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Hindu wins right to be cremated on open-air funeral pyre Watch

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    Considering the fact that like a lot of piles of dead, possibly infected, animal carcasses were burned in open countryside a few years ago (due to the whole foot & mouth thing)..... this really doesn't seem like a problem. Surely as far as healthy & safety goes... 1 presumably not contagiously diseased human body is better than the X amount of animals.

    Its also really common for ashes to be scattered.
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    thats how i want to go too =)
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    (Original post by 4G_dollars)
    No, Lets think about the health and safety of individuals. Imagine how many other bodies are going to be burning, stinking the air with body flesh...
    Apparently it smells like pork.
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    (Original post by 4G_dollars)
    It might be different. You don't know. Anyway he has a valid point. Would you allow a burning body flesh in your back garden literally? Would you like the smell or would you feel comfortable? It is stinking the atmosphere.
    If that's the case then I wouldn't have any issues with it if it was done in a certain area that preferably wasn't residential or near people's homes.
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    The Anteyeshti Samkara (Funeral rite) is the 16th and final major rite that Hindu’s must perform (or have performed on their behalf). An orthodox/ traditional Hindu is unlikely to consider the prevalent processes in Crematoriums as entirely suitable. This is because these processes do not lend itself to traditional Antheyshi samkara principles, which are complex and symbolic.
    As regards concerns raised on this thread: First of all, you must understand that the objective of the ceremony is to ensure that the body which, according to tradition, consists of five elements -Prithvi (Earth), Jala (Water), Agni (Fire), Vayu (Air) and Akasha (ether)) is returned to these basic tatvas. This is achieved through the performance of specific rites, modification of which may have detrimental Karmic consequences.
    Why can’t these rites be performed in a crematorium?:
    (1) Hindu belief dictates that the upper body is distinct from the lower body – the waist being a line of demarcation. The lower body reflects the Karmas performed in this life and the upper symbolises Karmas to be performed after death. This means ash from the Head and the upper body (Asti) is treated differently to that from the lower body.
    (2) Cardinal Directions have enormous significance - the head must face south – the south being the direction of Death.
    (3) The funeral pyre is constructed according to specific geometries and rites dictated by Ashvalayana Grihya sutras
    (4) The elder son must circumvent the body three times, starting from the head (carrying an earthen ware pot which he must drop and break on the floor)
    (5) The elder son must light a log as well as the fire on four sides of the body whilst priests perform mantras to Agni (The God of Fire).
    (6) Three days after these rites the ash from the lower body is collected first, then the upper body and finally the head. It is this Asti which is immersed in the Ganges or another sacred river.
    In my view, it is more or less impossible to adhere to the dictates of the traditions or perform any of these rites in a satisfactory manner at a traditional crematorium.
    As regards smells – you must understand that the body is covered with logs including sandal wood and copiously sprinkled with havan samagrahi (a concoction of herbs, Guggal (Commiphora Mukul), Ashtagandha (a concoction of herbs),Tulsi (Holy Basil – Ocimum Tenuiflorum), Ghee. It is also covered with incense and flowers – jasmine, marigolds and so forth. - In my experience the overwhelming smell is one of incense and sandalwood. In any case the ceremony must not be performed in the “backyard of some one’s home” but in an area chosen and sanctified for the purpose and at a suitable distance away from residential areas.
    Hindu’s have traditionally accepted the limitations imposed by Law and sought to mitigate the Karmic consequences through the performance of other rites. The recent ruling means that (as long as an enclosure is built for the purpose) Hindus can perform rites according to tradition – I cannot foresee why this would have an impact (deleterious or otherwise) on anyone else.
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    (Original post by Padmapada_Shishya)
    The Anteyeshti Samkara (Funeral rite) is the 16th and final major rite that Hindu’s must perform (or have performed on their behalf). An orthodox/ traditional Hindu is unlikely to consider the prevalent processes in Crematoriums as entirely suitable. This is because these processes do not lend itself to traditional Antheyshi samkara principles, which are complex and symbolic.
    As regards concerns raised on this thread: First of all, you must understand that the objective of the ceremony is to ensure that the body which, according to tradition, consists of five elements -Prithvi (Earth), Jala (Water), Agni (Fire), Vayu (Air) and Akasha (ether)) is returned to these basic tatvas. This is achieved through the performance of specific rites, modification of which may have detrimental Karmic consequences.
    Why can’t these rites be performed in a crematorium?:
    (1) Hindu belief dictates that the upper body is distinct from the lower body – the waist being a line of demarcation. The lower body reflects the Karmas performed in this life and the upper symbolises Karmas to be performed after death. This means ash from the Head and the upper body (Asti) is treated differently to that from the lower body.
    (2) Cardinal Directions have enormous significance - the head must face south – the south being the direction of Death.
    (3) The funeral pyre is constructed according to specific geometries and rites dictated by Ashvalayana Grihya sutras
    (4) The elder son must circumvent the body three times, starting from the head (carrying an earthen ware pot which he must drop and break on the floor)
    (5) The elder son must light a log as well as the fire on four sides of the body whilst priests perform mantras to Agni (The God of Fire).
    (6) Three days after these rites the ash from the lower body is collected first, then the upper body and finally the head. It is this Asti which is immersed in the Ganges or another sacred river.
    In my view, it is more or less impossible to adhere to the dictates of the traditions or perform any of these rites in a satisfactory manner at a traditional crematorium.
    As regards smells – you must understand that the body is covered with logs including sandal wood and copiously sprinkled with havan samagrahi (a concoction of herbs, Guggal (Commiphora Mukul), Ashtagandha (a concoction of herbs),Tulsi (Holy Basil – Ocimum Tenuiflorum), Ghee. It is also covered with incense and flowers – jasmine, marigolds and so forth. - In my experience the overwhelming smell is one of incense and sandalwood. In any case the ceremony must not be performed in the “backyard of some one’s home” but in an area chosen and sanctified for the purpose and at a suitable distance away from residential areas.
    Hindu’s have traditionally accepted the limitations imposed by Law and sought to mitigate the Karmic consequences through the performance of other rites. The recent ruling means that (as long as an enclosure is built for the purpose) Hindus can perform rites according to tradition – I cannot foresee why this would have an impact (deleterious or otherwise) on anyone else.
    Wow,interesting .......
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    (Original post by gloved_hand)
    You on the other hand are a bigoted racist idiot and are therefore unacceptable. :facepalm:
    Because you said so? It's all a matter of opinions, yours is no more valid than mine.
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    (Original post by FinishHim!)
    It's a romantic way to go, but is it suitable in a secular, modern society?
    i wish i could go out like that - thats the way i want to be cremated
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    (Original post by Cesare Borgia)
    Because you said so? It's all a matter of opinions, yours is no more valid than mine.
    I think most would agree that arguing that Italian culture is acceptable because the people there are white, and Indian culture is unacceptable because the people there aren't, is the pretty much the definition of racism.
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    (Original post by gloved_hand)
    I think most would agree that arguing that Italian culture is acceptable because the people there are white, and Indian culture is unacceptable because the people there aren't, is the pretty much the definition of racism.
    The key point was actually Christianity, the reference to race is just indicative of similarity.
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    (Original post by Cesare Borgia)
    The key point was actually Christianity, the reference to race is just indicative of similarity.
    "The name in question is Italian, a white, christian society, and is therefore acceptable."

    Yeah right, nice attempt to save yourself there. You mentioned white first and christian second. If the point was about being Christian and you mentioned Christianity, then what is the point of mentioning race at all? There's millions of black, Asian and oriental Christians in the world, so why is Christianity supposed to be synonymous with being white anyway?
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    (Original post by gloved_hand)
    "The name in question is Italian, a white, christian society, and is therefore acceptable."

    Yeah right, nice attempt to save yourself there. You mentioned white first and christian second. If the point was about being Christian and you mentioned Christianity, then what is the point of mentioning race at all? There's millions of black, Asian and oriental Christians in the world, so why is Christianity supposed to be synonymous with being white anyway?
    Because White European culture developed around Christianity in a way unlike Africa or the Far East etc.
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    Excellent News! i really like how he fought this case with Dignity, Jai Hind!
 
 
 
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