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Egypt soccer boss: I'd rather starve than coach Israelis watch

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    (Original post by jakemittle)
    Following their "victory" as you say, the prime minster and defence minister had to resign....there must be a reason why, no?
    Yes - they made mistakes. You do realise victory isn't untarnished perfection don't you?

    Last time I checked, Israeli armies 20 miles from Damascus a few weeks after a surprise attack by two regional powers is a staggering achievement. The Yom Kippur war is one of the biggest military victories in the last 50 years. Other posters have said it had psychological ramifications for the Israeli people - that they no longer viewed themselves as invincible. To go from a pedestal of invincibility to a situation of winning every war tempered by a recognition of vulnerability is not exactly what defeats are made out of.

    It is a military fact that Israel won the Yom Kippur war and it's utterly absurd for anyone to dispute this. I don't personally have any emotional investment in Israel and even I can see this. In fact the only people I see calling it a victory for Arabs are Muslims. I wonder why they might want to think that.

    The other poster is also wrong to say that it stopped because of the idea of civilian casualties in Cairo. It stopped because the USSR started to get nervous about the scale of the Israeli victory and the Americans wanted Egypt as a sphere of influence. Which it got.

    As I said - the virulent hatred in the middle east as evidenced by this football coach is symptomatic of a defeated population - not a victorious one. All this coach has achieved is reaffirmation of the Arab world as a military inferior civilization compared to the Jews.

    I do have to take issue with his obsession with Arabs that are brutalised by Jews. What about the Arabs that are brutalized by the many dictatorships scattered around the Arab world? Anyone espousing this coach as a hero are not doing it on humanist grounds.

    As the golden rule states: Muslims are predominately victims of other Muslims. If this coach is such a humanist why doesn't he speak out against all the secret police, dictatorial presidents and absolute monarchs?

    It's nothing to do with the welfare of people and everything to do with the coach just affirming Islamic propaganda.
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    (Original post by Kevin02)
    "I can understand Israel's jealousy of the Egyptian team and its successes,"
    Hahaha oh no you didn't
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    (Original post by Casse)
    Amazing guy. If only the leaders of the Arab nations had the same determination and courage as him then that terrorist state would have been dismantled by now.
    :ditto:
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    sounds like a healthy rivalry to me :cool:

    \
    (Original post by Kevin02)
    lol this dude is killin it.

    Israel's soccer world has been abuzz with rumors that Egypt's coach would soon switch camps to train the national side - until Tuesday, that is, when Hassan Shehata put an end to speculation in the bluntest possible terms.

    "I'd rather die of hunger than entertain the possibility of coaching Israel," he told Egyptian daily al-Masry al-Youm.

    Shehata came close to losing his post when Egypt failed to qualify for the 2010 World Cup in South Africa.

    But the 60-year-old manager in January regained hero status among Egyptians when his side overcame Ghana to bring home the African Cup of Nations for a record third year running.

    "I can understand Israel's jealousy of the Egyptian team and its successes," Shehata was quoted as saying. "But it would be impossible from my perspective to visit Israel or train its team - even if Israel were the only country in the world that wanted to hire me."

    He continued: "How can these Zionists think that I would take on the task of coaching a side that includes murderers of children and pensioners? How could I work to help a team that represents a nation of occupiers?"

    The veteran trainer, known in Egypt's press by his nickname "The Teacher", now looks set to lead his side's campaign to qualify for the 2014 World Cup in Brazil.

    "From the moment I was born I have been hearing about the Israel that murders Arabs, that bombs, that levels towns and villages - but this is the first time I have heard that Israel plays soccer," he said. :eek:


    http://www.haaretz.com/hasen/spages/1148577.html
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    Sad that people are actually applauding hatred towards another country, also the Egyptian human rights record is hardly A++
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    (Original post by In2deep)
    Citizens of every one of those countries are taught to hate/dislike Israel from birth. This should not amaze you in any way:rolleyes:
    Why are you quoting me? I clearly explained that I knew Arabs hated Israel you don't need to quote me with a ******* picture showing it. I'm trying to ******* say that they shouldn't be hating and what does really amaze me is that people seem to not care less about the amount of hate going round everywhere.
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    If he did ever go to coach Israel, he probably wouldn't be allowed back into any Arab country.
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    (Original post by tom//)
    is he still bitter about israel kicking their arse in a real war?
    nah he got over the bitterness after they got there asses kicked in 1973 and then again later by Lebanese gurellias in 2006
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    (Original post by RyanT)
    A ceasefire was accepted by the warring parties on October 24 with Israeli forces poised just 20 miles from Damascus and 50 miles from Cairo

    Are you Arab? You seem to have an Arab way of understanding what constitutes a victory. :lolwut:
    Read my last post.

    And no, I'm not Arab. But thanks for the generalised insult at all Arab people anyway... goes to show what kind of a person you are. :rolleyes:
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    (Original post by RyanT)
    Yes - they made mistakes. You do realise victory isn't untarnished perfection don't you?

    Last time I checked, Israeli armies 20 miles from Damascus a few weeks after a surprise attack by two regional powers is a staggering achievement. The Yom Kippur war is one of the biggest military victories in the last 50 years.
    Actually, the six-day war and suez were bigger....1973 was, by the other wars standard, one of their weakest. Also, I understand your statement about an untarnished perfection. But when both the Prime Minster AND the Defence Minister have to resign, then something is wrong...I mean, why didnt any of these resignations happen in the previous wars that they won?
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    ******. Thats all he is. Israel should just take palestine out.
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    i can't believe how people are applauding what this guy said,when clearly he is abusing his position as a manager. why doesn't he use his fame more constructively and try and make and promote peace, rather than just encouraging even more division between the nations, as his fans listen and agree with him. surely, what help is that to anyone? seems all rather immature and pathetic in my opinion. What if an isaraeli coach said he wouldnt coach egyptians for the same reasons...:rolleyes:
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    (Original post by Rimipie)
    LOL israel got some major boyage
    For real (Y)
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    (Original post by DJkG.1)
    Yom Kippur, 1963? :rolleyes:

    1973, and yeah, they lost that one too.
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    (Original post by Haft_Hasht_Shish)
    It's all about perceptions, read my post above. Militarily they lost but even the Israeli government and public took it (psychologically) as a defeat. Fact.

    The government and people saw it as a victory, but the public allso saw the government's and army's unprepardeness as borderline criminal. We won, but we were allmost anihalated.
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    (Original post by Nast)
    2) The myth of Israel never losing a war is straight out false, and please don't go quoting some piece of Wikipedia knowledge and acting all superior. It's all about opinions, fact of the matter is, Egypt did end up with getting Sinai back to them


    Egypt got the Sini back by finally agreeing to peacefull relations with Israel. Prior to 1973, they rejected the mere possibility of peace, which was the whole reason Israel kept the Sini in the first place, as a buffer zone. But once Egypt understood that, militarily, it would not be able to defeat Israel, it settled for peacefull relations, and thus got the Sini back, 7 years after the 1973 war.



    and the only reason a ceasefire was actually called was due to the fact that Israel was planning to attack Cairo, a city with CIVILIANS


    There were no plans to attack Cairo. There were plans to surround the Egyptian 2nd army (the 3rd was allready surrounded), and anihalate it. A cease fire was imposed by the superpowers due to both US and Soviet interest in preventing an Egyptian collapse. The USSR wanted it because Egypt was a Soviet client, and Kissinger (the US) allso had an interest in preventing an Egyptian collapse due to his hope (which turned out to be true), that Egypt would perceive this as 'being saved by the US'. Evidentely, he hoped he could show Saddat that the US had far more leverage with Israel, and thus, a better ability than the USSR to give him his land back. Thus, a cease-fire was imposed on Israel.
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    (Original post by jakemittle)
    Actually, the six-day war and suez were bigger....1973 was, by the other wars standard, one of their weakest. Also, I understand your statement about an untarnished perfection. But when both the Prime Minster AND the Defence Minister have to resign, then something is wrong...I mean, why didnt any of these resignations happen in the previous wars that they won?

    They resigned because of allmost criminal negligence. They were responsible for not preparing the army, and not heeding intelligence assesments as to the surprise attack. This caused the IDF to be wholly unprepared, the reserves uncalled, which allmost caused the country to collapse. Despite all that, the military recuporated within days, pushed back the Syrian and Egyptian armies back to a mere few dozen miles from their capitals.
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    (Original post by Axes)
    Egypt got the Sini back by finally agreeing to peacefull relations with Israel. Prior to 1973, they rejected the mere possibility of peace, which was the whole reason Israel kept the Sini in the first place, as a buffer zone. But once Egypt understood that, militarily, it would not be able to defeat Israel, it settled for peacefull relations, and thus got the Sini back, 7 years after the 1973 war.
    Did we or did we not get something back that originally belonged to us? No matter how much you twist your words or look at it from as many perspectives as possible you did not want to lose Sinai, it was taken from you, that can be classified as a win for us and a loss for you, since we took a piece of land and you lost a piece of land. Simple mathematics.





    (Original post by Axes)
    There were no plans to attack Cairo. There were plans to surround the Egyptian 2nd army (the 3rd was allready surrounded), and anihalate it. A cease fire was imposed by the superpowers due to both US and Soviet interest in preventing an Egyptian collapse. The USSR wanted it because Egypt was a Soviet client, and Kissinger (the US) allso had an interest in preventing an Egyptian collapse due to his hope (which turned out to be true), that Egypt would perceive this as 'being saved by the US'. Evidentely, he hoped he could show Saddat that the US had far more leverage with Israel, and thus, a better ability than the USSR to give him his land back. Thus, a cease-fire was imposed on Israel.
    Typical textbook answer from textbooks that are taught at university and college. Honestly has it never crossed your mind that if someone stations his troops outside a major city then it means that they're probably willing to attack it? More than 90% of Egypt is unpopulated, it just so happened that the Israeli army was stationed one of Egypt's densest cities?
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    [QUOTE]
    (Original post by Nast)
    Did we or did we not get something back that originally belonged to us?

    And you originally lost it because you could not bring yourselves to sign a peace agreement with Israel. Prior to 1967, you were unwilling to sign any document accepting Israel's existance. You had to initiate (and lose) two wars, and have the Sini at stake, for you to sign it. Once the Egyptian government changed its stance in this regard, we had no reason to keep the Sini.




    Typical textbook answer from textbooks that are taught at university and college. Honestly has it never crossed your mind that if someone stations his troops outside a major city then it means that they're probably willing to attack it?

    They did not station large amount of troops outside Cairo. When you look at the troop dispositions, the IDF was clearly attempting (succesfully) to surround Egypt's forces east of the Canal, and thus destroy them. It succesfully did that in the south, and was attempting to do the same in the Ismaliyah sector. There is not a shred of evidence to suggest that the IDF wanted to attack Cairo, nor did it have any realistic chance of succesfully doing so.


    More than 90% of Egypt is unpopulated, it just so happened that the Israeli army was stationed one of Egypt's densest cities?

    It wasnt. It's attacks took place on a north/south axis once it crossed the Canal, not West (towards cairo).
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    (Original post by Deshi)
    I just find the word funny :teehee:
    Well it's not.
 
 
 
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