 24/7 service to deliver the service when it is needed, expect to see new jobs in the community appointing people on rotational contracts including nights and weekends ..

    [/QUOTE]
 
 
 
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