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Who is the most intelligent TSRian (pre-university)? watch

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    (Original post by hontoir)
    Seeing as mathematics is following a large set of rules, and all that needs to be done is to observe the said rules, then realistically you dont need to be intelligent to be good at maths. You just need to be well disciplined.
    More intelligent people will find it easier to learn/understand the rules. And to appreciate the maths enough to not drop it after school, I'd say you'd have to have some deeper understanding and appreciation of mathematics beyond the mechanical "learning the rules".

    The sort of person who comes up with something new in mathematics, and not just through a higher level of book knowledge/training, is the only one who could really be said to be intelligent with certainty. Their brain would simply have to work at a certain level for them to be able to do what they do, and I can't think of any other area where that is the case.
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    (Original post by schoolstudent)
    More intelligent people will find it easier to learn/understand the rules. And to appreciate the maths enough to not drop it after school, I'd say you'd have to have some deeper understanding and appreciation of mathematics beyond the mechanical "learning the rules".

    The sort of person who comes up with something new in mathematics, and not just through a higher level of book knowledge/training, is the only one who could really be said to be intelligent with certainty. Their brain would simply have to work at a certain level for them to be able to do what they do, and I can't think of any other area where that is the case.
    A computer runs on the principle of rules, and mathematics is 100% rules. There is nothing to deeper understand. Mathematics is one of the only hard and fast RIGHT or WRONG subjects, meaning it HAS to be 100% rules to give the 50/50 ratio.

    The sort of person who comes up with something new in mathematics would be similar to someone that comes up with something new in any department, they would be someone that thinks outside of the box, as everything within the box already exists. This again does not equate to greater intelligence. I suggest you re-analyse your variables.
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    (Original post by ozzyoscy)
    I rest my case.



    And the case is closed.

    Incidentally though, I've known many people who have had high grades in Maths, for example, and been very sub-standard at it. It takes them half a minute to figure out half of 300. Some of the dumbest people I know got have got a high or good grade in Maths.

    Your logic is flawed.
    So? Mental arithmetic isn't the sort of insight, understanding or reasoning I'm talking about. Did they go on to uni with maths? I agree that a gcse grade in it might not indicate maths ability, to keep performing at a consistently high level, and to appreciate it enough to take it to uni shows a certain level of intelligence.
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    I don't why you're still posting, your argument has been rebutted too logically. Checkmate.
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    (Original post by hontoir)
    A computer runs on the principle of rules, and mathematics is 100% rules. There is nothing to deeper understand. Mathematics is one of the only hard and fast RIGHT or WRONG subjects, meaning it HAS to be 100% rules to give the 50/50 ratio.

    The sort of person who comes up with something new in mathematics would be similar to someone that comes up with something new in any department, they would be someone that thinks outside of the box, as everything within the box already exists. This again does not equate to greater intelligence. I suggest you re-analyse your variables.
    so the successful mathematician is best from a raw "computer brain" point of view, and from a creative, out of the box point of view. what could be more intelligent? what is a better measure of intelligence than mathematical success then?
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    (Original post by ozzyoscy)
    I don't why you're still posting, your argument has been rebutted too logically. Checkmate.
    What subject do you study?
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    (Original post by schoolstudent)
    so the successful mathematician is best from a raw "computer brain" point of view, and from a creative, out of the box point of view. what could be more intelligent? what is a better measure of intelligence than mathematical success then?
    A guy that understands women?

    Spoiler:
    Show

    On a serious note, intelligence would be the measure of how a person grasps a situation, and seeming as the world is not completely definied by maths, I would say that someone who has a full understanding of maths COMBINED with physics/chemistry/biology/engineering would be the ULTIMATE intelligence measure.. but I would satisfy myself that ANY of these is of equal measure.. stop trying to big up a single department, especially as with the advent of the computer mathematicians are rather over shadowed by a quicker machine
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    (Original post by hontoir)
    A guy that understands women?


    On a serious note, intelligence would be the measure of how a person grasps a situation, and seeming as the world is not completely definied by maths, I would say that someone who has a full understanding of maths COMBINED with physics/chemistry/biology/engineering would be the ULTIMATE intelligence measure.. but I would satisfy myself that ANY of these is of equal measure.. stop trying to big up a single department, especially as with the advent of the computer mathematicians are rather over shadowed by a quicker machine
    but that's just extra knowledge and book time. it might be the ultimate understanding measure, but not intelligence measure. no matter how intelligent, it's not possible to derive the laws and facts of physics, chemistry and biology by pure thought like you could in mathematics. it's learning. and biology equal to maths?! biology is rote learning of facts and rules with little thought, to a far greater degree than mathematics. New pieces of mathematics come from pure complex thought and understanding.
    Someone who studies maths could do well in another science, but someone in another science couldn't necessarily do well in maths.

    though i agree that a biology student could be just as or more intelligent than a maths one, and it might just be that biology is what they like. but the fact that they study biology could never be used as evidence for any high level of intelligence...well if they never studied and did well anyway, that might suggest an amazing memory, so that's something. but from what I've seen of biology, the challenge is always the same: memorise a set of steps for some process, and it always comes down purely to memory.

    someone who puts in an average effort at a top university for maths and still does well must have a certain intelligence level: memory coupled with understanding and reasoning with complex ideas.
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    (Original post by schoolstudent)
    but that's just extra knowledge and book time. no matter how intelligent, it's not possible to derive the laws and facts of physics, chemistry and biology by pure thought like you could in mathematics. it's learning. and biology equal to maths?! biology is rote learning of facts and rules with little thought, to a far greater degree than mathematics. New pieces of mathematics come from pure complex thought and understanding.
    Haha oh really?? I would assume you have never met an engineer then?

    And new pieces of mathematics encapsulate older pieces, so you are therefore using older rules. Once a certain level of knowledge has been obtained you cannot reinvent the wheel.

    I would assume that you are studying mathematics??
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    let face it.. the ONLY intelligent thing about mathematics is knowing to take it. Mathematics is a HARD subject (im not disputing that) but once the core fundamentals are learnt, and the rules are always obeyed it becomes easy in comparison.
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    (Original post by hontoir)
    Haha oh really?? I would assume you have never met an engineer then?

    And new pieces of mathematics encapsulate older pieces, so you are therefore using older rules. Once a certain level of knowledge has been obtained you cannot reinvent the wheel.

    I would assume that you are studying mathematics??
    You could use different methods to get to the same facts that comprise a certain level of knowledge of mathematics, but the facts are facts, and so of course you can't reinvent them. the known facts are there, but you can be creative in how you link them. there are also new facts to be found.
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    Idiots.

    Which leads the only other option: Myself, as a prime candidate.
 
 
 
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