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"mental illnesses created by excessive web use" watch

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    (Original post by Hooovan*)
    ohhhh ok, this article is from the daily mail.

    that says it all.
    WTF? Most news stories in the daily mail are also reported in other papers/news websites....pretentious much????
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    (Original post by WEB)
    you could just as easily argue that the net doesnt cause depression, rather that people who are already depressed are more likely to use the internet for longer time periods
    Indeed.

    http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/8493149.stm
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    *** hoc fallacy; couldn't care less.
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    Initial findings from 100 volunteers who were asked a series of questions on a computer revealed that most 12 to 18-year-olds gave their answers after looking at half the number of web pages and only one-sixth of the time viewing the information than their elders
    So... did they get the answers right? I think it's pretty obvious teens who use the web more than their 'elders' would be more adept at finding information on a web page in less time, as they generally know how a web page might be laid out and will know where to look first. Particularly as the teens who took part are all about the age where they'd be using the internet a lot for studying.

    Perhaps using the web makes you faster at rejecting bad information and reading only what you need, like skim reading in a book.

    I highly doubt brains are [already] being 'rewired' I mean, how long has the internet been around and used to such a large degree?
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    I like how no journalist is placing their names on the article, just "daily mail reporter".
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    (Original post by Aphotic Cosmos)
    I'm an internet addict, but I don't skip through physical books as easily as I skip through electronic copies of journal articles. I tend to lose concentration towards the end of a long textbook chapter, but I suspect that's natural.

    A lot of academic textbooks and papers just pad articles incessantly, anyway. I think the ability to efficiently glean data and information is an asset, not a curse.
    Sure you're not just in denial that there could be adverse problems as a result of such addiction? Since when was addiction healthy? Why is padding out articles unnecessary? Perhaps that attitude is the exact thing to be concerned about?

    It's impossible to tell if one's own brain really has been "rewired", I think deeper research is needed. However my concentration is sapped when I think of other things I could be doing.

    I can read long books ok, but admittedly, I did not really start using the internet until I was ~15.:dontknow: If anything, I think that internet access has enhanced my critical thinking skills... however I find that alot of internet articles are too short for my liking :stomp:
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    (Original post by Liquidus Zeromus)
    Sure you're not just in denial that there could be adverse problems as a result of such addiction? Since when was addiction healthy? Why is padding out articles unnecessary? Perhaps that attitude is the exact thing to be concerned about?

    It's impossible to tell if one's own brain really has been "rewired", I think deeper research is needed. However my concentration is sapped when I think of other things I could be doing.

    I can read long books ok, but admittedly, I did not really start using the internet until I was ~15.:dontknow: If anything, I think that internet access has enhanced my critical thinking skills... however I find that alot of internet articles are too short for my liking :stomp:
    I'm not in denial! YOU'RE IN DENIAL!

    GTFO!

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    (Original post by Aphotic Cosmos)
    I'm not in denial! YOU'RE IN DENIAL!

    GTFO!

    :pee::rip:
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    (Original post by Onychophagia)
    The original research showed there was a correlation - no causality was suggested. That's the Daily Mail for you though. :rolleyes:
    Love it when they do that.

    "So yeah, my graph of this factor and this other factor have an inverse correlation....look at the facts people! It's obvious!"
    along with
    "SCORE! Statistics! Now I can sensationalise something our readers fear and don't understand! "
    are my main ideas as to how the daily mail is written.
    That along with paedophile stories and sex scandals.
 
 
 
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