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"mental illnesses created by excessive web use" watch

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    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencete...reatments.html

    So what do you guys think about this?

    I'm a bit confused to tell the truth, it says that using the net causes you to flick through pages more, which I can kind of see a link, however the daily mail then hysterically writes about mental illnesses being "created" by using the net too much...yet I find nothing in the article that points to this (saving the bit near the end which even then isn't exactly what they claimed). So, more bull**** or do they have a point?
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    well im screwed then.
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    Just because I get my jollies from watching peoples' deaths on the internet doesn't mean I have a mental illness. Now the voices...
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    I'm an internet addict, but I don't skip through physical books as easily as I skip through electronic copies of journal articles. I tend to lose concentration towards the end of a long textbook chapter, but I suspect that's natural.

    A lot of academic textbooks and papers just pad articles incessantly, anyway. I think the ability to efficiently glean data and information is an asset, not a curse.
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    Reading the Daily Mail causes cancer.
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    (Original post by DailyMail)
    Net generation: Children are loosing their mental capacity due to Internet overload
    I stopped there.
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    Hmmm...
    Net generation: Children are loosing their mental capacity due to Internet overload
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    ohhhh ok, this article is from the daily mail.

    that says it all.
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    I wouldn't write it off just because it's the Daily Mail.

    It makes sense - people that use the web excessively (trust me, you'll find a lot of them on here) aren't connecting with people normally. They probably never leave their house, or work, or mix with people on a normal social level.
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    (Original post by Lindsey123)
    Reading the Daily Mail causes cancer.
    It's my guilty pleasure. :o: :p:
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    its been corrected already :O
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    Every new technology that becomes prevalent attracts scaremongers. They're no different to the nutters that told people that their atoms would fly apart if they went on trains too often.
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    This was on the BBC a while back, as usual the Daily Mail has twisted it. The research merely links the mental illness and large amounts of internet use, and does not say one causes the other but specifically says people with mental illness may spend more time on the internet as they don't want to spend time with others.
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    More comedy gold from the Daily Mail.
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    (Original post by L i b)
    Every new technology that becomes prevalent attracts scaremongers. They're no different to the nutters that told people that their atoms would fly apart if they went on trains too often.
    Apparently people said similar things about books when they first started become widely available. They thought kids would just sit at home reading books all day and not get any exercise, or that they might read something that will corrupt their minds.
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    What a bitty, incoherent article riddled with leaps-of-faith logic. Unsurprising considering the source.
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    (Original post by Psyk)
    Apparently people said similar things about books when they first started become widely available. They thought kids would just sit at home reading books all day and not get any exercise, or that they might read something that will corrupt their minds.
    Yeah, and to be fair it took centuries before that prophecy was fulfilled with the creation of porn magazines.
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    The original research showed there was a correlation - no causality was suggested. That's the Daily Mail for you though. :rolleyes:
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    (Original post by L i b)
    Yeah, and to be fair it took centuries before that prophecy was fulfilled with the creation of porn magazines.
    Good point

    On a related subject, I find thanks to the Internet I do have difficulty watching a single porn video without getting bored. On a computer it's so easy to flick through them, so I just watch the highlights so to speak:p: I mean if I've see one minute of thrusting, why bother watching another 10 minutes of it? Might as well flick to the next position change.
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    (Original post by Sabertooth)
    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencete...reatments.html

    So what do you guys think about this?

    I'm a bit confused to tell the truth, it says that using the net causes you to flick through pages more, which I can kind of see a link, however the daily mail then hysterically writes about mental illnesses being "created" by using the net too much...yet I find nothing in the article that points to this (saving the bit near the end which even then isn't exactly what they claimed). So, more bull**** or do they have a point?
    you could just as easily argue that the net doesnt cause depression, rather that people who are already depressed are more likely to use the internet for longer time periods
 
 
 
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