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    Hi guys, Taylor here.

    I'm currently 15 (Year 11) and I'm taking my GCSEs in the summer. Since passing a classic car garage in Cornwall a few summers ago I became infactuated with classic cars. My obsession tended to veer towards the British manufacturers (MG, Austin, Triumph) and especially towards the good ol' Mini.

    After my parents purchasing various classic car books, magazines, and even a dog-eared Haynes Manual for an Austin Mini for birthdays and the like, I am yearning for a car of my own. After glancing through this subsection of the forum for a few days I noticed that quite a few projects are often undertaken by the younger of the demographic, and with my tendency to hoard money (also know as saving ), I have decided that I really want to do it as well.

    So, with my mum behind the idea, believing that it would give me some useful skills, I am yet to discuss the idea with my dad. My dad, being in the Royal Navy and the Fire Brigade for all of his life, is quite a practical man. He holds a HGV licence, with required him to dismantle and re assemble a lorry engine. He also has done various DIY repairs and maintenance to previous cars (owning cars such as Austin Minis, MG Bs, Capris, and a Jensen Healey). I am yet to really know the depth to his skill, but I think he's at least slightly more skilled that the average motorist.

    So the problem is: the age factor. Trying to avoid the cliche " I may be young, but I'm mature for my age", I have to say I really feel ready to dive in and get fixin'. So from what I've filled you guys in on through the course of this admittedly tiring and confessional essay, the question is:

    For under a £1000, what classic should I go for (preferably a reasonably practical first car, that I could restore and maintain easily)?

    I think I could persuade my 'rents to either let me buy it after the GCSEs, or buy it together as a part birthday present (in June).
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    You could get a rough Beetle (VW) for £1k. I started off with a £520 rotter and have spent ridiculous numbers of hours restoring it since (after 3 years of driving it first).

    Other alternatives would include the Morris Minor (which are excellent cars) and other things such as Hillman Imps or DAF Variomatics if you don't want to follow the crowd.

    To be honest, almost anything tax exempt won't be too complicated.

    Even my 1970 Rover V8's most complicated parts are the servo brakes and power steering. And not many 70s cars have either of those things...
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    Seconded, i started on a Series 2a landrover, then beetle (which i still have), then mgb gt
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    Just whatever you buy, ensure the bodywork is in good condition and there is no rust, etc.

    Mechanical problems are cheap to fix, but bodywork is REALLY expensive!
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    (Original post by gbduo)
    Just whatever you buy, ensure the bodywork is in good condition and there is no rust, etc.

    Mechanical problems are cheap to fix, but bodywork is REALLY expensive!
    ^This^

    I would say go for a beetle but then I am slightly bias
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    I know it's not a true 70s classic, but restoring a 1.9 205 GTi would be my choice. Very easy to learn, many parts available and heads still look. You have to get it in grey to start off with.
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    2cvs are getting expensive but incredibly easy to work on.

    Beetles don't really do anything for me but you could go down that route if you really want. I would be more tempted to go morris minor way if you can find something cheap, or perhaps just get ebay to list only pre 1980, or pre 1970 cars and see what takes your fancy.
 
 
 
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