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    Hi everyone,

    Could anyone who has taken an AS or A2 Level language in the past offer any generaly advice to students currently undertaking A-Level languages?

    e.g. - would you do anything different if you had 2 do it all over again, for example ur method of study, note taking etc


    Any comments appreciated


    Thanks in advance
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    I'm happy to answer any questions about A Level Languages (AQA French in particular) but I can't think of any specific advice atm :erm:
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    Did A-Level French and got an A (before the introduced A*s). There's not much advice that can be given. If you didn't do any work for GCSE you're pretty screwed. It's all about learning the grammar and more specialised vocabulary, working on your conversation skills and things along those lines.

    You don't really need to take notes except for new words and phrases though. I had a little blue book that I recorded those things in. That's pretty much it. My teacher gave us 5 quite complicated phrases per day to translate, they got in all of the tenses and confusing grammar so we got to see how the grammar works, what we were doing wrong and how to correct it. We also did a 2 page translation once per week from an A-Level text book (from English into French) and a literature essay (in French) once every two weeks or so.

    It depends on the teacher you get too, I suppose. My teacher was fantastic, didn't feel like learning at all but everyone came out with As, Bs and 2 Cs out of a class of 18 or so. We only spoke French in class and had a 35 minute conversation class twice a week with French assistants. 1 or 2 people per class so you couldn't hide, you had to speak.

    My only advice would be do at least something everyday. You never know when the word for eggtimer will come in useful, and you'll find your conversation ability will sky-rocket (unless you fancy the French assistant and get easily tongue-tied :s), especially if you understand the grammar at the same time.
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    Okay I am A2 German'er' atm

    Vocabulary, phrases and grammar. They should be the bain of your life if you want to aim high.

    That's it in a nutshell.

    When you do your homework, take note of where you make constant mistakes and improve; don't waste time learning grammar you already know.
    Listen to your language's radio station. When it gets closer to the exam, ask your teacher for past paper CD's/Tapes and note down vocabulary/phrases that keep popping up/that you don't know.
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    My only advice would be do at least something everyday. You never know when the word for eggtimer will come in useful, and you'll find your conversation ability will sky-rocket (unless you fancy the French assistant and get easily tongue-tied :s), especially if you understand the grammar at the same time.
    This. For vocab learning, 10 to 15 minutes per language per day is all you need, and it is very much worth it. Get one of those A-Level vocab books like Mot a Mot for French, Wort fur Wort for German or Palabra por Palabra for Spanish, etc to help you out and have a notebook to write new words down in. Then, provided you do your schoolwork and a bit of grammar you should be fine. A bit of watching foreign news over lunch works great as well for the listening paper.

    And see if your school does exchanges! This is something I really regret not doing when I was at school. A-Level can seem very far removed from the real world, but when you're put in a real situation it is very satisfying to be able to make yourself understood.
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    I did A level Spanish if you want any advice on that. At the moment it is late and I can't think of anything other than what other people have said
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    Don't piss about expecting it to be alright. Don't piss about; actually revise all your grammar. If in an exam you aren't certain of a word/tense/grammar point; don't write it down. Take the full time allowed for the listening part of the exam (Edexcel). Don't have a 15 minute silence in your speaking test when your mind goes blank.

    That is all for now.
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    I' doing French for A2 after getting an A at AS last year.
    I agree with all of the above advice and the only other thing I'd suggest is to make sure that you speak and listen to french as often as you can!
    My teacher encourages me to listen to French radio online as often as possible and even though you may not understand 100% of it, it really gets your ear attuned to the language it sounds a bit sad I know, but it's easy enough whilst you're on TSR or facebook etcc
    Haha, good luck x
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    I'm taking A2 WJEC German. My tips:

    • Start learning the grammar from day 1. Get a decent grammar workbook with loads of questions and just keep at it
    • Do a little bit of vocab learning a day and write down and learn any new vocab from classes. Also learn loads of essay phrases like 'I am horrified that', 'I think it's important that' etc
    • If you have speaking lessons, speak German in them, do NOT speak English/go off track
    • WJEC German - for the essay, answer the essay question, e.g. if the essay is 'people who don't smoke etc are happier', KEEP referring back to how that makes them happier or not. Also, make sure you know your verb tenses inside-out for this.
 
 
 
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