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Conservatives would rise uni fees to £7k? watch

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    We might not pay directly for the whole cost, but surely the better approach is to treat like "you earn more, so you get taxed more" rather than the "you might earn more, so you have to pay".

    A better education is a better society. Its in societies interest so it should burden most of, if not all of the costs.
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    Wahey i'll be already in/out of uni by then.
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    (Original post by Steeps)
    Only source I have is myself, I started my course on the "old system" back in 2005 and due to my own issues I am still on the same course but now in my second year. There are people on the current 3k who have been to uni and now graduated my LEA still have me on the 1k system as that's when I started. There's no way they could get away with upping the fees of students already enroled on courses.

    Considering there was uproar when fees went from 1k to 3k yet now it appears to be acceptable, upping it again and offering people loans to cover it most people will just accept it as they don't feel the real impact until a few years down the line when they're still repaying the loan.
    This isn't true for the new system. Fees went up this year, albeit by a 'little' amount, they still changed. Whether there is a rule that it can't go up by alot, but I would imagine that isn't the case and Parliament can change the amount at a drop of the hat.
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    (Original post by ToxicMuppet)
    We might not pay directly for the whole cost, but surely the better approach is to treat like "you earn more, so you get taxed more" rather than the "you might earn more, so you have to pay".

    A better education is a better society. Its in societies interest so it should burden most of, if not all of the costs.
    I personally disagree that other people/society as a whole should have to pay for my education.
    As it is, they did pay for an awful lot of it, but a choice to go to university is just that - your own choice.
    Now, as I say, I was lucky to get my education for such a low price, but I'm now earning a figure lower than I would've been if I'd never attended university at all (again, out of choice). Why is it fair that society should pay for my decisions?
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    (Original post by ToxicMuppet)
    This isn't true for the new system. Fees went up this year, albeit by a 'little' amount, they still changed. Whether there is a rule that it can't go up by alot, but I would imagine that isn't the case and Parliament can change the amount at a drop of the hat.
    Thats inflation. You agreed to that when you started, that the fees would go up by inflation each year.
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    (Original post by flipshot)
    Thats inflation. You agreed to that when you started, that the fees would go up by inflation each year.
    This, when I started it was ~1100, now it's ~1300 on the old system.
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    (Original post by cpj1987)
    I personally disagree that other people/society as a whole should have to pay for my education.
    As it is, they did pay for an awful lot of it, but a choice to go to university is just that - your own choice.
    Now, as I say, I was lucky to get my education for such a low price, but I'm now earning a figure lower than I would've been if I'd never attended university at all (again, out of choice). Why is it fair that society should pay for my decisions?
    Well its generally accepted that primary and secondary education is beneficial to society, would your view apply to that also? Society gets the benefit of higher income, tax etc, so surely it should help with the costs.

    I think your choice argument is irrelevant. What if the government changed the law so that everyone had to stay in education untill they earned a degree?

    Touche flipshot, completely overlooked that. Thats reassuring than if its true.
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    (Original post by ToxicMuppet)
    Well its generally accepted that primary and secondary education is beneficial to society, would your view apply to that also? Society gets the benefit of higher income, tax etc, so surely it should help with the costs.
    No, because primary and secondary education are compulsory. I see no issue with charging fees for A-Levels, though (perhaps £500 per A-Level, per year) - something affordable.

    A degree-level education does not directly result in a higher salary. Of course, overall, those with degrees as a group will contribute more in taxes, but I think these things could be more practically done taking into the account that people like myself are only contributing to THEMSELVES with their education.
    The fact that I went through three years of university doesn't do anything special for the economy.

    (Original post by ToxicMuppet)
    I think your choice argument is irrelevant. What if the government changed the law so that everyone had to stay in education untill they earned a degree?
    In that case, the government should find the funding. Students should not pay for education they're forced into, imo.
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    (Original post by netprime)
    Exactly, even with an increased in fees they'll be an increase in loans as well. I doubt they'd be an increase in grants, as the idea of raising tuition fees is to cut public spending... It's worth the money though, although I still think it depends on what degree you do, but thats another debate for another thread.
    The tuition fees are loaned to the student by the government at a massive subsidy paid for from public monies. Increasing tuition fees and funding them as at present will lead to a massive rise in public spending not a cut! Where do you think the government get the money from?
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    I doubt any party would rise it to 7k, though all parties may increase it slightly, it tends to go up a bit each year anyway doesnt it?

    At the moment, you pay however much you paid when you first began, though I think all students who now started when the fees were significantly lower, have now graduated.
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    (Original post by Miss_Scarlet)
    I doubt any party would rise it to 7k, though all parties may increase it slightly, it tends to go up a bit each year anyway doesnt it?

    At the moment, you pay however much you paid when you first began, though I think all students who now started when the fees were significantly lower, have now graduated.
    I doubt any party would rise it to 7k

    I suspect that is the minimum it will rise to in 2011 at the end of the review!
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    There won't be a magical "increase in funding" to match the fees.

    Best case scenario (could be wishful thinking), the fees won't have to be paid upfront but will be paid for by loans at a commercial rate, not the current system, which will mean your debt will be considerably more than the amount of the fees.

    Worst case scenario - fees will be up front. If you can't raise the cash then uni won't be for you.
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    thank god i'm about to finish, and not about to start, is all i can say.
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    I don't think fees should be raised. I would prefer to see a system where the sciences, mathematics and engineering courses are fee free, to encourage there undertaking. Then other courses which contribute little in the way to society should not be subsidised at all. That way we get the best net benefit overall. Also, academic merit should be a large part of the funding arrangements, IE. full scholarships which encourage people to push and challenge themselves. That's my 2 cents

    Of course I realise this may sound elitist, but I do think exceptions should be made when it comes to applicants from worse personal circumstances and judged on a case by case basis.

    PS. I know this may be more expensive, and you'll wonder where the money will come from. But if the government is willing to throw 50 billion at a bank on the basis of a knee jerk reaction. I'm sure they could spare a few billion for important things like education :p:
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    I read an article regarding this a few weeks ago and thought it would be interesting to find out if fees were to rise to £7000 would students be prepared to pay them?

    So I thought it would be a great idea to post a poll on my blog with a massive 85% of students saying they wouldnt pay that for the course they are doing at the moment. And it caused great amounts of debate, which was good to see!
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    (Original post by MagicNMedicine)
    There won't be a magical "increase in funding" to match the fees.

    Best case scenario (could be wishful thinking), the fees won't have to be paid upfront but will be paid for by loans at a commercial rate, not the current system, which will mean your debt will be considerably more than the amount of the fees.

    Worst case scenario - fees will be up front. If you can't raise the cash then uni won't be for you.
    This.
    It is ludicrously naive to think increases in loans will match increases in fees in the current economic mess without interest rates being commercial.
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    Good, raise it to the true cost. Then implement funding that is student finance-esque so it is not a barrier to entry.
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    I read an article on this proposal a few weeks ago, so as we are in touch with alot of students I thought it would be interesting to find out if tuition fees were to rise, would it put them off going to University...

    A massive 85% of our readers said it would put them off and it would stop them going to University, which is not a good sign if it was ever to be put in place.
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    (Original post by crazylemon)
    Good, raise it to the true cost.
    No thanks. I don't fancy being in £250k debt when I graduate.
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    (Original post by Phalanges)
    No thanks. I don't fancy being in £250k debt when I graduate.
    It is student debt, not commercial debt, you only pay it if you earn it off if not. Otherwise you pay for it by increased tax but other people who did not go to uni also pay for it.

    It is fair for people to pay for what they use, I don't see why anyone else should fund your education.
 
 
 
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