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    Hi all

    this question to me seems as if they have not given you enough information to do it
    i'm so confused!

    An experiment was set up to determine the wavelength and frequency of a microwave. It was determined that there was a distance of 1.2cm between each antinode on the wave.

    Calculate:

    a) The wavelength
    b) The frequency


    a) my answer - 1.2cm
    b) ?????


    Thanks
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    Speed of light: 3 x 10^8

    frequency = speed/wavelength
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    All EM waves travel at the speed of light?
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    (Original post by Coke Or Pepsi)
    All EM waves travel at the speed of light?
    Yep 299792458m/s to be approx. xD
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    (Original post by Coke Or Pepsi)
    Hi all

    this question to me seems as if they have not given you enough information to do it
    i'm so confused!

    An experiment was set up to determine the wavelength and frequency of a microwave. It was determined that there was a distance of 1.2cm between each antinode on the wave.

    Calculate:

    a) The wavelength
    b) The frequency


    a) my answer - 1.2cm
    b) ?????


    Thanks
    We know distance between a node-node or an anti-node to an anti-node is : Lamda/4 = 1.2 x10^-3 so get the lamda value, then using c= f(lamda) get your frequency value.
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    If there is an antinode then isn't this a Standing Wave, where the separation of each antinode is HALF a wavelength so the wavelength would be twice the separation?
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    (Original post by ibysaiyan)
    We know distance between a node-node or an anti-node to an anti-node is : Lamda/4 = 1.2 x10^-3 so get the lamda value, then using c= f(lamda) get your frequency value.
    Why would it be that?
    You don't know anything about the number of nodes or the original length to be able to do anything with harmonics etc. to figure out lamda.

    I'm so confused now.

    I thought an antinode was just the amplitude.
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    (Original post by Coke Or Pepsi)
    Why would it be that?
    You don't know anything about the number of nodes or the original length to be able to do anything with harmonics etc. to figure out lamda.

    I'm so confused now.

    I thought an antinode was just the amplitude.
    Your question
    An experiment was set up to determine the wavelength and frequency of a microwave. It was determined that there was a distance of 1.2cm between each antinode on the wave.
    is not very clear.
    Is that exactly as it is in the book?

    Normally, any mention of nodes and antinodes refers to standing waves.
    If that is the case, then the distance between two nodes or two antinodes is half a wavelength.
    For normal travelling (sine) waves, the distance between two troughs or two crests is one wavelength.
    I suspect the question is about some sort of standing wave pattern.
    In which case, GingerGoat is correct.
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    (Original post by Stonebridge)
    Your question

    is not very clear.
    Is that exactly as it is in the book?

    Normally, any mention of nodes and antinodes refers to standing waves.
    If that is the case, then the distance between two nodes or two antinodes is half a wavelength.
    For normal travelling (sine) waves, the distance between two troughs or two crests is one wavelength.
    I suspect the question is about some sort of standing wave pattern.
    In which case, GingerGoat is correct.
    So in standing waves the distance between two nodes/antinodes is half a wavelength? Does this mean that the distance between an antinode and a node is one full wavelength?
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    (Original post by Coke Or Pepsi)
    So in standing waves the distance between two nodes/antinodes is half a wavelength? Does this mean that the distance between an antinode and a node is one full wavelength?
    No it's a quarter. This diagram makes it clearer.
    Top wave is a standing wave
    Bottom wave is a travelling wave
 
 
 
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