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    Hi, I was just wondering if anyone out there had studied either of these two languages and could tell me about their courses. I was also wondering how difficult they are in comparison to say A levels in other subjects as I have seen on the internet that quite a large proportion of people go on to get high grades at GCSE and A Level and quite a successful rate in going to Oxford! Are they interesting to study? Also I have seen that quite a few people usually do both Latin and Greek - is there similarity between the two...also classical civilisation? Any information would be welcomed...
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    (Original post by mjf)
    Hi, I was just wondering if anyone out there had studied either of these two languages and could tell me about their courses. I was also wondering how difficult they are in comparison to say A levels in other subjects as I have seen on the internet that quite a large proportion of people go on to get high grades at GCSE and A Level and quite a successful rate in going to Oxford! Are they interesting to study? Also I have seen that quite a few people usually do both Latin and Greek - is there similarity between the two...also classical civilisation? Any information would be welcomed...
    Well I did latin for AS...was going to continue it to A2 but the options at my school didn't permit me to. Greek isn't offered here. Quite a few people do classical civilisation. Classical civ involves studying the texts from the same time period as Latin/greek (ok..ish) but doesn't involve any knowledge of the language. Everything you read is a translation into English.

    I enjoyed Latin, though I think you need to have "flair" in it to be able to do well, either that or to have a really good memory for vocab and grammar. For AS we studied one set prose text (excerpts from speeches by Cicero) and one set poetry (love poetry and others by Catullus) You study them in the same way you'd look at english set texts, but there's only one shortish essay at the end, and the rest are lots of 5 mark questions. And the excerpts are of course all in Latin. It's not open book at anything. Examiners look at language/style/effect/the general thing. The last paper is the unseen comprehension/translation, which i actually found the easiest but did least well in. (84/105 in that module compared to 105/105 and 90/90 in the other two) I think latin A-level does have a good reputation though, and it's better than classical civilisation in terms of how it's viewed by the public. I have heard a few people saying that the latter maybe has the reputation of being "easier" in some ways. You have to really know the latin well to get an A, or at know enough to project that idea (ie babble like moi). I enjoyed it though, there wasn't any of the random "background" exam that we had for GCSE, and at the end of the day, if you've studied it enough, it wasn't that much hard work.

    Hope it helped
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    Oh right - yeh that does help...is there an overlap between Greek and Latin then? Is it interesting? Ive not studied to GCSE or anything as it has never been possible for me to do it. You did very well in your AS Level well done! Id like to find out more about and possibly study it at an evening class or something...I suppose it would be quite hard to start with then?
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    I think you'd have to be committed and prepared to work very hard if you'd never studied latin before at gcse as you'd have the whole language to pick up on. Saying that, it only comes into the third paper (ie the language one) so it'll all depend on how fast you pick it up. I don't think it's a subject you could just do "on the side" however. I'm sorry, I don't know anything much about greek as I've never had it avaliable to me, though I imagine the course must be pretty similar in the was it's set out. And yes I did find latin interesting, but probably more so because we had a very small class (4 people) , which always helps...
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    (Original post by lucerna)
    I think you'd have to be committed and prepared to work very hard if you'd never studied latin before at gcse as you'd have the whole language to pick up on. Saying that, it only comes into the third paper (ie the language one) so it'll all depend on how fast you pick it up. I don't think it's a subject you could just do "on the side" however. I'm sorry, I don't know anything much about greek as I've never had it avaliable to me, though I imagine the course must be pretty similar in the was it's set out. And yes I did find latin interesting, but probably more so because we had a very small class (4 people) , which always helps...
    What exam board did you do?
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    Some ppl can do latin, so ppl cant. Really. The marks in an end-of-year exam in my second year of Latin varied from 98% to 5%.

    If you can do it, it's relatively straightforward and good fun.

    Greek is significantly harder and seriously heavy on the grammar side. The two are very similar in terms of the skills needed, but there is only limited overlap in vocabulary grammar etc. Obviously doing the two together is less workload than doing two totally different subjects.

    Class Civ is something of a doss subject IMHO. Sorry. It's all stuff about art and architecture and crap.
    At a level you can do ancient history, which is literally just history of greece and rome. It's not quite the same has history - there's more looking at literature, sources, archaeology, architecture, and stuff , but it's essentially history style.

    Ppl do class civ/anc hist if :
    a) they're classics keenos
    b) they want to study the ancient world but can't stomach latin
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    (Original post by mjf)
    What exam board did you do?
    AQA. OCR for GCSE
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    (Original post by hypnos)
    Ppl do class civ/anc hist if :
    a) they're classics keenos
    b) they want to study the ancient world but can't stomach latin
    and c) if they don't have the chance to do Latin or Greek at school.

    I've just started a Classics degree having done Class Civ A Level, but no language (reason (c)) and am learning Greek from scratch (will do the same with Latin in my 3rd year). We've covered an amazing amount in only 8 weeks; it's hard going, but entirely possible to pick up quickly if you have an ineterst in the subject and a flair for languages
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    I am doing both Latin and Greek to A2 so I may be able to help. I would suggest that the high numbers of people getting top grades in the subject is because only the most academic schools tend to offer the subjects, and of them only people who are good at them tend to take them (unlike other subjects where people think they can stumble through). They're certainly not easy!

    Latin and Greek have basic similarities in structure (mainly that they are both inflected, i.e. the endings of words change), although they are completely different languages of course. And Greek uses a different alphabet, but it's not difficult to pick up.

    Starting Latin and Greek from scratch for A-level would be very hard work if you want to have success though.

    Through doing Latin and Greek to A-level people tend to pick up quite a lot of class civ and ancient history, but it would not be as thorough as doing those two subjects separately.

    Maybe you could get one of Peter Jones's very lively self-teaching books and work through it to see if you like the languages?
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    <QUOTE>and c) if they don't have the chance to do Latin or Greek at school.</QUOTE>

    Sorry, didn't mean to sound rude
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    I studied Latin right through from Year 8 to Year 13, so took it from scratch right up to A2 Level. Now I'm studying Classics at Exeter College, Oxford.

    Latin is by no means a particularly easy subject - at times, I've found it seriously impossible! You need to be very committed, I'd imagine.

    Ancient Greek is nothing like Latin in most cases - it has a different alphabet for a start. It's also not very much like Modern Greek either. I have just started studying that since I arrived at Oxford and so far - to be perfectly honest - I'm finding it impossible!!

    As Grey Faerie says, there's the possibility of taking on a Classics degree with no knowledge of Latin or Greek, but tutors usually like to see that you've got a modern language behind you, so it's advisable to study one to A Level standard.

    Classical Civilisation is by no means a doss subject, as someone suggested. The modules covered - Greek Drama, Greek and Latin literature, Ancient Art, Ancient History, etc - are all highly relevant to a Classics degree. Yes, these modules can be picked up more easily at university, than - say - Latin, but they're still useful. It's not like you do an A Level in Class Civ then forget all you've learned, because you won't need it for your Classics degree: you will!
    Ironically, Class Civ was my lowest grade at A2 Level (B - I got A's in Latin and German).

    Most offers will be AAB - and tutors look for relevant A Level subjects, if you're not taking Ancient Greek or Latin, so modern languages, essay-writing subjects, subjects which involve literary criticism. And ironically, apparently mathematicians make very good Classicists, because they're good at translation because of the scientific kind of aspect of case, gender, etc.

    Check out Ox's Classics website for more details:
    http://www.classics.ox.ac.uk

    Jess
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    (Original post by Bubblymintyaero)
    tutors usually like to see that you've got a modern language behind you, so it's advisable to study one to A Level standard.
    Jess
    x
    That's true - you have to take a language aptitude test, so experience of one language or another is pretty essential. I did German A level, and also Eng Lit and Class Civ.
 
 
 
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