Turn on thread page Beta

Conservatives would rise uni fees to £7k? watch

    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by hypocriticaljap)
    You are under the false assumption that the Govt have the money for tuition loans to lend. They don't. They borrow it and subsidise the loan rate.
    Whether they have the money or not is their own problem, not the students. I'd imagine most students who take out a student loan fully pay it off as its pretty hard not to, they can't really live their life on exactly £14,999 a year now can they.

    Either way the loan is paid off, the government gets their money back and then some so it should be a win win situation but if the government can't do their job right and balance the budget then students shouldn't have to pay for such a mistake.

    (Original post by crazylemon)
    I have no problem with the loans system as is, increase it to the 7k/higher mark.

    Grants should be replaced with loans imo.
    I'd be fine if they increase the loan amount to £7k to pay for the course but how many people will want to get into £28k debt to get a degree which we all know doesn't even guarantee a job, let alone a well paying one.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by hypocriticaljap)
    Another ill thought argument. Increasing tuition fees only cuts public spending if there is no increase in tuition fee loans. If loans are increased too public spending increases.
    Well what an ill thought reply. They get the money back if they loan it you.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    I'm not sure how feasible increasing loans to meet increased fees would be.

    As I understand it, the government sells student debt on mass to a private company at a discounted rate due to the risk of non payment. If loans are increased, the amount of debt that isn't recovered will be significantly greater. % wise the government will recover less of its investment as the risk to the private investor will be greater. In effect raising fees and loans will have a similar effect to increasing government spending on education.

    If fees are increased I would imagine that the loan system will be reformed, resulting in students having to privately fund part of the fees, or alternatively, the terms of repayment will be revamped - possibly changing to a more standard loan payment system designed to ensure money is paid back in full over say 20 years.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Roobagnall)
    Well what an ill thought reply. They get the money back if they loan it you.
    Oh dear!
    I'll try and make it simple for you.
    You borrow money off HMG at RPI
    They borrow it at RPI + 2%
    Who makes up the difference?
    Answer - The taxpayer

    Comprende now?
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by DanD9)
    Whether they have the money or not is their own problem, not the students. I'd imagine most students who take out a student loan fully pay it off as its pretty hard not to, they can't really live their life on exactly £14,999 a year now can they.

    Either way the loan is paid off, the government gets their money back and then some so it should be a win win situation but if the government can't do their job right and balance the budget then students shouldn't have to pay for such a mistake.


    I'd be fine if they increase the loan amount to £7k to pay for the course but how many people will want to get into £28k debt to get a degree which we all know doesn't even guarantee a job, let alone a well paying one.
    The govt admit they will only ever get back 70% of the money loaned. So the tax payer is picking up 30% of bad debt.
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    What's the big fuss about tuition fees? Whether they're 3k or 7k, you'll still either take years to pay it back or get a job near home, pay them back quickly, then work your career from there.

    Interest rates paid on Student Loans are minute - barely noticeable once you start paying them back, and it pretty much just covers inflation really. Not only that, but the threshold for starting to pay them back means you can go out, work full time, and still not be obliged to pay them back. When you do pay them back, if you stick to the minimum payments, you'll not be paying much back on the loan at all, so it's not like it's leaving you skint really, in any way.

    And think what you get for your 7k a year. I'm paying £3225 per year at the moment, which works out about a fiver a lesson, a fiver a tutorial, or a tenner for a 2-hour lab. Now, I'm not being funny, but my tutorials are 1on1 or 1to10 people, my lectures are sometimes down to 1to10 and we get our fair share of lab assistants for lab sessions. If I consider this contact time alone, I reckon I'm getting cracking value for money.

    Then on top of the tuition, I'm playing for an incredible array of other services which both the University and the Students' Union offer. I haven't needed to go anywhere but the library for a book, awesome computing facilities within the department and in libraries, cheap cafes and food places, an excellent student bar with decent cider on tap, the only student-run theatre in the country, literally hundreds of clubs and societies, subsidised courses, plenty of chances to take up positions of responsibilities etc etc...

    For £3225 a year I don't really think I can go wrong here.
    Offline

    15
    i honestly can't see how i'm ever going to fully pay off the debt i'll have accumulated by the time i finish- 21,000 ish. my job prospects don't inlcude especially well paid positions so.....yeh. any money i save will not go towards paying off my debt, it'll go towards getting a house and car and everything else that i need to live.

    if the debt was even more than what im currently looking at, i would seriously question going. it's all very well for medicine students to sit back and say 'good', but for lots of people, they arn't heading towards people shovelling money up their bottoms once they graduate. 30 grand + of debt is just too much for some people, and i think a lot will be put off in the future.
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Broderss)
    Does it really matter? You'll still be able to afford it on your uni loan plus because more kids will avoid uni, as it will be £7k, the value of your degree will increase. Thus, I can only see it as a positive move.

    You really think this is going to lead to a reuction in uni students? Please...don't fool yourself. The student loan will still be more than payable, and anyone who drops out because of it will be immediately replaced by any of the thousands of people waiting to get in.
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Roobagnall)
    They get the money back if they loan it you.
    How?
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by James4d)
    You really think this is going to lead to a reuction in uni students? Please...don't fool yourself. The student loan will still be more than payable, and anyone who drops out because of it will be immediately replaced by any of the thousands of people waiting to get in.
    Believe me, some people will avoid it because of the cost if it ever does increase to that amount.

    And by 'people' I am referring to the kids at the not so good universities; ie rank 50 and above.
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Broderss)
    Less people taking degrees increases the competition for employers to hire the best qualified people.

    Here's a graph:



    Hope that explains it, I really cannot be bothered.

    If you take the value of a degree on its merit, then the rate of employability as a result of how many people took a degree that year is defunct.

    I am relentless (:
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by DanD9)
    Whether they have the money or not is their own problem, not the students. I'd imagine most students who take out a student loan fully pay it off as its pretty hard not to, they can't really live their life on exactly £14,999 a year now can they.
    How much do you think graduates earn?
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Roobagnall)
    So; cheers for that one bankers. You *****.
    It was going to happen anyway, 7-9k fees have been talked about since around 2006/07.
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by jumpingjesusholycow)
    If you take the value of a degree on its merit, then the rate of employability as a result of how many people took a degree that year is defunct.

    I am relentless (:
    Ok I give up! Yes, you're right!!

    :sleep:
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Broderss)
    Ok I give up! Yes, you're right!!

    :sleep:
    If I could teleport myself to your location, I'd give you a beer.
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by jumpingjesusholycow)
    If I could teleport myself to your location, I'd give you a beer.
    Thanks to the internet, we can!!

    :beer:
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Broderss)
    Believe me, some people will avoid it because of the cost if it ever does increase to that amount.

    And by 'people' I am referring to the kids at the not so good universities; ie rank 50 and above.
    Fair enough, it may drive people away, but that doesnt mean there will be less graduates. Degrees of those leaving uni will be worth what they are now, good or bad.

    A degree from a 'not so good' university isn't worth much these days anyway.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Ugh this depresses me. Our parents went to Uni on a grant however we may have to pay £7k a year? Can't they hold out for another three years at least
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by James4d)
    A degree from a 'not so good' university isn't worth much these days anyway.
    lol I know right it's pretty damn funny :rofl:
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Cafwin)
    By potentially raising tutition fees it completely undermines the process of making higher education equally available to everyone. Whoever comes into power will have to make education cuts but raising it to £7000 seems quite hypocritical.
    Sounds like a conservative move to redefine class and bring back elitism by making universities exclusive to the rich to me.
    Both the labour and tory parties will increase tuition fees after the general election. You also seem to have a pretty warped view of the tory party as it is they who first expanded in the university system in the early 90's.
 
 
 
Reply
Submit reply
Turn on thread page Beta
TSR Support Team

We have a brilliant team of more than 60 Support Team members looking after discussions on The Student Room, helping to make it a fun, safe and useful place to hang out.

This forum is supported by:
Updated: September 14, 2010
Poll
How are you feeling in the run-up to Results Day 2018?

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.