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    You're a little worried about the social side? You're in London!! Don't think it can really get much better. I'm choosing to go into Ramsay Halls, since it's the biggest, close to UCL and I believe a great oppurtunity to meet as many people as possible. And you're sure to meet peple who are up for going out.

    All my friends who are already at UCL don't really go the SU. Mainly because there are just so many other bars and clubs.

    I'm going to be an SSEES student too. At first I was a little pessimistic since it's rather separate from UCL and has its own societies etc. But it's turned into a positive for me, another oppurtunity to meet even more people from your whole department rather than just your course.

    As for post first year, most people move into houses in Camden
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    Pros : It's in London
    Cons : It's in London..
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    I personally think the pros out weigh the cons, so don't be so worried.
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    Agreed with the above on social side. You may not be spending so much time at the SU, unless a society has booked one of the bars at the Union. A lot of people go to The Rocket around Kings X, and there a few nice cheap student nights at the bars in Greek Street and Soho.

    Second year, and often final year housing usually are houses shared amongst those you've met at hall or your courses. ULU has a helpful housing section with names of housing agents to help. Most of us had to live in Zone 3, but seeing as how transport costs are rising it would be useful to invest in Zone 2.

    SSEES takes pride in its separate history before UCL. If you are really keen on your subject you'll have a great time, the students there are really passionate. There is a known distinction in SSEES History and Economics vs. UCL History and Economics ( the former is easier to pass in economics) amongst the students. But this shouldn't be a problem in employment as long as you stick to your area, plenty of SSEESers do get employed in consultancies,I-banks, recruitment agencies. It'll be fun.
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    (Original post by WaltzvWendt)
    Agreed with the above on social side. You may not be spending so much time at the SU, unless a society has booked one of the bars at the Union. A lot of people go to The Rocket around Kings X, and there a few nice cheap student nights at the bars in Greek Street and Soho.

    Second year, and often final year housing usually are houses shared amongst those you've met at hall or your courses. ULU has a helpful housing section with names of housing agents to help. Most of us had to live in Zone 3, but seeing as how transport costs are rising it would be useful to invest in Zone 2.

    SSEES takes pride in its separate history before UCL. If you are really keen on your subject you'll have a great time, the students there are really passionate. There is a known distinction in SSEES History and Economics vs. UCL History and Economics ( the former is easier to pass in economics) amongst the students. But this shouldn't be a problem in employment as long as you stick to your area, plenty of SSEESers do get employed in consultancies,I-banks, recruitment agencies. It'll be fun.
    Ok cool, i'm History, and the thing is i'm considering Postgrad for Law. Would it effect my application to places such as Oxbridge at all?
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    (Original post by Max Hinks)
    Ok cool, i'm History, and the thing is i'm considering Postgrad for Law. Would it effect my application to places such as Oxbridge at all?
    Well, I don't know how straightforward you want to pursue law immediately. My former housemate was a SSEES History student and got into Oxford for his MSc, another friend also at SSEES got into the MPhil. But these were in the Russian and East European Studies department (REES). My housemate after his MSc in REES was able to do a conversion course at BPP Law after his Oxford experience. Oxford looks favorably on SSEES specialized courses, but for social science postgrads. For a postgrad law in Oxford, I can't really say what they would make of SSEES BA. The conventional route are conversion courses elsewhere.
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    Con
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    (Original post by thethinker)
    Con
    :hand: Doesn't automatically mean that you'll get blown up.
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    (Original post by Max Hinks)
    Ok cool, i'm History, and the thing is i'm considering Postgrad for Law. Would it effect my application to places such as Oxbridge at all?
    You can't apply postgrad for law anywhere without having taken an undergraduate law degree. You can apply for a senior status law degree - the undergraduate degree; taken in two years, not three, but the costs are very high and second undergrad degrees get no grants/loans etc.
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    (Original post by WaltzvWendt)
    Well, I don't know how straightforward you want to pursue law immediately. My former housemate was a SSEES History student and got into Oxford for his MSc, another friend also at SSEES got into the MPhil. But these were in the Russian and East European Studies department (REES). My housemate after his MSc in REES was able to do a conversion course at BPP Law after his Oxford experience. Oxford looks favorably on SSEES specialized courses, but for social science postgrads. For a postgrad law in Oxford, I can't really say what they would make of SSEES BA. The conventional route are conversion courses elsewhere.
    Sorry, I should have made my self clearer. I'm talking about conversion courses. Is it not a standard post grad application?
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    (Original post by Max Hinks)
    Sorry, I should have made my self clearer. I'm talking about conversion courses. Is it not a standard post grad application?
    Conversion courses aren't really standard postgrad degrees, more like graduate diplomas. The GDL and other conversion courses are usually taught in specialized schools. One of the users above gives a good explanation. I haven't heard of any offered by Oxford or Cambridge, there is one offered at Oxford Brookes. The other schools I've heard of offering it are The College of Law and BPP Law School.
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    (Original post by Max Hinks)
    Sorry, I should have made my self clearer. I'm talking about conversion courses. Is it not a standard post grad application?
    As I said, you can't apply postgrad for law anywhere unless you have a law degree. The conversion course is not a degree; it's a conversion course and mostly offered through private institutions (which are generally better (e.g. BPP, CoL) than the newer universities which offer them).
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    (Original post by WaltzvWendt)
    Conversion courses aren't really standard postgrad degrees, more like graduate diplomas. The GDL and other conversion courses are usually taught in specialized schools. One of the users above gives a good explanation. I haven't heard of any offered by Oxford or Cambridge, there is one offered at Oxford Brookes. The other schools I've heard of offering it are The College of Law and BPP Law School.
    Oh right post 30 seconds before me why don't you?
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    (Original post by TerryTerry)
    As I said, you can't apply postgrad for law anywhere unless you have a law degree. The conversion course is not a degree; it's a conversion course and mostly offered through private institutions (which are generally better (e.g. BPP, CoL) than the newer universities which offer them).
    Ah ok, thanks. Can I get student finance for these?
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    (Original post by TerryTerry)
    Oh right post 30 seconds before me why don't you?
    Gave you credit :p: . Plus, fast fingers . Don't come out doing 2 dissertations and countless essays too close to the deadline for nothing!
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    (Original post by Max Hinks)
    Ah ok, thanks. Can I get student finance for these?
    Short answer, no.

    Long answer:

    a) if you get a TC - a training contract - with a law firm, they will pay it for you.

    b) And banks will give you big loans e.g. natwest up to £25000. But the interest rate is pretty poor.

    Disclaimer: I did a law degree, I haven't done the GDL, always check your information.
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    (Original post by TerryTerry)
    You can't apply postgrad for law anywhere without having taken an undergraduate law degree. You can apply for a senior status law degree - the undergraduate degree; taken in two years, not three, but the costs are very high and second undergrad degrees get no grants/loans etc.
    Do you know how much a two year law course would cost?
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    (Original post by WaltzvWendt)
    Gave you credit :p: . Plus, fast fingers . Don't come out doing 2 dissertations and countless essays too close to the deadline for nothing!
    That and my internet connection is on the fritz
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    (Original post by TerryTerry)
    Short answer, no.

    Long answer:

    a) if you get a TC - a training contract - with a law firm, they will pay it for you.

    b) And banks will give you big loans e.g. natwest up to £25000. But the interest rate is pretty poor.

    Disclaimer: I did a law degree, I haven't done the GDL, always check your information.
    Sorry for the repeated questions. As a UCL History student, how easy would it be for me to get a training contract with a law firm?
 
 
 
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