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    (Original post by DanD9)
    No idea, for me though it's not how long you have to pay it back its the amount. A £40k+ debt when leaving university is just a crazy amount of money to owe for anyone be they rich or poor. The only saving grace though is the fact that you have to be working before they want the money back.
    If inflation is 3% you do realise you have to earn over £21,600 before you start making the balance go down? 4.8% was the rate for 07/08 when you'd have to earn over £25,700 to make your balance drop.

    Large numbers of people won't be paying this off.
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    (Original post by Quady)
    No it isn't, I challenge you find the link between fee increases and inflation.
    You need to tell some of the universities and the guardian then:
    Tuition Fees
    Information for new students and students who started their course after 1st September 2006
    In 2010/11, tuition fees for full-time Home and EU undergraduate students will be £3,290 (and will increase each year with inflation).
    http://www.port.ac.uk/departments/st...nfeesin200910/

    Tuition fees will also increase with inflation by approximately 5% each year of study.
    https://lfylive.lse.ac.uk/lfy/tc/enq...&searchString=

    Tuition fees of £3,000 were introduced in September 2006 and have increased in line with inflation year-on-year.
    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/education...-increase.html

    Although there not linked to RPI or CPI. How else do you explain how they get the figures for the increase. There not a set percentage each year or a fixed amount like £100 a year. Plus in years where inflation has been higher they have gone up more than in years when it has been lower - like this year.
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    (Original post by radfordboy87)
    I read an article on this proposal a few weeks ago, so as we are in touch with alot of students I thought it would be interesting to find out if tuition fees were to rise, would it put them off going to University...

    A massive 85% of our readers said it would put them off and it would stop them going to University, which is not a good sign if it was ever to be put in place.

    Tom Smith - Studentspayless.com
    Blogging to help students save money
    #

    They said that before fees and before topup fees...
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    (Original post by Quady)
    How do fees paid (no not) after graduation make education less avaliable to anyone?

    (btw who brought in fees and top up fees?)

    The thought of the debt i'll have to pay when i leave actually terrifies me a little and I'll be doing a course partly funded by the NHS, so a person who have to pay back an even greater debt at the end may not even bother, despite their intelligence or passion. £7000 would put me off. Also your course could be very fulfilling and everything but your end job may pay a pitiful amount but starting with such a huge debt would be daunting.
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    (Original post by flipshot)
    Although there not linked to RPI or CPI.

    How else do you explain how they get the figures for the increase. There not a set percentage each year or a fixed amount like £100 a year.

    Plus in years where inflation has been higher they have gone up more than in years when it has been lower - like this year.
    In which case they aren't linked to inflation.

    Being an increase in the same order of magnitude isn't the same thing.

    Not that I can tell, but how can you know since you don't know when the 'inflation year' is to and from?
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    (Original post by Cafwin)
    The thought of the debt i'll have to pay when i leave actually terrifies me a little and I'll be doing a course partly funded by the NHS, so a person who have to pay back an even greater debt at the end may not even bother, despite their intelligence or passion. £7000 would put me off. Also your course could be very fulfilling and everything but your end job may pay a pitiful amount but starting with such a huge debt would be daunting.
    So why did student numbers increase after fees were introduced and again after topup fees came in?

    You cunningly forgot to answer who brought in fees :P smooth!
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    I think it's a good thing
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    (Original post by Broderss)
    Does it really matter? You'll still be able to afford it on your uni loan plus because more kids will avoid uni, as it will be £7k, the value of your degree will increase. Thus, I can only see it as a positive move.
    And employers value degrees based on how much you paid for them?

    Utter rubbish.
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    (Original post by Frontier)
    I think it's a good thing
    Any particular reason(s) why?

    (Original post by jumpingjesusholycow)
    And employers value degrees based on how much you paid for them?

    Utter rubbish.
    I think its more to do with the less people can go the more valuable the degree ends up being. Sort of like how a top uni will require AAA where as a crap one might offer CCC. Obviously less will be able to go to the top eventually making their degrees more "special" then the other university.
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    (Original post by DanD9)
    Any particular reason(s) why?
    I have given a few already, you are paying for what you get yourself rather than being subsidised by someone else.
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    (Original post by jumpingjesusholycow)
    And employers value degrees based on how much you paid for them?

    Utter rubbish.
    :facepalm:

    No. I said less people taking degrees increases the value for those who do have degrees. ffs have some common sense.
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    (Original post by Miahrose)
    I've read a lot of things about the Conservatives wanting to rise uni fees to £7000 a year if they get into power. If this plan actually goes ahead, I honestly don't know what I'll do. I'm in year 12 right now.

    A question though; if university fees are changed in your first year, so you've paid the £3.25kish for your course that year, is it fixed at that price for you until you finish your 3 year course?

    If it is fixed, my year might just make it in if the Conservatives come into power. Fingers crossed.
    If the quality of the teaching i should receive increases at a similar level, i honestly dont mind.
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    (Original post by Broderss)
    :facepalm:

    No. I said less people taking degrees increases the value for those who do have degrees. ffs have some common sense.
    Not necessarily, why should your value increase just because there's few applicants? The abundancy of choice increases, but pound for pound, if two people have equal degrees, the swing on 'how many applicants there were that year' makes no difference.

    and Jeez, calm down.
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    fees need to be increased to keep the system afloat, i mean i would rather pay a bit more but maintain a good standard of education or even better, than have budget cuts slice apart what in effect is one of the more important issues today. Anything up to about 10k i'd be happy to pay, anything over then its asking too much for poorer applicants. In essence i would rather have an expensive but good education than a cheap and rushed one.
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    (Original post by crazylemon)
    I have given a few already, you are paying for what you get yourself rather than being subsidised by someone else.
    Well isn't that the entire public school system? Funded by others, available to everyone.

    Also a grant is being subsidized, a loan isn't, its simply just borrowing money that they currently don't have. (and lets face it how many students can afford to pay for a uni degree without any sort of financial help?) When its paid back they will still have paid for the degree like everyone else albeit at a later date.
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    (Original post by DanD9)
    Well isn't that the entire public school system? Funded by others, available to everyone.

    Also a grant is being subsidized, a loan isn't, its simply just borrowing money that they currently don't have. (and lets face it how many students can afford to pay for a uni degree without any sort of financial help?) When its paid back they will still have paid for the degree like everyone else albeit at a later date.
    I have no problem with the loans system as is, increase it to the 7k/higher mark.

    Grants should be replaced with loans imo.
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    I would take the government to court if they put up course fees for those who have already starter their course. It would be a joke.

    However, labour or the cons will probably put up tution fees to cut public spending.

    So; cheers for that one bankers. You *****.
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    (Original post by DanD9)
    Well isn't that the entire public school system? Funded by others, available to everyone.

    Also a grant is being subsidized, a loan isn't, its simply just borrowing money that they currently don't have. (and lets face it how many students can afford to pay for a uni degree without any sort of financial help?) When its paid back they will still have paid for the degree like everyone else albeit at a later date.
    You are under the false assumption that the Govt have the money for tuition loans to lend. They don't. They borrow it and subsidise the loan rate.
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    (Original post by jumpingjesusholycow)
    Not necessarily, why should your value increase just because there's few applicants? The abundancy of choice increases, but pound for pound, if two people have equal degrees, the swing on 'how many applicants there were that year' makes no difference.

    and Jeez, calm down.
    Less people taking degrees increases the competition for employers to hire the best qualified people.

    Here's a graph:



    Hope that explains it, I really cannot be bothered.
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    (Original post by Roobagnall)
    I would take the government to court if they put up course fees for those who have already starter their course. It would be a joke.

    However, labour or the cons will probably put up tution fees to cut public spending.

    So; cheers for that one bankers. You *****.
    Another ill thought argument. Increasing tuition fees only cuts public spending if there is no increase in tuition fee loans. If loans are increased too public spending increases.
 
 
 
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